Past Course Descriptions (Osaka)

Summer Semester 2019 Session I

FLED 5470:

Introduction to the Study of TESOL

Professor:
Dr. John Eidswick
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 8 - August 7
Day & Time:
Wednesday, 18:00-21:00

The primary purposes of this course are (a) to help new students develop essential academic skills for succeeding in the M.S.Ed program and (b) to provide an introductory overview of the field of TESOL.

Academic skills covered in this course will include those related to researching and writing academic texts and presenting their contents, such as library use, summarizing and paraphrasing, research paper organization, technical terms related to TESOL, and APA style. The overview of the field of TESOL will include themes such as theories and characteristics of first and second language learning, individual differences, and naturalistic versus classroom-based L2 learning. Students will engage in regular classroom discussions to convey comprehension and viewpoints of course materials.

The course is designed for students who are new to the M.S.Ed. program, who have little or no experience studying in an English-language university, and/or are not familiar with formal academic reading, writing, discussion, and presentation.

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Lightbown, P. M., & Spada, N. (2013). How languages are learned (Oxford handbooks for language teachers). (4th ed.). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2010). Publication manual of the American psychological association. (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)
  • Richards, J. C., & Schmidt, R. (2010). Longman dictionary of language teaching and applied linguistics. (4th ed.). Oxon, UK: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

ENES 8654:

Teaching and Learning Vocabulary

Professor:
Dr. David Beglar
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 7 - June 20
Day & Time:
Tuesday, 18:00-21:00
Thursday, 18:00-21:00

This course has been cancelled

The course is focused on teaching, learning, and researching vocabulary — single words and multi-word units — in a second language. In this course, we will look at a wide range of topics, such as what is involved in knowing a word; how much vocabulary is needed when using the four major skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing; acquiring and using specialized vocabulary; learning words from context; using dictionaries effectively, and learning multi-word units. The course has two primary aims. The first aim is for participants to become more familiar with the wide variety of research that makes up the field of second language vocabulary acquisition. The second aim, which rests on the foundation provided by the first aim, is to develop the knowledge and skills necessary to create an effective plan for teaching vocabulary in a course or in a foreign-language curriculum.

Course participants will read extensively, complete in-class tasks regarding vocabulary teaching and learning, participate in and lead small group discussions, conduct a course project by analyzing the lexical composition of a language teaching textbook, test (e.g., entrance examination), or written materials designed for native English speakers. Participants will make an in-class presentation about their course project. By the end of the course, course participants should be aware of the major issues pertinent to teaching, learning, and researching second-language vocabulary, be able to design a vocabulary component for a language course, and advise teachers and learners on vocabulary learning strategies. Course participants should read the first six chapters in Learning Vocabulary in Another Language before the first class meeting.

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D degrees.

Required Textbook:

EDUC 8274:

Contexts for Content Teaching and Learning

Professor:
Dr. Tamara Swenson
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 9 - June 24
Day & Time:
Monday, 18:00-21:00
Thursday, 18:00-21:00

The role of content in language teaching, how much does it belong in the foreign language class and how it should be integrated with language learning outcomes to promote language learning, has been a debate since the 1980’s. An extensive body of research demonstrates that “content-based instruction is typically more effective than ‘text-based’ instruction across a wide range of L2 instructional contexts” (Brinton, et al., 2006, p 2).

Content-based instruction (CBI) is the integration of content instruction and foreign language teaching. More recently, Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) has become an umbrella term describing the joint learning of a content subject such as science or history with a foreign language, thereby learning new content and the language simultaneously. In all its manifestations, content-based language teaching is based on the principle that successful language learning occurs when students are presented with target language material in meaningful, contextualized forms where the primary focus is on acquiring information and knowledge. Content is the organizing principle, and aspects of language (linguistic structures, vocabulary, functions) are presented as needed.

The goal of this course is to clarify the complexities in CBI and identify key features of effective content-based programs that can be applied with learner groups of various ages. Participants will explore the theoretical underpinnings of CBI, design content-based units of instruction, and develop the knowledge and skills necessary to be an effective content plus language teacher in a wide range of language teaching contexts.

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D degrees.

Required Textbook:

Recommended Textbook:

Summer Semester 2019 Session II

FLED 5470:

Introduction to the Study of TESOL

Professor:
Dr. John Eidswick
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 8 - August 7
Day & Time:
Wednesday, 18:00-21:00

Continued from Summer Session I.

