Past Course Descriptions (Osaka)

Summer Session I: May 7 - June 24

FLED 5470:

Introduction to the Study of TESOL

Professor:
Dr. Nathaniel Carney
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 11 - August 3
Day & Time:
Monday, 18:00-21:00

The primary objectives of this course are (a) to help new students develop essential academic skills for succeeding in the M.S.Ed program and (b) to provide an introductory overview of the field of TESOL.

In this course, students will develop academic skills related to reading academic texts, analyzing research, and synthesizing findings in writing and oral presentations. Skills such as library use, research paper organization, summarizing, and quoting and paraphrasing will be emphasized. Students will also be expected to develop their understanding and use of TESOL-related terminology and APA style.

The overview of the field of TESOL will include discussions of theories and characteristics of first and second language learning, individual differences, and naturalistic versus classroom-based L2 learning. Students will be expected to engage actively in classroom discussions, sharing understanding and perspectives about course material content.

There will be 13 regular class sessions for this course. In addition to the regular class sessions, all the students will be required to attend any one of the three Distinguished Lecturer Weekend Seminars (only the first three hours of the Saturday session 14:00-17:00).

The course is designed for students who are new to the M.S.Ed. program, who have little or no experience studying in an English-language university, and/or are not familiar with formal academic reading, writing, discussion, and presentation.

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2020). Publication manual of the American psychological association. (7th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

ENES 8744:

Psychology in Foreign Language Learning

Professor:
Dr. Mark Sawyer
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 11 - June 24
Day & Time:
Monday and Wednesday, 18:00-21:00

The pedagogical effectiveness and career satisfaction of language teachers can be enhanced by a deeper awareness of their students’ and their own psychological processes. Psychology in Foreign Language Learning is an introductory course that provides an overview of relevant current theory and research toward such enhancement, by helping participants to: 1) become familiar with psychological constructs that are relevant to language learning and teaching; 2) deepen their insights into themselves as language learners and teachers, and 3) fine-tune and expand their teaching practices based on ideas and information explored in the course.

The constructs to be covered include identity, personality, affect, learning strategies and styles, group dynamics, motivation, and autonomy, with a particular emphasis on the last two.

Course requirements include a language learning autobiography, a presentation/discussion leadership of a supplementary reading, and participation in weekly discussions, both online (written) and in-class, relating the content of the assigned readings to participants’ learning and teaching experiences. The final project can be either a review of research in a psychological sub-field appearing after the textbook was published, or a revision of the language learning autobiography, deepened by relating actual experiences to the psychological concepts that shaped them.

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees.

Required Textbook:

  • Williams, M., Mercer, S., & Ryan, S. (2015). Exploring psychology in language learning and teaching. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

Recommended Textbook:

FLED 5433:

Intersections in Media, Communication and Education

Professor:
Dr. Tamara Swenson
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 8 - June 20
Day & Time:
Friday 18:00-21:00
Saturday 14:00-17:00

The time of session 4 on Saturday, May 16 will be changed to 10:00-13:00 due to the seminar 1.

Technological changes have brought rapid change to all aspects of education. Digital tools now provide students and teachers with access to a vast amount of information through an expanding number of media platforms. These digital technologies are simultaneously transformative and disruptive. Though often touted as the "answer" to the issue of student engagement, technological tools do not always live up to the early promises. As the language laboratory has given way to the allure of mobile devices, educators need to do more than just add a new tool. They need to make sure that the technology they use leads to classrooms that are digitally rich and pedagogically engaging. This course will explore intersections in media, communication, and language education with the goal of understanding how to ensure that the integration of technology is leading to deeper learning. Topics will include the use of digital tools that aid teachers in completing tasks (record keeping, communicating, testing); the use of digital tools to transform education in ways previously not possible; and the possibilities for digital tools to move students to shift their conscious understanding of the wider world. In short, this course will explore both the disruptive and transformative use of technology in second language education.

In addition to course readings, participants will have a mid-term exam, make written responses to issues discussed in the course, lead small group discussions, and either write a research paper on one aspect of the use of media and technology in second language education or use digital tools to create materials appropriate to a specific learner group and discuss these in a materials report.

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees.

