Past Course Descriptions (Osaka)

Fall Semester 2019

FLED 5470:

Introduction to the Study of TESOL

Professor:
Dr. Nathanial Carney
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
September 2 - December 2
Day & Time:
Monday, 18:00-21:00
 

The session 7 on Monday, October 14 is canceled. In lieu of session 7, students are required to attend any one of the weekend seminars instead and write a homework assignment about it.

The primary purposes of this course are (a) to help new students develop essential academic skills for succeeding in the M.S.Ed. program and (b) to provide an introductory overview of the field of TESOL.

In this course, students will develop academic skills related to reading academic texts, analyzing research, and synthesizing findings in writing and oral presentations. Skills such as library use, research paper organization, summarizing, and quoting and paraphrasing will be emphasized. Students will also be expected to develop their understanding and use of TESOL-related terminology and APA style.

The overview of the field of TESOL will include themes such as theories and characteristics of first and second language learning, individual differences, and naturalistic versus classroom-based L2 learning. Students will be expected to engage actively in classroom discussions, sharing understanding and perspectives about course material content.

There will be 13 regular class sessions for this course and in addition to the regular class sessions, all the students will be required to attend any one of the three Distinguished Lecturer Weekend Seminars (only the first three hours of the Saturday session 14:00-17:00).

The course is designed for students who are new to the M.S.Ed. program, who have little or no experience studying in an English-language university, and/or are not familiar with formal academic reading, writing, discussion, and presentation.

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2010). Publication manual of the American psychological association. (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)
  • Richards, J. C., & Schmidt, R.W. (2010). Longman dictionary of language teaching and applied linguistics. (4th ed.). Oxon, UK: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

TESL 5612:

Applied Language Study II: Grammar, Morphology and Classroom Discourse

Professor:
Dr. David Beglar
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
September 10 - December 10
Day & Time:
Tuesday, 18:00-21:00

As the first class meeting for this course is on Tuesday, September 10, after the add/drop period ends, the office will only accept a drop request for this course after the first class meeting until 10:00 a.m. on Wednesday, September 11, 2019.

The acquisition of morphology and syntax (i.e., morpho-syntax) has been at the heart of the field of second language acquisition since its modern inception in the 1970s. The reason for this focus is simple: Acquiring these aspects of a foreign language is extremely difficult for most adult foreign language learners given the complexity and abstractness of many morpho-syntactic forms. This course has three main goals. The first goal is to become more familiar with basic aspects of English morpho-syntax (e.g., the syntax of declarative statements, question formation, negation, and embedding) in order to better understand some of the key morpho-syntactic mechanisms used in the English language. The second goal is to become conversant with a wide variety of empirical research into the acquisition of English morpho-syntax. This body of research includes theoretical investigations of the cognitive mechanisms held responsible for the acquisition of morpho-syntax as well as classroom applications of various pedagogical approaches used to teach particular aspects of English morpho-syntax. The third goal is to give course participants an opportunity to conduct a hands-on teaching project in which they use a pedagogical approach that is new to them for teaching one aspect of English morpho-syntax. In this way, the participants can expand the pedagogical techniques available to them. Other course assignments include weekly readings, sentence-diagramming tasks, leading and participating in small group discussions, and a final examination. Participants should read Chapters 1-7 in The Grammar Book before the first class meeting.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Larsen-Freeman, D., & Celce-Murcia, M. (2016). The grammar book: Form, meaning, and use for English language teachers. (3rd ed.). Boston, MA: National Geographic Learning, Heinle Cengage Learning. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)
  • American Psychological Association. (2010). Publication manual of the American psychological association. (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

Recommended Textbook:

TESL 5613:

Multilingual Students’ Literacy Development

Professor:
Dr. Tamara Swenson
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
September 13 - December 13
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00-21:00

The session 11 on Friday, November 22 is cancelled. The make-up session will be held on Saturday, November 9, 10:00-13:00.

As the first class meeting for this course is on Friday, September 13, after the add/drop period ends, the office will not accept add/drop requests for this course after the first class meeting. Interested students can access the course syllabus for this course from Osaka Office during the Fall 2019 Add/Drop Period.

