Past Course Descriptions (Tokyo)

Spring Semester 2021

FLED 5470:

Introduction to the Study of TESOL

Professor:
Dr. Ron Martin
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
January 14 - April 8
Day & Time:
Thursday, 18:00-21:00

As the first class meeting for this course is on Thursday, January 14, after the add/drop period ends, the office will accept drops only for this course until 21:30 on Thursday, January 14 (after the first class meeting ends). Students who wish to drop this course after attending the first class meeting must inform the office via email by the deadline. Interested students can access the course syllabus for this course from Tokyo Center during the spring 2021 Add/Drop Period.

Beginning students of TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) usually have two purposes: (1) to learn the academic skills they need to succeed at graduate work and (2) to discover the best ways to teach English to non-native speakers. In this course, students will achieve the first purpose, mastering necessary academic skills, while getting a head start on the second, understanding methods and issues of TESOL study. Academic skills include getting the most out of lectures and research articles, taking notes, accessing library and internet resources, answering essay test questions, giving presentations, and writing papers using proper forms of citation, paraphrasing and bibliographic references.

This course is designed for students who are new to the Master of Science in Education program, who have little or no experience studying in an English-language university, or who are not familiar with formal academic writing style (APA style). For such students, this course is recommended as the first course in the M.S.Ed. curriculum. Registrants who are not native speakers of English should have a TOEFL score of at least 550 on the paper-based test or 80 on the internet-based test.

There will be 13 regular class sessions for this course and in addition to the regular class sessions, all the students will be required to attend any one of the three Distinguished Lecturer Weekend Seminars (only the first three hours of the Saturday public session) scheduled in spring. The professor will provide you with further details about the seminar requirement later in the classroom.

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2020). Publication manual of the American psychological association (7th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)
  • Richards, J. C., & Schmidt, R. W. (2010). Longman dictionary of language teaching and applied linguistics (4th ed.). Oxon, UK: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

Recommended textbook is available as electronic resource via TU library portal

TESL 5611:

Applied Language Study I: Phonology and the Lexicon

Professor:
Dr. Tomoko Nemoto
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
January 12 - April 13
Day & Time:
Tuesday, 18:00-21:00

The primary purpose of this course is to introduce students to the basics of English phonetics and phonology, with an emphasis on areas of interest to language teachers. The course objectives are to: (1) introduce the basic concepts of phonetics and phonology; (2) provide practice in transcribing and analyzing the sound systems of native speakers and learners of English; (3) consider the place of pronunciation teaching in a foreign language curriculum and instructional approaches; (4) examine methods of assessing pronunciation; and (5) look at the relationship between pronunciation and other language skills. Students will complete a number of weekly assignments, take a mid-term examination and final examination, and conduct a project in which the speech of an English language learner is analyzed, a particular aspect of the English sound system is taught, and the results reported.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Celce-Murcia, M., Brinton, D. M., & Goodwin, J. M. (2010). Teaching pronunciation: A course book and reference guide. (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Cambridge University Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2020). Publication manual of the American psychological association. (7th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

A Kindle edition is also available.

TESL 5616:

Designing Assessment and Curriculum for Multicultural Students

Professor:
Dr. Robert Nelson
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
January 6 - April 7
Day & Time:
Wednesday, 18:00-21:00

The first major purpose of this course is to give students the skills they need to develop and design language courses in all skill areas, with a special focus on materials design and assessment practices. The second purpose is to familiarize students with the states of the art in meaning-driven teaching methods (i.e., Task-, Project-, Theme-, and Content-based teaching) while respecting the importance of traditional grammar and vocabulary teaching to EFL audiences. These general principles form a framework within which students are introduced to the principles of cognitive linguistics that are relevant to teaching (e.g., construction and cognitive grammar, construal, and embodied meaning and metaphor). Students will learn to integrate their own situated observations with research findings to generate topically relevant material for any age group that meets the criteria laid out by any curriculum they follow. This material (lesson and task plans, texts, recordings, etc.) will support the teaching of the four skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) as well as the linguistic competencies of English. That is, students will leave the class able to employ the principles of meaning based linguistics and pedagogy to create motivating learning experiences that are flexible enough to fluidly switch between form and function foci. Course requirements include completing weekly readings, contributing to group discussions, completing a final examination and course projects, and compiling a teaching portfolio.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