Required Textbook:

  • Chapelle, C. A., & Sauro, S. (Eds.). (2020). The handbook of technology and second language teaching and learning. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley Blackwell. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

Recommended Textbook:

A reading packet will also be provided

Summer Session II: June 25 - August 12

FLED 5470:

Introduction to the Study of TESOL

Professor:
Dr. Nathaniel Carney
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 11 - August 3
Day & Time:
Monday, 18:00-21:00

Continued from Summer Session I.

EPSY 8625:

Introduction to Research Methodology

Professor:
Dr. Steven Ross
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
June 25 - August 11
Day & Time:
Tuesday and Thursday, 18:00-21:00

The professor will inform students about the software (downloadable free) requirement at the first class meeting.

The course will introduce the fundamentals of research design and analysis for hypothetical-deductive research in applied linguistics and SLA. The course presupposes no prior experience conducting research, data analysis, or any knowledge of statistics. The initial focus will be on variables, sampling, randomization, and moderating variables, as well as how statistical controls can be built into research designs. We will review research designs common in used in studies of language learning, including factors that affect internal and external validity. Focus will be put on experimental and quasi-experimental designs, and the fundamentals of data analysis such as the basics of measurement, cross-tabulation of frequencies, correlations among variables, simple and multiple regression designs, regression discontinuity, regression point displacement, exploratory factor analysis, common approaches to group comparisons using various kinds of t-tests, and analysis of variance and covariance. Students will also have the opportunity to compare frequentist statistical inference with the Bayesian alternative. The course will be primarily hands on, with weekly data analysis practice.

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees.

Recommended Textbook:

FLED 5460:

Second Language Pragmatics

Professor:
Dr. Steven Ross
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
June 29 - August 12
Day & Time:
Monday and Wednesday, 18:00-21:00

FLED 5460 will survey the literature and the salient research on the study of second language pragmatics. The domain of pragmatics encompasses a wide range of language use phenomena such as recognition and production of speech acts (requesting, refusing, suggesting, agreeing, disagreeing, apologizing, etc.), recognition and formulation of politeness, indirectness, innuendo, as well as direct and implied meanings (explicature and implicature). Second language pragmatic knowledge has been conceptualized as distinct from knowledge of grammar and lexis, and has in second language theories been postulated to be a separate strategic or pragmatic competence as made evident in a second language users’ socio-pragmatic knowledge (role relations and how they affect the grammatical formulation of utterances), and pragma-linguistic knowledge (how the formulation of utterances conveys intended indirect meanings to interlocutors). A recurring theme in second language pragmatics is the acquisition sequence, starting with transfer of first language norms in second language interaction, which are slowly replaced with formulae common in the target language speech community. We will sample the existing literature on these acquisition sequences and the ways different first languages typically manifest socio-pragmatic and pragma-linguistic transfer to English, and how learners of languages that have honorifics face added complexity in the acquisition of socio-pragmatic competence. The course will examine a variety of research designs used for second language pragmatics, and will critically review the methodology that has been thus far deployed for its study – in particular discourse completion tasks, role plays, and observation of language learning in the wild. We will evaluate studies featuring various experimental designs, and more recent approaches involving discourse analysis and conversation analysis used as the preliminary phase of mixed methods research. We will also examine a corpus of video vignettes and role plays extracted from oral proficiency interviews with a view to evaluating how second language strategic and pragmatic competence can be assessed.

This course can be used as elective credits for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees.

There is no textbook requirement for this course.

TESOL Special Projects - Distinguished Lecturer Series

This Lecturer Series will consist of three weekend seminars. Each seminar course can be used as elective credit (1 credit) for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees. The first three hours of each seminar (Saturday, 14:00 to 17:00) are free and open to the public. Weekend seminars are free for master’s and doctoral graduates of Temple University Japan Campus for auditing; the fee for other weekend auditors is ¥13,000.

ENES 8655: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 1)

Assessment in the EFL Classroom (Cancelled)

Professor:
Dr. Sara Cushing (Georgia State University, U.S.A.)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, May 16 from 14:00 to 21:00
 
Sunday, May 17 from 10:00 to 17:00

This seminar has been canceled.

Assessment in the language classroom is a complex issue that many teachers find challenging. We can distinguish between assessment of learning, or summative assessment, and assessment for learning, or formative assessment. Both formative and summative assessment can support student learning and help teachers and students understand where students are in their language learning, where they need to be, and how best to reach their learning goals.

