Events

Upcoming Events

Time:
19:00 (Door open at 18:30)
Speakers:
  • Jane Taylor (New Zealand Attorney)
  • F. Frederic Fouad (Attorney, Adjunct Professor of Law, Temple University School of Law, Japan Campus)
  • Catherine L. Pugh (Attorney, Adjunct Professor of Law, Temple University School of Law, Japan Campus )

Is racial profiling an effective law enforcement tool, an unequivocal infringement on civil liberties, or something in between? Law enforcement has wide latitude in determining how to seek out, deter, and stop crime. One of the more controversial tools in the enforcement community is the use of race as a key factor for who to stop and question about the lawfulness of his or her conduct. Laws such as Arizona’s Anti-Immigrant Act or New York’s Stop and Frisk policy have at their core racial profiling for crime prevention. They are constantly under challenge by civil rights group for their disparate impact on communities of color. In today’s politically-charged climate, where…
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Time:
19:30 (Door open at 19:00)
Speaker:
  • Gilles Campagnolo (Full Research Professor at the French Center for Scientific Research / Aix-Marseilles School of Economics and Visiting Professor at Hokkaido University )

Gilles Campagnolo will look at the historical and contemporary dimensions of Chinese liberalism, exploring China’s economic development in a comparative context. In particular, in the volume he edited Liberalism and Chinese Economic Development (2016, London & NYC: Routledge) the differences from the Western model are explored, and more specifically, the relationship between Chinese economic thought and European traditions, assessing China’s economic development at both a macro and a micro level. Are free-trade and capitalistic economic developments sustainable without other types of liberal developments? Is the idea that political liberties and economic freedom go together merely a Western ideology? Campagnolo also considers China in relationship with its neighbors since Japan is…
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Time:
19:30 (Door open at 19:00)
Speaker:
  • Naohiro Yashiro (Dean of Global Business Department and Director of the Business Research Institute at the Showa Women’s University )

Professor Yashiro will discuss “Labor Market Reform in Abenomics.” PM Abe recently declared that equal pay for equal work should be the rule to narrow the wage gap between regular and non-regular workers. Preventing persistently long working hours has also been a major policy target for encouraging the labor force participation of women and the elderly. However, these reforms would impact the traditional employment practices of long-term job security and seniority-based wages. The increasing number of non-regular employees who are not granted job security are used as a shock absorber for protecting regular employees in recessions. Also, long working hours reflect an implicit division of labor within a family, which…
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Time:
19:30 (Door open at 19:00)
Speaker:
  • Nancy Snow (Adjunct Fellow of the Institute of Contemporary Asian Studies (ICAS) and Pax Mundi (World Peace) Professor of Public Diplomacy, Kyoto University of Foreign Studies)

As a follow-up to her May 9, 2016 talk at Temple University Japan Campus, politics and media expert Dr. Nancy Snow will discuss Trump’s persuasion and propaganda expectations. Snow is a former Department of State official and a Trump watcher for a quarter of a century. She will explain Trump’s American style and how it appeals and repels the American people. Is he destined for a mess as president or will he surprise, just as he did on Election Day 2016? If you missed her talk on May 9, 2016, you may want to watch a event video here.

Time:
19:00 (Door open at 18:30)
Speakers:
  • Lawrence Repeta (Professor of Law, Meiji University)
  • Junko Hayashi (Attorney, Partners Law Firm, Tokyo)
  • Sebastian Maslow (Assistant Professor, Graduate School of Law, Tohoku University, Japan)

As the world faces the persistent threat of terrorism, nation-states are grappling with how to combat terrorism and ensure the security of citizens and sovereign borders. The 9/11 attacks brought on the “War on Terrorism,” and with it a sharp rise in anti-Muslim sentiments. Governments are making sweeping changes to domestic and foreign policies, including instituting surveillance programs targeting Muslims, closing borders to refugees, extreme vetting of Muslim immigrants, and most recently, President Trump’s executive order barring travelers of Muslim-majority countries from entering the United States, which was overturned by a U.S. federal appeals court. The justification for these hard-line policies falls under the guise of national security. This panel…
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