Recommended Textbook:

TESL 5618:

Second Language Development

Professor:
Dr. Tomoko Nemoto
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
January 8 - April 9
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00-21:00

The overarching purpose of this course is to canvass ten contemporary theories that are central to modern discussions of second language development (SLD) and to thereby provide the participants with an opportunity to further develop and consolidate their understanding of SLD, models of language representation and use, and issues that directly affect classroom teaching. In the first part of the course, we look at (a) early theories of second language development, (b) orders and sequences of acquisition, and (c) language transfer. In the second part of the course, the focus is on a number of theoretical positions, including (a) Usage-based approaches, (b) Skill-acquisition theory, and (c) Input processing. Finally, in the third part of the course, we read about (a) input, interaction, and output; (b) Sociocultural theory, and (c) instructed second language development, which concerns the practical application of a number of strands in the field of second language development. Students will participate in and lead numerous small group discussions, produce a synthesis of the course readings, take in-class examinations, and make a presentation on a self-selected SLD topic.

The course is best taken by students who have already completed TESL 5611, TESL 5612, TESL 5613, TESL 5614 and TESL 5616.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • VanPatten, B., Keating, G. D., & Wulff, S. (Eds.). (2020). Theories in second language acquisition: An introduction. (3rd ed.). New York, NY: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2020). Publication manual of the American psychological association. (7th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

A Kindle edition is also available.

ENES 8623:

Cognitive Linguistics and Foreign Language Teaching

Professor:
Dr. Masahiro Takimoto
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
January 11 - April 12
Day & Time:
Monday, 18:00-21:00

The course overviews the ways that cognitive linguistics can be applied to facilitate foreign language research and teaching. The first part of the course introduces the basics of cognitive linguistic theory in a way that is geared toward foreign language researchers and teachers with a special emphasis on the relationship between conceptualization and embodied experience, mental imagery, conceptual metaphor and categorization. The second part of the course reviews the existing literature on the application of cognitive linguistics in foreign language teaching and discusses experimental evidence of the usefulness of applying basic notions of cognitive linguistics presented in the first part of the course ― mental imagery, conceptual metaphor, category formation, and usage-based language learning. Finally, the course provides a summary of the main findings of current experimental studies and indicates additional concepts from cognitive linguistics that offer the potential for further experimentation and application. Specifically, the course offers a brief overview of spatial concept-oriented metaphor awareness-raising approach and its application for future research.

This course can be used as an elective credit for M.S.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees.

Required Textbook:

Recommended Textbook:

ENES 8645:

Teaching and Learning Vocabulary

Professor:
Dr. David Beglar
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
January 8 - April 9
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00-21:00

The course is focused on teaching, learning, and researching vocabulary (i.e., single words and multi-word units) in a second language. We will look at a wide range of topics, such as what is involved in knowing a word; how much vocabulary is needed when using the four major skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing; acquiring; using specialized vocabulary; learning words from context; using dictionaries effectively; and; learning multi-word units. The course has two primary aims. The first aim is for participants to become familiar with the wide variety of research that makes up the field of second language vocabulary acquisition. The second aim, which rests on the foundation provided by the first aim, is to develop the knowledge and skills necessary to create an effective plan for teaching vocabulary in a course or in a foreign-language curriculum.

Course participants will read extensively, complete in-class tasks regarding vocabulary teaching and learning, participate in and lead small group discussions, conduct a course project by analyzing the lexical composition of a language teaching textbook, test (e.g., entrance examination), or written materials designed for native English speakers. Participants will also make an in-class presentation about their course project. By the end of the course, course participants should be aware of the major issues pertinent to teaching, learning, and researching second-language vocabulary, be able to design a vocabulary component for a language course, and advise teachers and learners on vocabulary learning strategies. Course participants should read the first seven chapters in Learning Vocabulary in Another Language before the first class meeting.