While virtually all people comprehend and speak a language, this is not the case with the literacy skills of reading and writing. That millions of people in the world are illiterate or semi-literate has powerful implications for their ability to function successfully in modern technological societies which increasingly require sophisticated literacy skills.

This course will first consider the fundamental questions of "what:" What are reading and writing? What are the component parts of these skills, and how does our understanding of those component parts influence our teaching of the skills? Then, it will turn to the question of "which:" Which types of reading and writing tasks and activities are available to teachers? In this portion of the course, we will examine a wide variety of tasks that have been developed for teaching these two skills and their probable effectiveness in the light of our understanding of what reading and writing are. Finally, it will consider “how:” How can we synthesize our knowledge of what we believe reading and writing to be with the tasks that are available to us in order to produce an effective and coherent reading or writing course? This final purpose will allow course participants to design their own reading and writing courses and modify existing ones to make them more effective.

Students taking the course will lead and take part in group discussions, take a midterm and final test, and produce written responses to many of the ideas presented in the course readings.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. students who complete the matriculation process after the fall 2018 semester. Students who completed the matriculation process by fall 2018 can take this course for the elective credits.

Required Textbook:

  • Newton, J. M., Ferris, D. R., Goh, C. C. M, Grabe, W., Stoller, F. L., & Vandergrift, L. (2018). Teaching English to second language learners in academic contexts: Reading, writing, listening, and speaking. New York, NY: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)
  • Hyland, K. (2015). Teaching and researching writing. (3rd ed.). New York, NY: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

*A reading packet will be provided. The recommended texts are strongly suggested.

Recommended Textbook:

*A new edition of Grabe & Stoller, Teaching and researching reading (3rd ed.) will be published by Routledge in October 2019. Waiting for the new edition is strongly recommended.

Additional readings will be provided in a course reading packet.

TESL 5614:

Current Approaches to Teaching English Language Learners

Professor:
Dr. Paul Leeming
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
September 5 - December 5
Day & Time:
Thursday, 18:00-21:00

The session 13 on Thursday, November 28 is cancelled. Students will be required to attend Dr. Bostwick’s weekend seminar on Saturday, November 23 from 14:00-17:00, in lieu of session 13.

The purpose of this course is to enable participants to develop an awareness of second language theory and classroom practice. Issues to be investigated include: an account of the central processes of learning and the conditions believed to promote language acquisition; the elements of a language learning curriculum and their relation to the processes by which learners acquire language; past methods and current approaches to language teaching; and various types of materials and activities believed to foster acquisition. Participants will be encouraged to consider how these issues relate to their own classroom contexts and develop a personal set of teaching principles. Sessions will cover topics such as the roles of input, output, form-focused instruction, fluency development, motivation, and task-based language teaching.

In addition to required reading, participants will take a mid-term and a final examination, make written responses to important issues discussed in the course, lead a number of small group discussions, write a course paper focused on a topic related to the course, and make a short, oral presentation. Students will also be required to attend Dr. Bostwick’s weekend seminar on Saturday, November 23 from 14:00-17:00, in lieu of the session on November 28.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

Recommended Textbook:

Additional readings will be provided in a course reading packet.

EDUC 8273:

ESP: Exploring the Concepts, Pedagogy and Current Issues of Genres for Professional Discourse

Professor:
Dr. Judy Noguchi
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
September 4 - December 4
Day & Time:
Wednesday, 18:00-21:00

Communication in the professions, be it for people engaged in business, academia, medicine or research, requires a common language, which in today’s globally connected world is English. For a professional whose native language is not English, this can be a barrier to active participation in the target discourse community. One way to resolve this issue is by using concepts and tools developed for ESP (English for Specific Purposes). Criticism has been lodged against ESP as being too formulaic and stifling of creativity but such concerns will be discussed with consideration of the reasons underlying the use of professional genres. One powerful tool to aid the understanding of genre features is offered by corpus linguistics. We will explore the possibilities of using corpora and concordance programs to aid tertiary level teaching and learning of the various genres needed for professional discourse.

The course will take a hands-on approach to exploring the concepts and issues of ESP today. Students will be expected to report on reading assignments (from the textbooks and selected journal articles), complete a course project related to the topics and issues discussed in the course, and give a 15- to 20-minute final presentation to share their work with other participants.

