Course Descriptions (Tokyo)

To register for any of the courses below, follow the procedures described in Course Registration. If you already know the process, go to the Registration Form.

Important Notice about Textbooks

To purchase textbooks, click Amazon link below next to each textbook title. In order to get your textbooks in time for the start of the semester, please order them as soon as you register for courses. Make sure to order through the provided Amazon links in this page.

Summer Semester 2019 Session I

FLED 5470:

Introduction to the Study of TESOL

Professor:
Dr. Ron Martin
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 9 - August 8
Day & Time:
Thursday, 18:00-21:00

In the lieu of Thursday, May 30, all the students will be required to attend any one of the three Distinguished Lecturer Weekend Seminars scheduled in summer.

Beginning students of TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) usually have two purposes: (1) to learn the academic skills they need to succeed at graduate work and (2) to discover the best ways to teach English to non-native speakers. In this course, students will achieve the first purpose, mastering necessary academic skills, while getting a head start on the second, understanding methods and issues of TESOL study. Academic skills include getting the most out of lectures and research articles, taking notes, accessing library and internet resources, answering essay test questions, giving presentations, and writing papers using proper forms of citation, paraphrasing and bibliographic references.

This course is designed for students who are new to the Master of Science in Education program, who have little or no experience studying in an English-language university, or who are not familiar with formal academic writing style (APA style). For such students, this course is recommended as the first course in the M.S.Ed. curriculum. Registrants who are not native speakers of English should have a TOEFL score of at least 550 on the paper-based test or 80 on the internet-based test.

There will be 13 regular class sessions for this course and in addition to the regular class sessions, all the students will be required to attend any one of the three Distinguished Lecturer Weekend Seminars (only the first three hours of the Saturday session) scheduled in summer. The professor will provide you with further details about the seminar requirement later in the classroom.

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Lightbown, P. M., & Spada, N. (2013). How languages are learned (Oxford handbooks for language teachers) (4th ed.). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2010). Publication manual of the American psychological association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)
  • Richards, J. C., & Schmidt, R. (2010). Longman dictionary of language teaching and applied linguistics. (4th ed.). Oxon, UK: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

TESL 5612:

Applied Language Study II: Grammar, Morphology and Classroom Discourse

Professor:
Dr. Tomoko Nemoto
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 7 - June 20
Day & Time:
Tuesday, 18:00-21:00
Thursday, 18:00-21:00

The last seventy years have seen a double revolution in linguistic theory: first the triumph of structural linguistics over traditional grammar, then the ascendancy of generative-transformational analysis over structural linguistics. Today, textbooks and teaching materials based on structural linguistic theories and G-T theories are regularly published, even as traditional grammar continues to exert a strong influence on EFL methods and materials.

This course will explore in some detail the theories and practices of traditional grammar, structural linguistics, and generative-transformational analysis. From that technical base, we will study the ways in which each theory influences textbook authors and teaching materials and how EFL and ESL teachers can decide which grammatical theory best explains the way the English language works and which approach offers the best techniques for classroom instruction. We will also consider current notions of case grammar, functional grammar, cognitive linguistics, connectionism, Universal Grammar, and Chomsky’s government and binding and minimalist theories.

Course participants should expect to do regular reading assignments, weekly homework in grammatical analysis, take a final examination, and complete a course project, which involves conducting a small-scale study in which a particular grammar point is taught to one or more students over a period of several weeks.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Larsen-Freeman, D., & Celce-Murcia, M. (2015). Grammar book: Form, meaning, and use for English language teachers (3rd ed.). Boston, MA: Heinle Cengage Learning. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association (2010). Publication manual of the American psychological association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

TESL 5613:

Multilingual Students' Literacy Development

Professor:
Dr. Robert Nelson
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 8 - June 24
Day & Time:
Monday, 18:00-21:00
Wednesday, 18:00-21:00

This course offers an overview of the underlying concepts and skills that are needed for teaching that is focused on ESL and EFL literacy development at all age and proficiency levels. Students will acquire a working knowledge of the current best practices for the teaching of reading and writing in English as a Foreign/Second/Other Language to adults and children. They will also become familiar with the theory behind the various current methods for planning, implementing, and assessing reading and writing instruction for all levels of ESL/EFL students, from pre-literacy to academic skills. Students will also acquire a familiarity with criteria and methods in these fields sufficient to enable them to develop and evaluate teaching methods suited to the local needs of their students, yet clearly motivated by the best research insights. Specific topics will include reading comprehension, vocabulary development, the psycholinguistics of reading, the nature of literacy, the writing process, the effectiveness of written feedback, the social and institutional contexts of ESL/EFL reading and writing, and reading and writing assessment.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. students who complete the matriculation process after fall 2018 semester. Students who completed the matriculation process by fall 2018 can take this course for the elective credits.