This course can be used as an elective credit for M.S.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees.

Required Textbook:

EPSY 8625:

Introduction to Research Methodology

Professor:
Dr. James Sick
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
January 14 - April 15
Day & Time:
Thursday, 18:00-21:00

As the first class meeting for this course is on Thursday, January 14, after the add/drop period ends, the office will accept drops only for this course until 21:30 on Thursday, January 14 (after the first class meeting ends). Students who wish to drop this course after attending the first class meeting must inform the office via email by the deadline. Interested students can access the course syllabus for this course from Tokyo Center during the spring 2021 Add/Drop Period.

This course will present a broad overview of research methods and protocols currently used in applied linguistics and educational psychology. The primary goals are to assist teachers in becoming better informed consumers of research and to establish a foundation for actively conducting research in the future.

By the end of the course, students will attain a general understanding of the quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods research protocols currently employed in applied linguistics. In addition to the textbook, students will critically read example research articles in order to gain familiarity with the presentation of research results and to evaluate the validity and appropriateness of the methods employed. Topics to be covered include the purposes, strengths, and limitations of different research designs, ethical standards when conducting research with human subjects, data collection methods, coding and interpretation of qualitative data, reliability and validity of quantitative data, assumptions underlying statistical analyses, and basic principles of sampling and probability. Assessment will be based on weekly online quizzes and two short written projects.

Quantitative analysis techniques such as descriptive statistics, correlation, t-tests, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and factor analysis will be introduced and practiced using the free JASP software package and supplied data sets. Students should have a laptop computer, either Mac or Windows, to bring to class on days when we do data analysis.

This course can be used as an elective credit for M.S.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees.

Required Textbook:

  • Paltridge, B., & Phakiti, A. (2015). Research methods in applied linguistics: A practical resource. (2nd ed.). London, UK: Bloomsbury USA Academic. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)
  • Brown, J. D. (2016). Statistics corner: Questions and answers about language testing statistics. Tokyo, Japan: JALT Testing and Evaluation SIG. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

EDUC 9993:

Master’s Comprehensive Examination

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
By Arrangement

This course is required for M.S.Ed. students who matriculated in or after Spring 2019. Students are required to register for this course in the semester they take the M.S.Ed. Comprehensive Examination. This course is a Pass/Fail course. If the student is taking the January Comprehensive Exam, the student must register for this course in the spring semester. If the student is taking the May Comprehensive Exam, the student must register for this course in the summer semester.

Students who matriculated before Spring 2019, but wish to take this course as part of their 30 credits requirement must consult with the Administrative Director prior to their registration.

Doctoral Courses

EDUC 9991:

Research Apprenticeship

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

Ph.D. students are required to take two 3-credit Research Apprenticeship courses.

If you wish to take an apprenticeship course, you first need to write a 300-400-word abstract of your proposed project (unless you are assisting a professor with one of his or her studies). This abstract should include basic information such as (a) the gaps in the literature you are addressing, (b) the purpose(s) of the study, (c) specific research questions, and (d) your methodology, including information about the participants, instruments, procedures, and the analyses you will perform. You will then need to send the abstract to the advisor you wish to work with (Consult the list of Apprenticeship advisors on the registration form to see who is available), and if the advisor approves your plan, you can then register for the course with that advisor.

EDUC 9998:

Dissertation Proposal Design

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1-3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

This course is for those Ph.D. students who have passed the Preliminary Examination and working on their dissertation proposal.

The Ph.D. students are required to take Culminating Courses (6 semester hours overall, minimum 2 semester hours of EDUC 9999). Culminating Courses: Preliminary Preparation Course (EDUC 9994), Dissertation Proposal Design Course (EDUC 9998) and Doctor of Education Dissertation Course (EDUC 9999).

EDUC 9999:

Doctor of Education Dissertation

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1-6 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

Minimum 2 credit hours of EDUC 9999 are required for the Ph.D. students.

Students wishing to register for this course should obtain permission from the professor and complete the registration process during the registration period.