In this seminar, participants will learn to develop formative and summative assessments for language classrooms. The opening lecture will focus on important aspects of useful assessment, including reliability, validity, practicality, and washback, and how research on large-scale assessment can be translated into classroom practices. The remaining sessions will focus on hands-on activities designed to help participants select, adapt, and create classroom tests for summative assessment and activities for formative assessment, including peer and self-assessment, using rubrics to evaluate speech and writing, providing effective feedback to students, and using assessment results to improve instruction.

Required Textbook:

ENES 8656: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 2)

Teaching Spoken Interaction (Cancelled)

Professor:
Dr. Nöel Houck (California State Polytechnic University, U.S.A.)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, June 27 from 14:00 to 21:00
 
Sunday, June 28 from 10:00 to 17:00

This seminar has been canceled.

Pragmatic and discourse competence in the target language are often elusive, especially when learners in an EFL situation do not have the opportunity to interact with L1 speakers of English. However, while most English teachers labor to build students’ grammatical competence, pragmatic and discourse competence tend to receive little attention. In this presentation, we will look at how L1 speakers perform spoken pragmatic and discourse actions in natural linguistic contexts. Since in real life, interaction involves initiating and responding actions, learners need to know how to negotiate their way through the sequences initiated by, for example, invitations or requests. A look at not only how sequences are initiated, but how they unfold in natural spoken interaction can provide considerable insight into what aspects of interaction teachers may need to teach and what they need to know in order to teach them. In this course, we will look at interaction in discourse contexts. We will then focus on implications for teaching how to perform ‘appropriate’ or ‘acceptable’ (or even ‘recognizable’) sequences.

ENES 8657: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 3)

Teaching English to Young Learners

Professor:
Dr. Mitsue Allen-Tamai (Aoyama Gakuin University, Japan)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, July 18 from 14:00 to 21:00
 
Sunday, July 19 from 10:00 to 17:00

In order to keep up with the pace of globalization, people in non-English-speaking countries are eager to acquire high levels of communicative English proficiency. In response to this current social demand, the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology (MEXT) publicized its urgent English education reform from elementary to high school. The introduction of English education into elementary schools will officially start from April, this year after two years of transitional period. MEXT has specified the course’s aims and contents in the latest Course of Study issued in 2017, and MEXT-approved textbooks for upper elementary school children are now accessible.

This seminar will provide an introduction to the theory and practice of Teaching English to Young Learners (TEYL), from the ages of three to twelve, after viewing its implementation in public education in the world and Japan. The objectives of the course are to discuss the significance of TEYL and develop: (a) an understanding of the psychology of young learners and their language acquisition and (b) a working knowledge of methodologies, classroom practices, and assessment.

Doctoral Courses

EDUC 9991:

Research Apprenticeship (Summer I through Summer II)

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

Ph.D. students are required to take two 3-credit Research Apprenticeship courses.

If you wish to take an apprenticeship course, you first need to write a 300-400-word abstract of your proposed project (unless you are assisting a professor with one of his or her studies). This abstract should include basic information such as (a) the gaps in the literature you are addressing, (b) the purpose(s) of the study, (c) specific research questions, and (d) your methodology, including information about the participants, instruments, procedures, and the analyses you will perform. You will then need to send the abstract to the advisor you wish to work with (Consult the list of Apprenticeship advisors on the registration form to see who is available), and if the advisor approves your plan, you can then register for the course with that advisor.

EDUC 9998:

Dissertation Proposal Design (Summer I or Summer II)

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1-3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

This course is for those Ph.D. students who have passed the Preliminary Examination and working on their dissertation proposal.

The Ph.D. students are required to take Culminating Courses (6 semester hours overall, minimum 2 semester hours of EDUC 9999). Culminating Courses: Preliminary Preparation Course (EDUC 9994), Dissertation Proposal Design Course (EDUC 9998) and Doctor of Education Dissertation Course (EDUC 9999).

EDUC 9999:

Doctor of Education Dissertation (Summer I or Summer II)

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1-6 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

Minimum 2 credit hours of EDUC 9999 are required for the Ph.D. students.

Students wishing to register for this course should obtain permission from the professor and complete the registration process during the registration period.