FLED 5437:

Intercultural Communication

Professor:
Dr. Mark Sawyer
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
June 25 - August 8
Day & Time:
Tuesday, 18:00-21:00
Thursday, 18:00-21:00

Successful intercultural communication in the future is an implicit goal of most foreign language learning and teaching around the world. Intercultural communication in the present, with widely varying success, is what goes on every day in Japan between non-Japanese language teachers and their Japanese students and colleagues. This course will investigate the factors that influence the success of interactions between people who differ in cultural backgrounds. It will thus broaden the notion of what communicative competence for our students involves, and will provide directions for seeking more rewarding relationships in our own intercultural personal and professional contexts.

The development of intercultural competence will be the main focus of the course, but general topics to be considered along the way include: cross-cultural pragmatics, politeness, and communication styles; identity and self-concept in relation to communication; nonverbal communication; the influences of language and culture on the way we think; ethnocentrism and stereotyping; intercultural adaptation, relationships, and conflicts; and the influences of media and institutions. Supplementary readings will focus on intercultural communication in Japan and involving Japanese outside of Japan. Another rich source of learning in the course will be the instructor’s’ and participants’ own experiences and reflections, including the sharing of classroom materials that might facilitate intercultural competence.

Course requirements include participation in in-class and online discussions, one or two oral presentations, and an “Autobiography of Intercultural Encounters,” which is a brief writing task used by the Council of Europe for intercultural training.

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D degrees.

Required Textbook:

  • Holliday, A., Kullman, J., & Hyde, M. (2017). Intercultural communication: An advanced resource book for students. (3rd ed.). Oxon, UK: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

EPSY 5529:

Language Assessment

Professor:
Dr. Steven Ross
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
June 26 - August 7
Day & Time:
Monday, 18:00-21:00
Wednesday, 18:00-21:00

*Due to the relocation of TUJ Tokyo Campus in August, class schedule for this course will be changed.

For further details, please check the schedule chart below.

The course will survey the field of language assessment with a focus on assessment in the institutional context, including language testing for admissions, placement, diagnostics, achievement, proficiency, and for measuring language learning growth change over time. The course will introduce topics such as measurement constructs and models of language knowledge, the design of tests and assessments, item and task construction, scoring and rating tests and assessments, the training of raters, issues of fairness and standards, and the use of arguments and evidence in the support of test validation. Different perspectives on validity, including, face, ecological, content, consequential, concurrent, convergent, divergent, and construct validity will be introduced. Students will also have the opportunity to work with software useful for test analysis such as Rasch measurement using software such as Winsteps, FACETS. Students will get access to several authentic data sets for practicing data analysis and interpretation. The course will also examine different types of test and assessment uses for norm-referenced and criterion-referenced purposes, as well as rating criteria for oral proficiency interviews.

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D degrees.

Dr. Ross's Class Schedule

Session Day Date Class Time Note
1 Wednesday June 26, 2019 18:00-21:00  
2 Monday July 1, 2019 18:00-21:00  
3 Wednesday July 3, 2019 18:00-21:00  
4 Monday July 8, 2019 18:00-21:00  
5 Wednesday July 10, 2019 18:00-21:00  
6 Monday July 15, 2019 14:00-17:00 *Date and Time Changed
7 Monday July 15, 2019 18:00-21:00  
8 Wednesday July 17, 2019 18:00-21:00  
9 Monday July 22, 2019 18:00-21:00  
10 Wednesday July 24, 2019 18:00-21:00  
11 Monday July 29, 2019 18:00-21:00  
12 Wednesday July 31, 2019 18:00-21:00  
13 Monday August 5, 2019 18:00-21:00  
14 Wednesday August 7, 2019 18:00-21:00  
14 Monday August 12, 2019 18:00-21:00  

TESOL Special Projects - Distinguished Lecturer Series

This Lecturer Series will consist of three weekend seminars. Each seminar course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees. The first three hours of each seminar (Saturday,14:00 to 17:00) are free and open to the public. Weekend seminars are free for Master's and doctoral graduates of Temple University Japan Campus; the fee for other weekend auditors is ¥13,000.