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed and Ph.D. degrees.

Required Textbook:

TESOL Special Projects - Distinguished Lecturer Series

This Lecturer Series will consist of three weekend seminars. Each seminar course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees. The first three hours of each seminar (Saturday, 14:00 to 17:00) are free and open to the public. Weekend seminars are free for Master's and doctoral graduates of Temple University Japan Campus for auditing; the fee for other weekend auditors is ¥13,000. This course can be used as elective credit (1 credit) for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees.

ENES 8655: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 1):

Corpus Use in Education and Research

Professor:
Dr. Atsushi Mizumoto (Kansai University, Japan)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, September 21, 14:00-21:00
 
Sunday, September 22, 10:00-17:00

The development of corpus linguistics has had a tremendous influence on the field of applied linguistics. The aim of this seminar is to introduce the participants to a number of topics related to corpus use for educational and research purposes such as data-driven learning (DDL). As the seminar will cover corpus-based approaches from both theoretical and practical perspectives, the lecturer will talk about usage-based theory as an underlying principle and using a variety of tools and online resources such as AntConc, Just the Word, Hyper Collocation, WORD AND PHRASE, and AWSuM for teaching in the classroom and writing research papers for publication. In addition, the lecturer will discuss how to incorporate strategy instruction in second language (L2) writing courses because using those resources will be an important learning strategy for L2 writers. Participants who will stay after the opening session are expected to bring their own laptop computer for hands-on sessions.

ENES 8656: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 2):

Analyzing Rating Data Using a Many-Facet Rasch Measurement Approach

Professor:
Dr. Carol Myford (The University of Illinois at Chicago, U.S.A.)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, October 19, 14:00-21:00
 
Sunday, October 20, 10:00-17:00

In performance assessment settings, raters use measurement tools such as rating scales or scoring rubrics to evaluate students’ performances or products. Raters assign their ratings based upon information that they gather and synthesize as they examine each performance or product. However, by virtue of their being human, raters sometimes unavoidably introduce error (rater effects) into the assessment process.

Data analysts can employ a many-facet Rasch measurement (MFRM) approach for analyzing ratings to detect and measure the impact of rater effects such as leniency/severity, central tendency, and halo effect on the ratings. Using the output from these analyses, administrators in charge of monitoring quality control for assessment systems obtain detailed, practical information about how various “facets” (e.g., students, raters, rating criteria) of their assessment systems are performing. They can use that information to help them determine to what extent their systems are under statistical control and to initiate meaningful changes in an effort to improve their systems.

This seminar will introduce participants to the many-facet Rasch measurement approach for analyzing ratings. Topics we will cover include the following:

  • The role of raters and their influence in open-ended assessments
  • Rater effects that can influence ratings
  • Statistical approaches that researchers have used to analyze rating data and characterize rater performance
  • The conceptual and mathematical foundations of many-facet Rasch measurement
  • Group-level and individual-level questions that a MFRM analysis can answer
  • Creating a data file for a MFRM analysis
  • Preparing a specification file for a MFRM analysis
  • Running MFRM analyses and reformatting output
  • Creating judging plans
  • Making sense of output from MFRM analyses
  • MFRM anchoring procedures for equating
  • Strategies for resolving disconnected subsets issues
  • Conducting bias interaction analyses
  • Hybrid MFRM models and their uses

Prerequisite Skills and Knowledge Needed for Seminar Participation
The target seminar participants are researchers, statisticians, data analysts, and advanced graduate students who want to learn how to use many-facet Rasch measurement for analyzing rating data.
Having a basic understanding of the conceptual and mathematical foundations of Rasch measurement would be helpful but not required, as would prior experience using Rasch measurement analysis software (e.g., Winsteps).

