Past Course Descriptions (Tokyo)

Summer Session I 2017

FLED 5470:

Introduction to the Study of TESOL

Professor:
Dr. Ron Martin
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 10 - August 9
Day & Time:
Wednesday, 18:00 - 21:00

In lieu of Session 4 (May 31), students are required to attend one of the summer weekend seminars and the professor will have students write a homework assignment about it.

Beginning students of TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) usually have two purposes: (1) to learn the academic skills they need to succeed at graduate work and (2) to discover the best ways to teach English to non-native speakers. In this course, students will achieve the first purpose, mastering necessary academic skills, while getting a head start on the second, understanding methods and issues of TESOL study. Academic skills include getting the most out of lectures and research articles, taking notes, accessing library and internet resources, answering essay test questions, giving presentations, and writing papers using proper forms of citation, paraphrasing and bibliographic references.

This course is designed for students who are new to the Master of Science in Education program, who have little or no experience studying in an English-language university, or who are not familiar with formal academic writing style (APA style). For such students, this course is recommended as the first course in the M.S.Ed. curriculum. Registrants who are not native speakers of English should have a TOEFL score of at least 550 on the paper-based test or 80 on the internet-based test.

There will be 13 regular class sessions for this course and in addition to the regular class sessions, all the students will be required to attend any one of the three Distinguished Lecturer Weekend Seminars (only the first three hours of the Saturday session) scheduled in summer. The professor will provide you with further details about the seminar requirement later in the classroom.

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Lightbown, P. M., & Spada, N. (2013). How Languages Are Learned (Oxford Handbooks for Language Teachers) (4th ed.). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2009). Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)
  • Richards, J. C., & Schmidt, R. (2010). Longman Dictionary of Language Teaching and Applied Linguistics (4th ed.). Oxon, UK: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

TESL 5612:

Applied Language Study II

Professor:
Dr. Tomoko Nemoto
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 9 - June 22
Day & Time:
Tuesday and Thursday, 18:00 - 21:00

The last seventy years have seen a double revolution in linguistic theory: first the triumph of structural linguistics over traditional grammar, then the ascendancy of generative-transformational analysis over structural linguistics. Today, textbooks and teaching materials based on structural linguistic theories and G-T theories are regularly published, even as traditional grammar continues to exert a strong influence on EFL methods and materials.

This course will explore in some detail the theories and practices of traditional grammar, structural linguistics, and generative-transformational analysis. From that technical base, we will study the ways in which each theory influences textbook authors and teaching materials and how EFL and ESL teachers can decide which grammatical theory best explains the way the English language works and which approach offers the best techniques for classroom instruction. We will also consider current notions of case grammar, functional grammar, cognitive linguistics, connectionism, Universal Grammar, and Chomsky's government and binding and minimalist theories.

Course participants should expect to do regular reading assignments, weekly homework in grammatical analysis, take a final examination, and complete a course project, which involves conducting a small-scale study in which a particular grammar point is taught to one or more students over a period of several weeks.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Larsen-Freeman, D., & Celce-Murcia, M. (2015). Grammar Book: Form, Meaning, and Use for English Language Teachers (3rd ed.). Boston, MA: Heinle Cengage Learning. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2009). Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

A set of readings will be available on Blackboard.

TESL 5614:

TESOL Approaches to Teaching English

Professor:
Dr. Robert Nelson
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 8 - June 21
Day & Time:
Monday and Wednesday, 18:00 - 21:00

This course will explore, with breadth and depth, the state of the art in second language teaching pedagogy. The issues covered will be: the history of the field; theories of language learning and the principles connecting these theories to effective classroom practice (e.g., input and output; form-focused, content- and task-based instruction). Special attention will be given to the roles of technology in instruction and assessment and the emerging importance of cultural competence in multi-media text with a critical perspective on the use of games in language learning. Further topics reviewed will cover the evaluation and selection of effective methods and materials, the use of different assessment strategies; the principles underlying the various methods for promoting and assessing complexity, accuracy, and fluency; and perspectives on the Native-Speaker model and its impact on non-Native instructors. Other critical issues covered are learner motivation, assessment, the use of authentic materials and audiences in instruction and assessment, and the inclusion of diverse perspectives in teaching content and practice.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Brown, H. D., & Lee, H. (2015). Teaching by Principles: An Interactive Approach to Language Pedagogy (4th ed.). White Plains, NY: Pearson Education. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)
  • Dörnyei, Z. (2001). Motivational Strategies in the Language Classroom. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2009). Concise Rules of APA Style (Concise Rules of the American Psychological Association (APA) Style) (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