Students in the Ph.D. 2020 Cohort are required to take both doctoral courses listed below in spring 2021.

EDUC 8275:

Introduction to Qualitative Research

Professor:
Dr. Eton Churchill
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
Januray 15 - April 10
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00-21:00
Saturday, 14:00-17:00

For more details about the schedule, please check the schedule chart below.

This course introduces participants to qualitative research methods and related theoretical frameworks used to investigate second language learning. We will begin by reviewing the historical and philosophical roots of qualitative inquiry. We will then examine how different qualitative research approaches have been employed to investigate questions in the field of second language acquisition. Approaches that will be covered include language socialization, the ethnography of communication, interpretive qualitative research, narrative inquiry, critical ethnography, and the analysis of (multimodal) interaction. Theoretical frameworks associated with each of these approaches will be introduced. A major focus of this course will be to consider methodological and ethical issues related to negotiating access, interviewing, observation, data management and analysis, and representation. Building on the class lectures, our readings and discussions, participants will conduct a small scale study to obtain practical experience working within a specific approach to qualitative research in SLA.

Course activities will be organized around lectures, group discussions, student presentations, and participants’ research projects. Major assignments include a group presentation on an approach to qualitative research in applied linguistics, three writing assignments involving data collection and analysis, and an oral presentation on each student’s research project.

As this course requires participants to negotiate access to and collect data within a social scene, participants are strongly encouraged to begin considering what sites are available and what related research topics are of interest to them prior to the start of this course.

This course is required for the Ph.D. degree.

Required Textbook:

An additional set of readings will be available at the beginning of the course.

Dr. Churchill’s Class Schedule

Session Day Date Class Time Note
1 Friday January 15, 2021 18:00-21:00  
2 Saturday January 16, 2021 14:00-17:00  
3 Friday January 29, 2021 18:00-21:00  
4 Saturday January 30, 2021 14:00-17:00  
5 Friday February 12, 2021 18:00-21:00  
6 Saturday February 13, 2021 14:00-17:00  
7 Friday February 26, 2021 18:00-21:00  
8 Saturday February 27, 2021 14:00-17:00  
9 Friday March 12, 2021 18:00-21:00  
10 Saturday March 13, 2021 14:00-17:00  
11 Friday March 26, 2021 18:00-21:00  
12 Saturday March 27, 2021 14:00-17:00  
13 Friday April 9, 2021 18:00-21:00  
14 Saturday April 10, 2021 14:00-17:00  

TESL 8626:

Researching Reading and Writing

Professor:
Dr. Robert Nelson
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
January 8- April 3
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00-21:00
Saturday, 14:00-17:00

For more details about the schedule, please check the schedule chart below.

This course offers an overview of the underlying concepts and skills needed for quantitative research in ESL and EFL literacy development. Students will review the current best practices for the research in reading and writing in English as a Foreign/Second/Other Language as well as in-depth knowledge of learner text/corpus linguistics and psycholinguistic reaction time testing as applied to reading research. This class will rely primarily on the academic literature to ensure the timeliness of the methods discussed. The overarching goal of the class is for students to acquire a familiarity with research methods sufficient to enable them to make novel contributions; however, we will review some current issues in pedagogy, focusing on those that are in need of greater empirical support (e.g., the written corrective feedback debate). Specific topics will include reading comprehension, vocabulary development, the psycholinguistics of reading, the nature of academic literacy, the writing process, the effectiveness of written feedback, and reading and writing assessment. We will also focus on practical techniques in corpus and text linguistics, which will require the student to gain some facility with the R language and the R studio development environment. Assignments will include research proposals complete with thorough design, compilation and analysis of learner corpus data, and various R projects. Students will also learn PEBL, a language for the design, construction, and analysis of reaction time experiments. With PEBL, students will design a reaction time test, deliver it, and analyze the results with an appropriate statistical model.

This course is required for the Ph. D. degree.

