In the Event of an Earthquake

On Campus

If a severe earthquake happens while you are on campus, please follow these procedures:

  1. Crouch under a desk or sit down where you are and cover your head and body with your belongings, bags or clothes so that you can avoid falling glass, whiteboards, light bulbs, etc.
  2. Move away from windows or shelves so as not to be injured by broken glass or falling objects.
  3. Remain where you are until the quake stops.
  4. After first ensuring your safety, if you are near the door of the room, open the door if possible.
  5. Remain inside the building.
  6. If evacuation is necessary, follow the TUJ floor safety officer‘s instructions and evacuate to the designated evacuation site.
  7. Phone or e-mail your parents or family to notify them of the situation. This is also necessary if the problem is less severe. From afar, family and friends may not know the specific situation in Tokyo and will need to be assured that you are okay even if there is no actual local threat.
  8. TUJ will contact all currently registered students through Temple e-mail to confirm your safety. Check your e-mail (TUmail) and follow the instructions given.

Off Campus

In the event of an earthquake, the following steps are recommended:

  1. Ensure your personal safety and get to the nearest safe place.
  2. Switch off all cooking and heating appliances, which may cause a fire. If a fire breaks out, extinguish it immediately with the nearest fire extinguisher.
  3. Open all doors including the front door to ensure an escape route.
  4. After an earthquake, there is the danger of after-shocks (yoshin) and tidal waves (tsunami). Try to listen regularly to the TV and radio to get up-to-date information.
  5. Do not rush out of a building. Wait until the earthquake has temporarily stopped, then get your emergency bag, put on a helmet or other protective covering and make your way to open space.
  6. If you are walking along a wide road, move out to the center. If downtown, be careful of falling objects such as signs, telephone poles, glass from windows, etc. Try not to become separated from neighbors.
  7. Inform your country’s embassy or consulate, your dorm manger, program director, or a university representative of your safety so that family members can be informed of your situation if they contact the university.
  8. Phone or e-mail your parents or family to notify them of the situation. This is also necessary if the problem is less severe. From afar, family and friends may not know the specific situation in Tokyo and will need to be assured that you are okay even if there is no actual local threat.