ENES 8645:

Adapting and Developing Language Teaching Materials

Professor:
Dr. David Beglar
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 12 - June 24
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00 - 21:00 and Saturday, 14:00-17:00

High quality language teaching materials are a critical component of any language teaching program. Although textbooks published by major publishers have undergone noticeable improvements in the past four decades, the fact remains that commercially produced materials are designed to be used with a wide variety of learners who often reside in different countries and speak different native languages. For this reason, many instructors find it difficult to find texts that are appropriate for their specific teaching situations. The purpose of this course is to allow students to (a) explore the options available in terms of commercially-produced texts, (b) learn to analyze the strengths and weaknesses of those texts in the light of research on successful second language acquisition, (c) consider how commercially-produced texts can be usefully adapted to specific situations, and (d) plan and produce original materials in an area of their choice (e.g., listening, speaking, reading, or writing). Topics that will be covered in the course include (a) selecting principles for evaluating and producing pedagogical materials, (b) specifying goals and objectives at the levels of curriculum and task, (c) enhancing affective factors such as motivation and confidence, and (d) using strategies for effective page layout.

Students taking this course will be required to actively participate in weekly class activities and produce a final course project of an adapted or completely original teaching unit and a description of the theoretical and/or researched-based underpinnings of those materials. Course participants should read Chapters 1-5 in the textbook before the first class session.

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ed.D./Ph.D. degrees.

Required Textbook:

  • Wiggins, G., & McTighe, J. (2005). Understanding by Design (2nd ed.). Alexandria, VA: Prentice Hall. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

EPSY 8625:

Introduction to Research Methodology

Professor:
Dr. James Sick
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 8 - June 21
Day & Time:
Monday and Wednesday, 18:00 - 21:00

This course will present a broad overview of various research methods currently used in applied linguistics and educational psychology with a view toward assisting teachers in becoming better informed consumers of research, as well as establishing a foundation for actively conducting research in the future. By the end of the course, students will attain a general understanding of the roles of quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods research protocols currently employed in SLA research. In addition to the textbook topics, students will critically read example research articles in order to gain familiarity with the presentation of research results and to evaluate the validity and appropriateness of the methods employed. Topics to be covered include the purposes and limitations of different research designs, methods of data collection, reliability and validity of quantitative variables, assumptions underlying statistical analyses, sampling and probability, and the coding and interpretation of qualitative data. Quantitative analysis techniques such as descriptive statistics, correlation, t-tests, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) will be introduced and practiced using SPSS software and supplied data sets. Assessment will be task-based data analysis and interpretation made available through an online course website.

This course can be used as elective credits for the M.S.Ed. and Ed.D./Ph.D. degrees.

Required Textbook:

  • Trochim, W.M., Donnelly, J. P., & Arora, K. (2015). Research Methods: The Essential Knowledge Base (2nd ed.). Boston, MA : Cengage Learning. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

Recommended Textbook:

  • Brown, J. D. (2016). Statistics Corner: Questions and Answers about Language Testing Statistics. North Charleston, SC: CreateSpace. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)
  • Mackey, A., & Gass, S. M. (2016). Second Language Research: Methodology and Design (2nd ed.). Oxon, UK: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

Summer Session II 2017

TESL 5611:

Applied Language Study I

Professor:
Dr. Tomoko Nemoto
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
June 27 - August 10
Day & Time:
Tuesday and Thursday, 18:00 - 21:00

