Date: Tuesday, October 03, 2023 1:40 PM - Tuesday, October 03, 2023 3:10 PM
Location: On Zoom

Speakers:

  • Patrick W. Galbraith

Moderator:

  • Kyle Cleveland, ICAS Co-Director

Overview

With ease of access on streaming platforms, major international co-productions and high-profile celebrity fans, anime is more influential than ever before. Indeed, it is a pillar of the Japanese government’s ongoing public diplomacy initiatives under the umbrella of “Cool Japan.” Placing anime in historical and sociocultural context, this presentation argues that anime became anime between the early 1970s and early 1980s. This decade is marked by what can be described as the “three booms,” or intense excitement and innovation around the anime works and characters. Peeling back the layers of these booms, the presentation shows how fans were cultivated by the industry, how fans themselves became experts contributing to magazines and zines and how affection for characters transformed the ways that manga/anime works were produced and consumed. To facilitate understanding, the presentation will zoom in on three science fiction works – namely, Space Battleship Yamato, Mobile Suit Gundam and Super Dimension Fortress Macross – to demonstrate changes that were occurring before the “Yamato boom,” continued through the “Gundam boom” and pushed on into and beyond the “lolicon boom.”

Webinar Access

Registration required for meeting access: https://temple.zoom.us/j/94980652538?pwd=OEhjOEhYczY3YlpIbzljb1BDbXVudz09 

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Date & Time:

Tuesday, October 3, 2023, 13:40-15:10

 

This event is organized by the Institute of Contemporary Asian Studies (ICAS).

Note: All ICAS events are held in English, open to the public, and admission is free unless otherwise noted.

Speakers:

Patrick W. Galbraith

Patrick W. Galbraith is Associate Professor in the School of International Communication at Senshū University in Tokyo. After earning a PhD in Information Studies from the University of Tokyo, he went on to earn a second PhD in Cultural Anthropology from Duke University. His recent publications include “Otaku and the Struggle for Imagination in Japan” (Duke University Press, 2019), “Erotic Comics in Japan: An Introduction to Eromanga” (Amsterdam University Press, 2020) and “The Ethics of Affect: Lines and Life in a Tokyo Neighborhood” (Stockholm University Press, 2021).