Required Textbook:

Dr. Nelson's Class Schedule

Session Day Date Class Time Note
1 Friday January 8, 2021 18:00-21:00  
2 Saturday January 9, 2021 14:00-17:00  
3 Friday January 22, 2021 18:00-21:00  
4 Saturday January 23, 2021 14:00-17:00  
5 Friday February 5, 2021 18:00-21:00  
6 Saturday February 6, 2021 14:00-17:00  
7 Friday February 19, 2021 18:00-21:00  
8 Saturday February 20, 2021 14:00-17:00  
9 Friday March 5, 2021 18:00-21:00  
10 Saturday March 6, 2021 14:00-17:00  
11 Friday March 19, 2021 18:00-21:00  
12 Saturday March 20, 2021 14:00-17:00  
13 Friday April 2, 2021 18:00-21:00  
14 Saturday April 3, 2021 14:00-17:00  

TESOL Special Projects - Distinguished Lecturer Series

This Lecturer Series will consist of three weekend seminars. Each seminar course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees. The first three hours of each seminar (Saturday, 14:00 to 17:00) are free and open to the public. Weekend seminars are free for master’s and doctoral graduates of Temple University Japan Campus for auditing; the fee for other weekend auditors is ¥13,000. In light of the global impact of COVID-19, the weekend seminars for this semester will take different formats as explained in the following descriptions:

ENES 8655: Seminar 1

The Place of Extensive Reading and Listening in and EFL Curriculum

Professor:
Dr. Rob Waring (Notre Dame Seishin University, Japan)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
3-hour online Zoom sessions for four days
Saturday, January 23 from 14:00 to 17:00
Sunday, January 24 from 14:00 to 17:00
Saturday, January 30 from 14:00 to 17:00
Sunday, January 31 from 14:00 to 17:00

Students taking this seminar for credit must attend all four days.

Pre-sign up (or course registration for those who are taking this seminar for credit) is required for anybody attending the public session on Saturday, January 23 from 14:00 to 17:00. The sign-up process must be completed through "Distinguished Lecturer Series Seminar Sign-Up Form" that is available on TUJ Grad Ed website. The sign-up deadline is Friday, January 22 at 12:00. The public session Zoom link will be provided to those people who completed the sign-up (or course registration) process between 13:00-13:50 on Saturday, January 23.

This session will first outline what a typical EFL curriculum should cover at various ability levels and ages. The lecturer then will investigate how typical courses structure learning tasks and material to attempt to achieve these goals and will reflect on how they often may be underserving the learners. The lecturer then will build up a picture of how extensive reading (ER) and extensive listening (EL) help fill in many gaps in EFL curricula by providing the much-needed input, repetition and recycling needed to deepen and consolidate learning. This review will also look at what needs to be done to prepare learners to read and listen extensively. The lecturer also will discuss the limits of an ER approach particularly for more specialist topics, and at the more advanced levels and suggest approaches and strategies to ensure effective learning.

The session will then review the state-of-the-art of ER and EL research in order to understand the current state of play. Participants will be invited to discuss what the lecturer and they still need to find out by composing a research agenda. The lecturer then look at some examples of ER and EL research to highlight commonly-made pitfalls in research design. Participants will come up with some principles of how to effectively design ER and EL research so as to avoid as many pitfalls as possible. Participants will then select several research questions and propose how these may be examined experimentally, present these to fellow classmates, and submit a paper describing and justifying their proposal.

ENES 8656: Seminar 2

Conversation Analysis and Its Practical Application to Language Teaching

Professor:
Dr. Donald Carroll (Shikoku Gakuin University, Japan)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
3-hour online Zoom sessions for four days
 
Saturday, February 13 from 14:00 to 17:00
Sunday, February 14 from 14:00 to 17:00
Saturday, February 20 from 14:00 to 17:00
Sunday, February 21 from 14:00 to 17:00

Students taking this seminar for credit must attend all four days.

In recognition of the government's declaration of a state of emergency in Tokyo and Osaka, the travel advisory between Tokyo and Osaka, and the current COVID-19 development in Japan, this seminar will be conducted online. Pre-sign up (or course registration for those who are taking this seminar for credit) is required for anybody attending the public session on Saturday, February 13 from 14:00 to 17:00. The sign-up process must be completed through "Distinguished Lecturer Series Seminar Sign-Up Form" that is available on TUJ Grad Ed website. The sign-up deadline is Friday, February 12 at 12:00. The public session Zoom link will be provided to those people who completed the sign-up (or course registration) process between 13:00-13:50 on Saturday, February 13.