The primary purpose of this course is to introduce students to the basics of English phonetics and phonology, with an emphasis on areas of interest to language teachers. The course objectives are to: (1) introduce the basic concepts of phonetics and phonology; (2) provide practice in transcribing and analyzing the sound systems of native speakers and learners of English; (3) consider the place of pronunciation teaching in a foreign language curriculum and instructional approaches; (4) examine methods of assessing pronunciation; and (5) look at the relationship between pronunciation and other language skills. Students will complete a number of weekly assignments, participate in numerous group discussions, take a mid-term examination and final examination, and conduct a project in which the speech of an English language learner is analyzed, a particular aspect of the English sound system is taught, and the results reported.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Celce-Murcia, M., Brinton, D.M., Goodwin, J.M., & Griner, B. (2010). Teaching Pronunciation: A Course Book and Reference Guide (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Cambridge University Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2009). Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

A set of readings will be available on Blackboard.

TESL 5616:

Teaching Second and Foreign Language Skills

Professor:
Dr. Robert Nelson
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
June 26 - August 9
Day & Time:
Monday and Wednesday, 18:00 - 21:00

Second and foreign language pedagogy has been gradually moving from being based on subjective opinion about "what works" to a more secure research-based footing that provides indispensable support to the knowledge practitioners gain through teaching experience. The first major purpose of this course is to consider principles of second language teaching and learning that are based on research that has been conducted in the field over the past four decades and to see how these principles do or do not agree with our own intuitions about foreign language learning and teaching. These general principles form the basis of the second major purpose, which is to allow the participants to become more skilled at developing effective, principles-based practices in the teaching of the four major skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) and the linguistic competencies of grammar, vocabulary, and the sound system of English. Participants will become acquainted with principles for teaching each skill area and use these principles to analyze the effectiveness of commercial teaching materials. Course requirements include completing weekly readings, contributing to group discussions, completing a mid-term examination and course projects, and compiling a teaching portfolio.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Brown, H. D., & Lee, H. (2015). Teaching by Principles: An Interactive Approach to Language Pedagogy (4th ed.).White Plains, NY: Pearson Education. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)
  • Tomlinson, B. (2012). Materials Development in Language Teaching (2nd ed.). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)
  • Willis, J., & Willis, D. (2007) Oxford Handbooks for Language Teachers: Doing Task-Based Teaching. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2009). Concise Rules of APA Style (Concise Rules of the American Psychological Association (APA) Style) (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

EDUC 5212:

Curriculum Development for Language Teachers

Professor:
Dr. Robert Nelson
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
June 27 - August 10
Day & Time:
Tuesday and Thursday, 18:00 - 21:00

The primary aim of this course is to provide a broad overview of contemporary issues in the design of educational curricula. It is hoped that accomplishing this aim will lead participants to develop a clearer understanding of the complexities of designing and implementing foreign language curricula and greater confidence and skill in undertaking such a task.

The main topics to be covered include: 1) the origins of curriculum development, including the philosophical, cognitive, and social foundations underlying educational curricula; 2) options for curriculum design; 3) needs, aims, goals and objectives; 4) the role of tests and instructional materials in the curriculum; 5) providing for effective teaching and teacher training; and, 6) the assessment and evaluation of both students and the curriculum itself.

Participants in the course will lead several small group discussions, write a number of short responses to issues raised in the course, develop a detailed curriculum plan for a specific educational institution or educational context, and take a final test.

This course can be used as elective credits for the M.S.Ed. and Ed.D./Ph.D. degrees.

Required Textbook:

  • Nation, I.S.P., & Macalister, J. (2009). Language Curriculum Design. New York, NY: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)
  • Brown, J. D. (1995). The Elements of Language Curriculum: A Systematic Approach to Program Development. Boston, MA: Heinle Cengage Learning. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2009). Concise Rules of APA Style (Concise Rules of the American Psychological Association (APA) Style) (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

Additional readings will be provided.

ENES 8654:

Classroom Applications of SLA Research

Professor:
Dr. Tomoko Nemoto
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
June 26 - August 9
Day & Time:
Monday and Wednesday, 18:00 - 21:00

This course has been cancelled.