ENES 8655: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 1):

Second Language Pragmatics: Theory, Research, and Pedagogy

Professor:
Dr. Naoko Taguchi, (Carnegie Mellon University, U.S.A.)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, May 18, 14:00-21:00
 
Sunday, May 19, 10:00-17:00

Pragmatics, an area within linguistics, is concerned with how people use language in a social context and why they use it in particular ways. The aim of this course is to develop awareness of pragmatics phenomena in our everyday communication, as well as to understand opportunities and challenges that second language (L2) learners face when learning pragmatics in L2. The course is divided into three units. The first unit, theory, surveys theories of pragmatics and pragmatic competence drawing on two distinct yet complementary fields, linguistics and second language acquisition (SLA). The second unit, research, examines the application of pragmatics theories to SLA research through critical discussions of recent empirical findings. The third unit, pedagogy, introduces issues related to teaching and assessment of pragmatic competence. We will examine pragmatics-related materials in a textbook and curriculum, major findings from instructional studies, and common assessment methods and their implications. Through critical examinations of the literature in these three areas, the course will help develop an understanding of the role of pragmatics in L2 research and teaching.

A collection of articles and book chapters will be provided as required readings.

Recommended Textbook:

ENES 8656: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 2):

Issues of (mis)communication in Science and Mathematics Classrooms--the Surprising Importance of Language

Professor:
Dr. Timothy Fukawa-Connelly (Temple University, U.S.A.)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, June 29, 14:00-21:00
 
Sunday, June 30, 10:00-17:00

This course will synthesize the results of various classroom-based (content-based) studies of language and communicative practices in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) classrooms. At least in the US, science and mathematics classes are often sites where ELL students are mainstreamed early due to some educators’ belief that there are relatively few language demand in such courses. We will justify the claim that there is a mathematics and science register, exploring features of the register(s), including issues of polysemy in which the common communicative meaning might interfere with communication. During the seminar we will discuss a range of descriptive, quasi-experimental, and quantitative studies, which explore ways in which the language use and communicative practices of teachers and learners might support or inhibit the acquisition of science or mathematics content. We will explore lecturing practices in traditional mathematics and science classes, both based on published reports and by watching and analyzing videos from different countries. We will consider the relationship between instructor learning goals (including hypothesized goals based on content-expertise), how that content is communicated, and affordances and constraints of those practices for student learning. We will consider the importance of note-taking practices on memory and learning, and, when possible, differences between ELL and L1 proficiencies. Finally, if time allows, we will consider the roles and types of feedback practices and analyze the language implications of those practices, including the symbolically dense aspects.

Required Textbook:

  • Mary J Schleppegrell (2007) The linguistic challenges of mathematics teaching and learning: A research review, Reading & Writing Quarterly, 23:2, 139-159. DOI: 10.1080/10573560601158461

ENES 8657: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 3):

Usage-Based Second Language Acquisition: Implicit and Explicit Learning and Their Interface

Professor:
Dr. Nick Ellis (University of Michigan, U.S.A.)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, July 20, 14:00-21:00
 
Sunday, July 21, 10:00-17:00

We learn language through our experiences of using language. Usage-based approaches to language investigate how this happens. Various disciplines collaborate in these inquiries. Corpus Linguistics explores the latent structure of the problem-space – the usage evidence from which we learn. Cognitive Linguistics details our language representations – the inventory of linguistic constructions as pairings of form and meaning or communicative function. Constructions range from simple morphemes like –ing, through lexis, to complex and abstract syntactic frames such as the Subject–Verb–Object–Object verb-argument construction. Psycholinguistics is the experimental study of language processing. Psycholinguistic demonstrations of effects of frequency upon language processing provide evidence of the implicit learning over usage of this variety of symbolic associations. Cognitive Psychology explores our complementary learning systems. Implicit learning occurs without conscious awareness; it involves simple learning mechanisms in the distributional analyses of the exemplars of a given form–meaning pair that take various characteristics of the exemplar into consideration, including how frequent it is and what kind of words and phrases and larger contexts it occurs with. Explicit learning involves more conscious, attentionally-focused, processing. It allows our learning of novel representations. Emergentism concerns how language learning is a gradual process in which the language system emerges as a complex and adaptive (continuously fine–tuned) system from the interaction of these cognitive learning mechanisms during language interactions with other speakers in various social settings and media. Applied Linguistics and cognitive psychology share a concern with the ways in which explicit learning impacts upon implicit learning. Answers to this issue of “interface” affect the ways we approach language acquisition, the ways we interact with learners, and whether and how we plan instruction. This course will illustrate the contributions of these approaches to our understanding of first and second language learning of morphology, lexis, and verb-argument constructions.