The field of conversation analysis is now into its sixth decade of empirical research into the structure and social order of interaction. The first generation of researchers would be pleased and astounded at how much is now known across such a wide range of contexts, languages, and interaction types, from mundane daily conversation to talk-at-work to pedagogic interaction, both in classrooms and in-the-wild. Yet most of these empirical observations remain unknown to the overwhelming majority of language teachers worldwide, not to mention textbook authors and publishers.

The twin goals of this seminar are to introduce the fundamental orientations and working practices of ethnomethodological conversation analysis and then examine how the resulting observations on interaction are of immediate relevance to the teaching of an additional language, specifically TESOL. The seminar will focus on several broad and particularly well-researched aspects of empirically observable interactional order, aspects that are of immediate relevance to language teachers and language learners and yet often stand in direct contraction to orthodox teaching materials and syllabi.

In addition to an initial presentation, the seminar will include a practical workshop component during which participants can try out practical ideas that can be immediately incorporated into their own teaching and/or language learning.

ENES 8657: Seminar 3

Seeking for the Interface between SLA Research and Language Teaching

Professor:
Dr. Shinichi Izumi (Sophia University, Japan)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
3-hour online Zoom sessions for four days
Saturday, February 27 from 14:00 to 17:00
Sunday, February 28 from 14:00 to 17:00
Saturday, March 6 from 14:00 to 17:00
Sunday, March 7 from 14:00 to 17:00

Students taking this seminar for credit must attend all four days.

In recognition of the government's extension of a state of emergency in Tokyo and Osaka, the travel advisory between Tokyo and Osaka, and the current COVID-19 development in Japan, this seminar will be conducted online. Pre-sign up (or course registration for those who are taking this seminar for credit) is required for anybody attending the public session on Saturday, February 27 from 14:00 to 17:00. The sign-up process must be completed through "Distinguished Lecturer Series Seminar Sign-Up Form" that is available on TUJ Grad Ed website. The sign-up deadline is Friday, February 26 at 12:00. The public session Zoom link will be provided to those people who completed the sign-up (or course registration) process between 13:00-13:50 on Saturday, February 27.

In this seminar, the lecturer would like to discuss issues related to the interface between Second Language Acquisition (SLA) research and language teaching (ELT). It is a welcoming thing that SLA has finally become a necessary part of the national teacher license curriculum in Japan, and universities nationwide have thus started to offer courses in SLA to prospective language teachers. However, what is needed is not simply to make SLA a mere “knowledge base” for language teaching, but to actively use such knowledge by critically examining our own learning and teaching in light of what SLA research has uncovered about the intricate processes of L2 development. This may be somewhat similar to the still controversial issues in SLA research concerning the interface between metalinguistic explicit knowledge and communicable implicit knowledge, that is, whether and how the two types of knowledge interact with each other to enable better learning. It is the lecturer’s contention that, instead of an either/or answer, this all depends on how one tries to bridge the two in the course of one’s learning (and teaching)—an issue that he wishes to discuss in some detail as part of his talk in the seminar. In a similar manner, it is incumbent on us to actively seek for ways to connect SLA research and language teaching if the lecturer and attendants wish to create the interface and derive any benefits from it.

In this seminar, the lecturer would like to first start off by introducing what research in First Language Acquisition has revealed about the processes of L1 acquisition, discuss some major theoretical approaches to L1 acquisition, and later use these as a basis for examining and discussing issues raised in SLA research and language teaching. In the latter part of the seminar, the lecturer would like to introduce a Soft CLIL (Content and Language Integrated Learning) lesson for high school in Japan as a way to apply SLA research findings/insights to practical classroom teaching.

No prior knowledge of SLA is required to take this seminar. Anyone who wishes to seek for the interface between SLA and language teaching are welcome to join in.