Computer Software Needed for Participation in the Entire Weekend
Attendees who will attend the entire weekend for this seminar are required to bring a personal computer that is running the Windows 7, 8 or 10 operating system. The entire weekend attendees will be using Microsoft Word and Excel to create their data files. Therefore, the attendees will need to have these two applications previously installed on their computers. The entire weekend attendees will be running Minifac (Linacre, 2017), the demonstration version of the Facets for Windows computer program. The attendees can download Minifac free of charge from this website: http://www.winsteps.com/minifac.htm

ENES 8657: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 3):

Theory and Practice of Content & Language Integrated Learning (CLIL)

Professor:
Dr. Mike Bostwick (Katoh Gakuen English Immersion, Japan)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday November 23, 14:00-21:00
 
Sunday, November 24, 10:00-17:00

The role of content – how much does it belong in the foreign language class and how it should be integrated with language learning outcomes to promote language learning has been a debate since the 1980’s (Pally, 1999). Since this time an extensive body of research has demonstrated that, “content-based instruction (CBI) is typically more effective than ‘text-based’ instruction across a wide range of L2 instructional contexts.” (Brinton, et al., 2006, p 2).

Like CBI, Content and language integrated learning (CLIL) is the integration of particular content with language teaching aims. It is an innovative, instructional approach in which an “additional language” is interwoven with content to promote second language acquisition. It is based on the principle that successful language learning occurs when students are presented with target language material in meaningful, contextualized forms with the primary focus on acquiring information and knowledge. Content is the organizing principle, and other aspects of language (linguistic structures, vocabulary, language functions) are presented as needed (Snow et al., 1989). The approach can be used with second language learners from elementary school through university.

CLIL is a multifaceted and complex approach to teaching foreign languages. The goal of the seminar is to clarify some of these complexities and identify key features of this approach. Participants in the seminar will not only explore the theoretical underpinnings of CLIL they will also learn 15 ‘high impact’ instructional strategies used in highly effective CBI/CLIL programs that can also be applied across a wide range of foreign language teaching contexts.

Doctoral Courses

For Ph.D 2012 and 2015 students only.

EDUC 9998:

Dissertation Proposal Writing

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1-3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

This course is for those Ph.D. students who have passed the Qualifying Examination and working on their dissertation proposal.

The Ph.D. students are required to take Culminating Courses (6 semester hours overall, minimum 2 semester hours of EDUC 9999). Culminating Courses: Qualifying Exam Preparation Course (EDUC 9994), Proposal Writing Course (EDUC 9998) and Dissertation Writing Course (EDUC 9999).

EDUC 9999:

Dissertation Writing

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1-3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

Minimum 2 credit hours of EDUC 9999 are required for the Ph.D. Students.

Students wishing to register for this course should obtain permission from the professor and complete the registration process during the registration period.

EDUC 9282:

Research Apprenticeship

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

If you wish to take an Apprenticeship course, you first need to write a 300-400-word abstract of your proposed project (unless you are assisting a professor with one of his or her studies). This abstract should include basic information such as (a) the gaps in the literature you are addressing, (b) the purpose(s) of the study, (c) specific research questions, and (d) your methodology, including information about the participants, instruments, procedures, and the analyses you will perform. You will then need to send the abstract to the advisor you wish to work with (Consult the list of Apprenticeship advisors on the registration form to see who is available), and if the advisor approves your plan, you can then register for the course with that advisor.

For Ph.D. 2017 students only

Students in the Ph.D. program are required to take the doctoral seminars listed below.

EPSY 8827:

Dissertation Proposal Writing

Professor:
Dr. David Beglar
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
September 13 - December 7
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00-21:00
Saturday, 14:00-17:00

For more details about the schedule, please check the schedule chart below.

The primary goal of this course is to familiarize participants with the requirements and organization of quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-methods doctoral dissertations at Temple University by closely analyzing the formal macro-organization of doctoral dissertations as well as more detailed aspects of individual dissertation chapters and sections. Accomplishing this goal involves looking closely at (a) the dissertation abstract, (b) the introductory chapter, (c) the construction of an effective academic literature review, (d) the organization and content of a methodology chapter, with a particular emphasis on research design, (e) the reporting of quantitative and qualitative results, (f) and APA formatting and writing conventions. Course participants will meet with the instructor outside of the class to discuss their proposed study and to make progress reports, discuss course readings in small groups, analyze published research papers, make multiple small-group presentations on various aspects of their proposed dissertation study, and submit multiple short papers that feed directly into the ultimate goal of the course: the production of a well-organized and complete dissertation proposal that can be successfully defended in the following academic year. Course participants should read the first four chapters of each of the course textbooks before the first session.

