Course Descriptions (Tokyo)

To register for any of the courses below, follow the procedures described in Course Registration. If you already know the process, go to the Registration Form.

Important Notice about Textbooks

To purchase textbooks, click Amazon link below next to each textbook title. In order to get your textbooks in time for the start of the semester, please order them as soon as you register for courses. Make sure to order through the provided Amazon links in this page.

Fall Semester 2018

FLED 5470:

Introduction to the Study of TESOL

Professor:
Dr. Rick Romanko
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
September 10-December 3
Day & Time:
Monday, 18:00 - 21:00

In lieu of the first class on Monday, September 3, the students will be required to attend any one of the three Fall 2018 Distinguished Lecturer Series Seminars (only the first three hours of the Saturday session 14:00-17:00).

As the first class meeting for this course is on Monday, September 10, after the add/drop period ends, the Office will accept drops only for this course until 21:30 on Monday, September 10 (after the first class meeting ends).

Beginning students of TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) usually have two purposes: (1) to learn the academic skills they need to succeed at graduate work and (2) to discover the best ways to teach English to non-native speakers. In this course, students will achieve the first purpose, mastering necessary academic skills, while getting a head start on the second, understanding methods and issues of TESOL study. Academic skills include getting the most out of lectures and research articles, taking notes, accessing library and Internet resources, answering essay test questions, giving presentations, and writing papers using proper forms of citation, paraphrasing, and bibliographic references.

This course is designed for students who are new to the Master of Science in Education program, who have little or no experience studying in an English-language university, or who are not familiar with formal academic writing style (APA style). For such students, this course is recommended as the first course in the M.S.Ed. curriculum. Registrants who are not native speakers of English should have a TOEFL score of at least 550 on the paper-based test or 80 on the Internet-based test.

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Lightbown, P. M., & Spada, N. (2013). How languages are learned (Oxford handbooks for language teachers) (4th ed.). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. ( Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com )

Recommended Textbook:

TESL 5612:

Applied Language Study II: Grammar, Morphology and Classroom Discourse

Professor:
Dr. Tomoko Nemoto
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
September 5-December 5
Day & Time:
Wednesday, 18:00 - 21:00

The last seventy years have seen a double revolution in linguistic theory: first the triumph of structural linguistics over traditional grammar, then the ascendancy of generative-transformational analysis over structural linguistics. Today, textbooks and teaching materials based on structural linguistic theories and G-T theories are regularly published, even as traditional grammar continues to exert a strong influence on EFL methods and materials.

This course will explore in some detail the theories and practices of traditional grammar, structural linguistics, and generative-transformational analysis. From that technical base, we will study the ways in which each theory influences textbook authors and teaching materials and how EFL and ESL teachers can decide which grammatical theory best explains the way the English language works and which approach offers the best techniques for classroom instruction. We will also consider current notions of case grammar, functional grammar, cognitive linguistics, connectionism, Universal Grammar, and Chomsky’s government and binding and minimalist theories.

Course participants should expect to do regular reading assignments, weekly homework in grammatical analysis, take a final examination, and complete a course project, which involves conducting a small-scale study in which a particular grammar point is taught to one or more students over a period of several weeks.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree. This course is formerly known as TESL 5612: Applied Language Study II.

Required Textbook:

  • Larsen-Freeman, D., & Celce-Murcia, M. (2015). Grammar book: Form, meaning, and use for English language teachers (3rd ed.). Boston, MA: Heinle Cengage Learning. ( Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com )

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2010). Publication manual of the American psychological association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. ( Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com )

TESL 5613:

Multilingual Students' Literacy Development

Professor:
Dr. Robert Nelson
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
September 4-December 4
Day & Time:
Tuesday, 18:00 - 21:00

This course offers an overview of the underlying concepts and skills that are needed for teaching that is focused on ESL and EFL literacy development at all age and proficiency levels. Students will acquire a working knowledge of the current best practices for the teaching of reading and writing in English as a Foreign/Second/Other Language to adults and children. They will also become familiar with the theory behind the various current methods for planning, implementing, and assessing reading and writing instruction for all levels of ESL/EFL students, from pre-literacy to academic skills. Students will also acquire a familiarity with criteria and methods in these fields sufficient to enable them to develop and evaluate teaching methods suited to the local needs of their students, yet clearly motivated by the best research insights. Specific topics will include reading comprehension, vocabulary development, the psycholinguistics of reading, the nature of literacy, the writing process, the effectiveness of written feedback, the social and institutional contexts of ESL/EFL reading and writing, and reading and writing assessment.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. students who complete the matriculation process after fall 2018 semester. Students who completed the matriculation process by fall 2018 can take this course for the elective credits.