The field of Second Language Acquisition (SLA) has experienced impressive growth in past 50 years, and as a result, there are many research findings that practitioners can learn and effectively apply foreign language classrooms. However, the difference between the research and pedagogical discourses sometimes cause practitioners difficulty in adapting and applying empirical findings to their classrooms. This course provides an overview of (a) SLA theories, (b) pedagogical methods and approaches, particularly task-based teaching, and (c) investigations into the factors that make up instructed SLA, including input, output, interaction, explicit instruction, and corrective feedback. Students will lead and participate in numerous group discussions, work on regular class assignments, and complete a course project. In addition, all students will be required to attend the open session of Distinguished Lecturer Series (Dr. Rod Ellis) from 14:00-17:00 on Saturday, July 8th and submit a summary of learning from the lecture.

This course can be used as elective credits for the M.S.Ed. and Ed.D./Ph.D. degrees.

Required Textbook:

  • Ellis, R., & Shintani, N. (2014). Exploring Language Pedagogy through Second Language Acquisition Research. Oxon, UK : Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2009). Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

A set of readings will be available on Blackboard.

TESOL Special Projects - Distinguished Lecturer Series

This Lecturer Series will consist of three weekend seminars. Each seminar course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ed.D/Ph.D. degrees. The first three hours of each seminar (Saturday, 14:00 to 17:00) are free and open to the public. Weekend seminars are free for Master's and doctoral graduates of Temple University Japan Campus for auditing; the fee for other weekend auditors is ¥13,000.

ENES 8655: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 1):

Invariant Measurement with Rasch Models for Rater-Mediated Assessments

Professor:
Dr. George Engelhard (The University of Georgia, U.S.A.)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, May 13, 14:00 - 21:00
 
Sunday, May 14, 10:00 - 17:00

Measurement issues play a critical role in discussions of second language acquisition. This seminar examines key psychometric issues related to invariant measurement based on Rasch models for rater-mediated assessments. The basic goal of invariant measurement is to develop useful scales to measure the latent variables that have high levels of stability and consistency. In other words, we seek to develop scales that will "stay put when our backs our turned". The assessment of competency in a second language frequently includes the use of rating scales to collect human judgments. This seminar focuses on guiding principles that can be used for the creation, evaluation and maintenance of invariant assessment systems based on human judgments.

Selected chapters from my new book with Professor Stefanie Wind will be shared with participants in the seminar. Participants in the seminar are encouraged to bring rater-mediated data sets for analyses with the Facets computer program (Rasch model).

Recommended Textbook:

  • Engelhard, G., Jr. (2013). Invariant Measurement: Using Rasch Models in the Social, Behavioral, and Health Sciences. New York, NY: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)
  • Engelhard, G., Jr., & Wind, S.A. (in press). Invariant Measurement with Raters and Rating Scales: Rasch Models for Rater-mediated Assessments. New York, NY: Routledge.

ENES 8656: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 2):

Cognitive and Corpus Linguistics-Inspired Approaches to Lexico-Grammar Instruction

Professor:
Dr. Dilin Liu (University of Alabama, U.S.A.)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, June 17, 14:00 - 21:00
 
Sunday, June 18, 10:00 - 17:00

Grammar and vocabulary are arguably two of the most important, albeit most difficult, aspects in second language learning. How to effectively teach these important aspects of language has long been a challenge. In the past few decades, contemporary linguistic approaches, such as systemic functional, cognitive, and corpus linguistics, have brought about new understandings about language, including the theory that language is a usage-based system motivated by our embodied conceptualization and the perspective that that grammar and vocabulary are two ends of one continuum rather than being two rigid separate entities. These understandings have inspired the development of more engaging and effective practices for lexico-grammar instruction. This seminar explores such cognitive and corpus linguistics-inspired approaches to lexico-grammar instruction.

Through lectures and discussions, we will first examine the main new theories and understandings about language and language acquisition espoused by the contemporary linguistics approaches and their implications for the teaching of lexico-grammar. Then, using concrete examples, we learn first-hand how such approaches can be used to help teach more engagingly and effectively various challenging aspects of lexico-grammar, including articles, parts of speech, prepositions, tense/aspect, synonyms, and word collocations. These examples will not only provide participants with ready-to-use activities but also help them reflect and innovate with new lexico-grammar teaching practices of their own.