This course is required for the Ph.D. degree.

Required Textbook:

Dr. Beglar's Class Schedule

Session Day Date Class Time Note
1 Friday September 13, 2019 18:00-21:00  
2 Saturday September 14, 2019 14:00-17:00  
3 Friday September 27, 2019 18:00-21:00  
4 Saturday September 28, 2019 14:00-17:00  
5 Friday October 11, 2019 18:00-21:00  
6 Saturday October 12, 2019 14:00-17:00  
7 Friday October 25, 2019 18:00-21:00  
8 Saturday October 26, 2019 14:00-17:00  
9 Friday November 8, 2019 18:00-21:00  
10 Saturday November 9, 2019 14:00-17:00  
11 Friday November 22, 2019 18:00-21:00  
12 Saturday November 23, 2019 10:00-13:00 *Time Changed due to Seminar 3
13 Friday December 6, 2019 18:00-21:00  
14 Saturday December 7, 2019 14:00-17:00  

TESL 8644:

Individual Differences in Language Learning

Professor:
Dr. James Sick
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
September 6 - November 30
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00-21:00
Saturday, 14:00-17:00

For more details about the schedule, please check the schedule chart below.

The session 10 on Saturday, November 2 was cancelled due to the JALT 2019. The make-up session is scheduled to be held on Saturday, November 30 (10-13).

The blanket term “individual differences” refers to the cognitive and affective attributes that influence learning behavior, rate of progress, and ultimate attainment. This course will provide an overview of individual differences (IDs) hypothesized to influence second language learning and acquisition, drawing from both the canonical literature of individual differences in second language learning as well as the broader field of differential psychology. Primary attention will be given to the influence of personality, aptitude and abilities, motivation, self-regulation, learning strategies, self-concept, and anxiety on second language learning. Additionally, we will consider biological versus environmental origins of IDs, the stability of IDs over time, and how IDs function as predictor or moderator variables within multivariate models of second language learning. Participants should purchase and read Chapters 1-4 of Cooper and Chapters 1-2 of Dörnyei and Ryan as preparation for the first weekend sessions. Williams, Mercer, and Ryan (optional textbook) has a pedagogical rather than research orientation but provides an excellent review of the theories and terminology of social and educational psychology as they pertain to language learning. Chapters 1-3 are recommended as pre-reading for the course. Other chapters will be useful supplements to assigned readings. Several class sessions will be devoted to using confirmatory factor analysis, structural equation modeling, and linear growth curve models to test models of individual differences. Participants should have a computer with AMOS installed. A textbook devoted to SEM using AMOS, such as Byrne, will be useful, but similar resources can also be found on the web.

This course is required for the Ph.D. degree.

Required Textbook:

Recommended Textbook:

  • Williams, M., Mercer, S., & Ryan, S. (2015). Exploring psychology in language learning and teaching. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)
  • Byrne, B. M. (2016). Structural equation modeling with AMOS: Basic concepts, applications, and programming. (3rd ed.). New York, NY: Routledge* (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

*Instead of purchasing the above book, students can use any similar book relating to SEM using Amos.

Dr. Sick’s Class Schedule

Session Day Date Class Time Note
1 Friday September 6, 2019 18:00-21:00  
2 Saturday September 7, 2019 14:00-17:00  
3 Friday September 20, 2019 18:00-21:00  
4 Saturday September 21, 2019 10:00-13:00 *Time Changed due to Seminar 1
5 Friday October 4, 2019 18:00-21:00  
6 Saturday October 5, 2019 14:00-17:00  
7 Friday October 18, 2019 18:00-21:00  
8 Saturday October 19, 2019 10:00-13:00 *Time Changed due to Seminar 2
9 Friday November 1, 2019 18:00-21:00  
10 Saturday November 2, 2019 14:00-17:00 *Class is cancelled due to the JALT 2019. Make-up session is scheduled to be held on Sat, 11/30 (10-13).
10 Friday November 15, 2019 18:00-21:00  
11 Saturday November 16, 2019 14:00-17:00  
12 Friday November 29, 2019 18:00-21:00  
13 Saturday November 30, 2019 10:00-13:00 *Time Changed
14 Saturday November 30, 2019 14:00-17:00