Required Textbook:

  • Chen, X., Dronjic, V., & Helms-Park, R (2016). Reading in a second language: Cognitive and psycholinguistic issues. Oxon, UK: Routledge. ( Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com )
  • Ferris, D. R., & Hedgcock, J. (2014). Teaching L2 composition: Purpose, process, and practice (3rd ed.). New York, NY: Routledge. ( Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com )
  • Lems, K., Miller, L. D., & Soro, T. M. (2017). Building literacy with English language learners: Insights from linguistics (2nd ed.).New York, NY: The Guilford Press. ( Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com )

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association (2010). Concise rules of APA style (Concise rules of the American psychological association (APA) style) (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. ( Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com )

TESL 5614:

Current Approaches to Teaching English Language Learners

Professor:
Dr. Tim Doe
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
September 6-December 6
Day & Time:
Thursday, 18:00 - 21:00

Students will be required to attend the Distinguished Lecturer Series seminar, (Dr. David Crabbe: Understanding Language Course Design as a Problem-Solving Process) on Saturday, October 20 from 14:00-17:00, in lieu of the October 25 class.

The purpose of this course is to enable participants to develop an awareness of second language theory and classroom practice. Issues to be investigated include: an account of the central processes of learning and the conditions believed to promote language acquisition; the elements of a language learning curriculum and their relation to the processes by which learners acquire language; past methods and current approaches to language teaching; and various types of materials and activities believed to foster acquisition. Participants will be encouraged to consider how these issues relate to their own classroom contexts and develop a personal set of teaching principles. Sessions will cover topics such as the roles of input, output, form-focused instruction, fluency development activities, motivation, and task-based language teaching.

In addition to required reading, participants will take a mid-term and final exam, make written responses to important issues discussed in the course, lead several small group discussions based around academic readings, write a course paper focused on a topic related to the course, and make an oral presentation demonstrating how theories of language learning can inform teaching pedagogy.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree. This course is formerly known as TESL 5614: TESOL Approaches to Teaching English.

Required Textbook:

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association (2010). Concise rules of APA style (Concise rules of the American psychological association (APA) style) (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. ( Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com )

Additional readings will be provided by the instructor.

TESL 5618:

Second Language Development

Professor:
Dr. David Beglar
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
September 7-December 7
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00 - 21:00

The overarching purpose of this course is to canvass ten contemporary theories that are central to modern discussions of second language development (SLD) and to thereby provide the participants with an opportunity to further develop and consolidate their understanding of SLD, models of language representation and use, and issues that directly affect classroom teaching. In the first part of the course, we look at (a) early theories of second language development, (b) orders and sequences of acquisition, and (c) language transfer. In the second part of the course, the focus is on a number of theoretical positions, including (a) Usage-based approaches, (b) Skill-acquisition theory, and (c) Input processing. Finally, in the third part of the course, we read about (a) input, interaction, and output; (b) Sociocultural theory, and (c) instructed second language development, which concerns the practical application of a number of strands in the field of second language development. Students will participate in and lead numerous small group discussions, produce a synthesis of the course readings, take in-class examinations, and make a presentation on a self-selected SLD topic. Course participants should read Chapters 1-7 in Theories in Second Language Acquisition: An Introduction before the first class meeting.

The course is best taken by students who have already completed TESL 5611, TESL 5612, TESL 5614, TESL 5616.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree. This course is formerly known as TESL 5618: Second Language Acquisition.

Required Textbook:

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association (2010). Concise rules of APA style (Concise rules of the American psychological association (APA) style) (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. ( Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com )

EDUC 5212:

Curriculum Development for Language Teachers

Professor:
Dr. Robert Nelson
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
September 6-December 6
Day & Time:
Thursday 18:00 - 21:00

The primary aim of this course is to provide a broad overview of contemporary issues in the design of educational curricula. It is hoped that accomplishing this aim will lead participants to develop a clearer understanding of the complexities of designing and implementing foreign language curricula and greater confidence and skill in undertaking such a task.

The main topics to be covered include:

  1. the origins of curriculum development, including the philosophical, cognitive, and social foundations underlying educational curricula;
  2. options for curriculum design;
  3. needs, aims, goals and objectives;
  4. the role of tests and instructional materials in the curriculum;
  5. providing for effective teaching and teacher training; and,
  6. the assessment and evaluation of both students and the curriculum itself.

Participants in the course will lead several small group discussions, write a number of short responses to issues raised in the course, develop a detailed curriculum plan for a specific educational institution or educational context, and take a final test.

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.E d. and Ph.D. degrees.

Required Textbook:

Additional readings will be provided.