Recommended Textbook:

  • Liu, D. (2014). Describing and Explaining Grammar and Vocabulary in ELT: Key Theories and Effective Practices. Oxon, UK: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)
  • Liu, D. & Lei, L. (2017). Using Corpora for Language Learning and Teaching. Alexandria, VA: TESOL Press. (Buy on Amazon.com)

ENES 8657: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 3):

Oral Corrective Feedback in Language Pedagogy and SLA

Professor:
Dr. Rod Ellis (Curtin University, Australia)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, July 8, 14:00 - 21:00
 
Sunday, July 9, 10:00 - 17:00

The purpose of this seminar is to explore the extent to which the approach to correcting learners oral errors evident in popular teacher guides is compatible with research that has investigated the effect of oral corrective feedback on second language acquisition. The approach adopted will be to first undertake a critical review of standard pedagogic positions regarding the provision of oral corrective feedback and then examine what second language acquisition researchers have discovered about the effect it has on acquisition. In this way, SLA theory and research serves as a basis for reflecting critically on established pedagogical practices.

Topics

  1. Introduction - what is 'oral corrective feedback'?
  2. Pedagogical positions relating to:
    • Whether to correct
    • What to correct
    • When to correct
    • How to correct
    • Who does the correction
  3. Theoretical perspectives on oral corrective feedback in SLA
  4. Types of oral corrective feedback
  5. Research investigating oral corrective feedback
  6. Evaluating the pedagogical positions

Methodology

The seminar will be taught by means of lectures followed up by questions and tasks which seminar participants will perform to apply the content covered in the lectures. Participants will be invited to formulate their own policy for carrying out oral corrective feedback in classrooms.

Doctoral Courses

EDUC 9998:

Dissertation Proposal Writing

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1 - 3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

This course is for those Ph.D. students who have passed the Qualifying Examination and working on their dissertation proposal.

The Ph.D. students are required to take Culminating Courses (6 semester hours overall, minimum 2 semester hours of ED 9999). Culminating Courses: Qualifying Exam Preparation Course (ED9994), Proposal Writing Course (ED9998) and Dissertation Writing Course (ED9999).

ENES 9882/ EPSY 9982:

Graduate Independent Study

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1 - 3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

This is a one-to-three credit course offered to doctoral candidates who are planning or writing dissertations. Consultations will be individual, and appointments will be arranged via e-mail in advance. The main aim of the course is to troubleshoot design, data collection, management, and analysis problems, as well as to encourage substantive progress on dissertation projects.

Students wishing to register for this course should obtain permission from the professor and complete the registration process during the priority or late registration period.

EDUC 9999:

Dissertation Writing

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1 - 3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

Six credit hours of Education 9999 are required for Ed.D./Ph.D. degrees.

Students wishing to register for this course should obtain permission from the professor and complete the registration process during the registration period.

EDUC 9282:

Research Apprenticeship

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

Required course for Ph.D. students. Ed.D. students who are thinking about graduating with a Ph.D. degree must take two 3-credit Research Apprenticeship courses.

If you wish to take an apprenticeship course, you first need to write a 300-400-word abstract of your proposed project (unless you are assisting a professor with one of his or her studies). This abstract should include basic information such as (a) the gaps in the literature you are addressing, (b) the purpose(s) of the study, (c) specific research questions, and (d) your methodology, including information about the participants, instruments, procedures, and the analyses you will perform. You will then need to send the abstract to the advisor you wish to work with (Consult the list of Apprenticeship advisors on the registration form to see who is available), and if the advisor approves your plan, you can then register for the course with that advisor.

EDUC 9994:

Qualifying Examination

Professor:
Dr. David Beglar
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
By Arrangement

Ph.D. students who will be taking Qualifying Examination are required to register for 1-credit EDUC9994, Qualifying Examination course, in Summer Session I, 2017.