Doctoral Courses

For Ph.D 2012 and 2015 students only.

EDUC 9998:

Dissertation Proposal Writing

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1-3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

Summer I or Summer II

This course is for those Ph.D. students who have passed the Qualifying Examination and working on their dissertation proposal.

The Ph.D. students are required to take Culminating Courses (6 semester hours overall, minimum 2 semester hours of EDUC 9999). Culminating Courses: Qualifying Exam Preparation Course (EDUC 9994), Proposal Writing Course (EDUC 9998) and Dissertation Writing Course (EDUC 9999).

EDUC 9999:

Dissertation Writing

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1-3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

Summer I or Summer II

Minimum 2 credit hours of EDUC 9999 are required for the Ph.D. students.

Students wishing to register for this course should obtain permission from the professor and complete the registration process during the registration period.

EDUC 9282:

Research Apprenticeship

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

Summer I through Summer II

Ph.D. Students are required to take two 3-credit Research Apprenticeship courses.

If you wish to take an apprenticeship course, you first need to write a 300-400-word abstract of your proposed project (unless you are assisting a professor with one of his or her studies). This abstract should include basic information such as (a) the gaps in the literature you are addressing, (b) the purpose(s) of the study, (c) specific research questions, and (d) your methodology, including information about the participants, instruments, procedures, and the analyses you will perform. You will then need to send the abstract to the advisor you wish to work with (Consult the list of Apprenticeship advisors on the registration form to see who is available), and if the advisor approves your plan, you can then register for the course with that advisor.

For Ph.D. 2017 students only

Students in the Ph.D. program are required to take the doctoral seminar listed below.

EPSY 8827:

Research Design and Methodology

Professor:
Dr. Steven Ross
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 24 - August 3
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00-21:00
Saturday, 14:00-17:00

*Due to the relocation of TUJ Tokyo Campus in August, class schedule for this course will be changed.

For more details about the schedule, please check the schedule chart below.

EPSY8827 will review and consolidate the designs and research methods introduced in the two previous quantitative research methods courses. The syllabus will be expanded to include other research designs and novel analysis techniques such as event history analysis, variable rule analysis, multi-level modeling, structural equation models, and longitudinal research methods using latent growth models. Students will have the opportunity to expand and augment their research design and analysis repertoire with downloadable software such as HLM 7 and R. Hierarchical linear models will be used to assess the influence of contextual factors on both groups and individuals for various kinds of research designs. R will be used to model fixed and random effects for various language learning experiments such as those using grammaticality or reaction times as outcomes, as well for modeling linguistic variation. The use of AMOS will be revised and expanded to construct structural equation models and longitudinal latent growth curve models with individual differences covariates tested as moderating variables affecting various language learning-related phenomena.

This course is required for the Ph. D. degree.

Required Textbook:

Professor will use above textbook, as well as pdf files from journals for this course.

Dr. Ross's Class Schedule

Session Day Date Class Time Note
1 Friday May 24, 2019 18:00-21:00  
2 Saturday May 25, 2019 10:00-13:00 *Time changed
3 Saturday May 25, 2019 14:00-17:30 Additional 30 minutes
4 Friday June 7, 2019 18:00-21:00  
5 Saturday June 8, 2019 14:00-17:30 Additional 30 minutes
6 Friday June 21, 2019 18:00-21:00  
7 Saturday June 22, 2019 14:00-17:30 Additional 30 minutes
8 Friday July 5, 2019 18:00-21:00  
9 Saturday July 6, 2019 14:00-17:30 Additional 30 minutes
10 Friday July 19, 2019 18:00-21:00  
11 Saturday July 20, 2019 9:30-13:00 Additional 30 minutes
*Time changed due to seminar 3
12 Friday August 2, 2019 18:00-21:00  
13 Saturday August 3, 2019 14:00-17:30 Additional 30 minutes
13 Friday August 16, 2019 18:00-21:00  
14 Saturday August 17, 2019 14:00-17:30