ENES 8744:

Classroom Applications of SLA Research

Professor:
Dr. Tomoko Nemoto
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
September 7-November 30
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00 - 21:00

This course has been canceled

The field of Second Language Acquisition (SLA) has experienced impressive growth in past 50 years, and as a result, there are many research findings that practitioners can learn and effectively apply foreign language classrooms. However, the difference between the research and pedagogical discourses sometimes cause practitioners difficulty in adapting and applying empirical findings to their classrooms. This course provides an overview of (a) SLA theories, (b) pedagogical methods and approaches, particularly task-based teaching, and (c) investigations into the factors that make up instructed SLA, including input, output, interaction, explicit instruction, and corrective feedback. Students will lead and participate in numerous group discussions, work on regular class assignments, and complete a course project. In addition, all students will be required to attend the public session of Distinguished Lecturer Series Seminar (Dr. David Wood) from 14:00-17:00 on Saturday, November 10 and submit a summary of learning from the lecture in lieu of the last class on December 7.

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D.degrees.

Required Textbook:

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2010). Publication manual of the American psychological association. (6th ed.).Washington, DC: Author. ( Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com )

TESOL Special Projects - Distinguished Lecturer Series

This Lecturer Series will consist of three weekend seminars. Each seminar course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees. The first three hours of each seminar (Saturday, 14:00 to 17:00) are free and open to the public. Weekend seminars are free for Master's and doctoral graduates of Temple University Japan Campus for auditing; the fee for other weekend auditors is ¥13,000.

ENES 8655: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 1):

Age-related Factors in Second Language Learning

Professor:
Dr. David Singleton (University of Pannonia, Hungary)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, September 22, 14:00 - 21:00
 
Sunday, September 23, 10:00 - 17:00

For most people the answer to the question of when it is best to begin learning a second language is self-evident. The cliché “the younger the better” would sum up the opinion delivered by the majority of respondents to such a question! We shall see in this course, however, that the facts of the matter are not so simple.

The maturational perspective or Critical Period Hypothesis has had its original theoretical postulates swept away by more recent research. While it is true that in naturalistic contexts younger second language beginners tend in the long run to do better than older beginners, there are plenty of examples of people who start their second language experience in adolescence or adulthood and who end up native-like in the second language in question. It turns out that the key to success at any age relates to the quality of interaction and the affective dimensions of interaction with the second language and its users.

With regard to the instructional context, the clear and consistent finding of more than forty years of research is that early schooling in a second language confers no lasting linguistic advantage over those whose second language exposure at school begins later. Recent findings suggest that in instructional settings too, quality of interaction, attitude and motivation are more important than starting age. These findings have unfortunately been ignored by governments and ministries of education around the world.

The course will explore all of these issues, and it will maintain a focus throughout on the educational implications of the research findings discussed. In particular, it will deliver the message that:

  • whatever the age of the learners, it is very important to provide a lively and engaging experience of input and interaction in the target language, because;
  • it is vital to maintain interest and motivation in regard to coming to grips with the target language, and;
  • this seems to be more of a challenge with learners who begin L2 learning young and whose language-learning experience lasts longer.

ENES 8656: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 2):

Understanding Language Course Design as a Problem-solving Process

Professor:
Dr. David Crabbe (Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, October 20, 14:00 - 21:00
 
Sunday, October 21, 10:00 - 17:00

Course design at its most basic is specifying learning goals, together with effective learning opportunities to achieve those goals. But it is more exciting than that. Course design in practice and in context is not static. It requires systematic and on-going problem-solving that starts with understanding the people concerned and the resources available. The understanding entails elements such as the potential roles of learners and teachers, their motivation and beliefs, the opportunities available in and out of the classroom for communicative performance, ways of enhancing that performance, ways of describing it for better metacognitive understanding, and any obstacles in taking up the opportunities.

This course will provide a framework for course design as informed problem-solving, drawing on what are seen as universals of human language learning and focussing on how those universals might be activated in context. The framework will raise questions about, for example: the role of the learners in the problem-solving; how their autonomy and motivation as members of a learning community might be fostered; how the impact of examinations could be managed productively; and how a bridge might be built between the classroom and the private domain of learning. Attention will be paid throughout to continually evaluating the impact of actions taken.

ENES 8657: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 3):

Formulaic Language in Applied Linguistics and TESOL

Professor:
Dr. David Wood (Carleton University, Canada)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, November 10, 14:00 - 21:00
 
Sunday, November 11, 10:00 - 17:00

A considerable amount of research of various types has been conducted around formulaic language (FL)—multiword units with unitary meanings or functions that appear to be prefabricated, mentally stored, and processed as if single words. As the nature of FL and its use and acquisition have been studied for many years, it is remarkable that there have been so few investigations into how to actually teach this essential element of language to second language (L2) learners. We know that only very advanced learners reach a near-native ability to process and produce FL rapidly and appropriately (e.g., Forsberg 2010; Laufer & Waldman, 2011). L2 learners are very challenged by FL and develop facility with it very slowly. This course is an introduction to the phenomenon of FL and its relevance to applied linguistics, specifically language production, language acquisition and teaching, and discourse. We will survey the state of knowledge about FL in L2 acquisition and production, and its role in constructing discourse, with reference to some actual language data. We will explore the ways that FL can be integrated into language teaching methods and materials. By the end of the course participants should have a strong understanding of FL and its importance, and a sense of how to employ this understanding in the language classroom.

Required Textbook:

Doctoral Courses

For Ph.D 2012 and 2015 students only

EDUC 9998:

Dissertation Proposal Writing

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1 - 3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

This course is for those Ph.D. students who have passed the Qualifying Examination and working on their dissertation proposal.

The Ph.D. students are required to take Culminating Courses (6 semester hours overall, minimum 2 semester hours of ED 9999). Culminating Courses: Qualifying Exam Preparation Course (ED 9994), Proposal Writing Course (ED 9998) and Dissertation Writing Course (ED 9999).

EDUC 9999:

Dissertation Writing

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1 - 3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

This is a one to three credits offered to Ph.D. candidates who completed dissertation proposal defense and received an approval on their dissertation proposal. The Ph.D. students are required to take Culminating Courses (6 semester hours overall, minimum 2 semester hours of ED 9999). Culminating Courses: Qualifying Exam Preparation Course (ED9994), Proposal Writing Course (ED 9998) and Dissertation Writing Course (ED 9999).

Students wishing to register for this course should obtain permission from the professor and complete the registration process during the registration period.

EDUC 9282:

Research Apprenticeship

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

If you wish to take an Apprenticeship course, you first need to write a 300-400-word abstract of your proposed project (unless you are assisting a professor with one of his or her studies). This abstract should include basic information such as (a) the gaps in the literature you are addressing, (b) the purpose(s) of the study, (c) specific research questions, and (d) your methodology, including information about the participants, instruments, procedures, and the analyses you will perform. You will then need to send the abstract to the advisor you wish to work with (Consult the list of Apprenticeship advisors on the registration form to see who is available), and if the advisor approves your plan, you can then register for the course with that advisor.

For Ph.D. 2017 students only

Students in the Ph.D. program are required to take the doctoral seminar listed below.

TESL 8636:

Assessment of English Language Learners

Professor:
Dr. Jim Sick
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
September 14-December 8
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00 - 21:00
Saturday, 14:00 - 17:00

For more details about the schedule, please check the schedule chart below.

The goals of this course are twofold. First, to develop a level of expertise in language assessment in the institutional context such that one may serve as a leader, trainer, and resource in the implementation of high quality assessments for admissions, placement, diagnostics, achievement, and measuring progress over time. Second, to develop practical skills in the construction and validation of language performance and affective measures so that their use may be defended for research and/or high stakes testing. The first aim will involve extensive reading in the area of language assessment, supplemented by class lectures and student-led discussions. The second goal will be approached from the perspective of Rasch measurement theory, and will involve extensive use of the Winsteps and FACETS software packages. In addition to focused item writing assignments, students will analyze and interpret test and survey data using data sets supplied by the teacher. As a final course project, participants will conceptualize, design, and pilot an instrument designed to measure a particular language skill such as listening, speaking, or grammar, or an affective variable such as motivation known to impact language performance. Participants should plan a means of data collection, so that they will be able to pilot their instrument and conduct a Rasch analysis before the end of the course (30 or more participants for a survey, or 12+ for a productive performance). As preparation for the first weekend session, participants are requested to read Units A1-A3 in Fulcher and Davidson, Chapters 1-3 in Bond and Fox, and Chapters 1-3 of Green before the first class session. Participants who have not taken a masters level course in language testing are recommended to read Green prior to the course.

This course is required for the Ph. D. degree.

Required Textbook:

Dr. Sick's Class Schedule

Session Day Date Class Time Note
1 Friday September 14, 2018 18:00 - 21:00  
2 Saturday September 15, 2018 14:00 - 17:00  
3 Friday September 28, 2018 18:00 - 21:00  
4 Saturday September 29, 2018 14:00 - 17:00  
5 Friday October 12, 2018 18:00 - 21:00  
6 Saturday October 13, 2018 14:00 - 17:00  
7 Friday October 26, 2018 18:00 - 21:00  
8 Saturday October 27, 2018 14:00 - 17:00  
9 Friday November 9, 2018 18:00 - 21:00  
10 Saturday November 10, 2018 14:00 - 17:00  
11 Friday November 23, 2018 18:00 - 21:00  
12 Saturday November 24, 2018 14:00 - 17:00 *Class cancellation due to the JALT Annual Conference. Make-up session is scheduled to be held on Sat, 12/8 (10-13).
12 Friday December 7, 2018 18:00 - 21:00  
13 Saturday December 8, 2018 10:00 - 13:00  
14 Saturday December 8, 2018 14:00 - 17:00