Required Textbook:

  • Chen, X., Dronjic, V., & Helms-Park, R. (2016). Reading in a second language: Cognitive and psycholinguistic issues. Oxon, UK: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)
  • Dana R. Ferris, John Hedgcock. (2014). Teaching L2 composition: Purpose, process, and practice (3rd ed.). New York, NY: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)
  • Kristen Lems, Leah D. Miller, Tenena M. Soro. (2017). Building literacy with English language learners, second edition: Insights from linguistics (2nd ed.). New York, NY: The Guilford Press (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)
  • American Psychological Association. (2010). Concise rules of APA style (Concise rules of the American psychological association (APA) style). (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

TESL 5614:

Current Approaches to Teaching English Language Learners

Professor:
Dr. David Beglar
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 10 - June 22
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00-21:00
Saturday, 14:00-17:00

This course aims to enable participants to develop an awareness of two areas in the field of second language acquisition, (a) the elements of curriculum design and (b) second language acquisition theory and its application to classroom practice. Issues to be investigated in the first part of the course include the elements of a language learning curriculum including needs analysis, goals and objectives, assessment, pedagogical materials, teaching, and program evaluation. In the second part of the course, we will look at issues such as the roles of input, output, explicit instruction, task-based language teaching, and corrective feedback and ways in which they can implemented in a foreign language curriculum. The overarching goal of the course is for participants to have clear ideas about how to create and organize foreign language curricula and what instructional elements to include in classroom instruction.

In addition to extensive reading, participants will be required to lead and participate in small group discussions, complete a course project, and perform successfully on a comprehensive test. Course participants should read The Elements of Language Curriculum, Chapters 1-4 in Teaching by Principles, and Chapters 1-4 in Exploring Pedagogy Through Second Language Acquisition Research before the first class meeting.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Brown, H. D., & Lee, H. (2015). Teaching by principles: An interactive approach to language pedagogy (4th ed.). White Plains, NY: Pearson Education. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)
  • Brown, J. D. (1995). The elements of language curriculum: A systematic approach to program development. Boston, MA: Heinle Cengage Learning. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)
  • Ellis, R. and Shintani, N. (2014). Exploring pedagogy through second language acquisition research. Oxon, UK: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)
  • American Psychological Association. (2010). Concise rules of APA style (Concise rules of the American psychological association (APA) style). (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

EPSY 8625:

Introduction to Research Methodology

Professor:
Dr. James Sick
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 8 - June 24
Day & Time:
Monday, 18:00-21:00
Wednesday, 18:00-21:00

This course has been cancelled

This course will present a broad overview of research methods and protocols currently used in applied linguistics and educational psychology. The primary goals are to assist teachers in becoming better informed consumers of research and to establish a foundation for actively conducting research in the future.

By the end of the course, students will attain a general understanding of the quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods research protocols currently employed in applied linguistics. In addition to the textbook, students will critically read example research articles in order to gain familiarity with the presentation of research results and to evaluate the validity and appropriateness of the methods employed. Topics to be covered include the purposes, strengths, and limitations of different research designs, ethical standards when conducting research with human subjects, data collection methods, coding and interpretation of qualitative data, reliability and validity of quantitative data, assumptions underlying statistical analyses, and basic principles of sampling and probability. Assessment will be based on weekly online quizzes and two short written projects.

Quantitative analysis techniques such as descriptive statistics, correlation, t-tests, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and factor analysis will be introduced and practiced using the free JASP software package and supplied data sets. Students should have a laptop computer, either Mac or Windows, to bring to class on days when we do data analysis.

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D degrees.

Required Textbook:

  • Paltridge, B., & Phakiti, A. (2015). Research methods in applied linguistics: A practical resource (Research methods in linguistics) (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Bloomsbury USA Academic (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)
  • Brown, J. D. (2016). Statistics corner: Questions and answers about language testing statistics. North Charleston, SC: Create Space Independent Publishing Platform (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

Summer Semester 2019 Session II

FLED 5470:

Introduction to the Study of TESOL

Professor:
Dr. Ron Martin
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 9 - August 8
Day & Time:
Thursday, 18:00-21:00

Continued from Summer Session I.

TESL 5611:

Applied Language Study I: Phonology and the Lexicon

Professor:
Dr. Tomoko Nemoto
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
June 25 - August 8
Day & Time:
Tuesday, 18:00-21:00
Thursday, 18:00-21:00

This course has been cancelled

The primary purpose of this course is to introduce students to the basics of English phonetics and phonology, with an emphasis on areas of interest to language teachers. The course objectives are to: (1) introduce the basic concepts of phonetics and phonology; (2) provide practice in transcribing and analyzing the sound systems of native speakers and learners of English; (3) consider the place of pronunciation teaching in a foreign language curriculum and instructional approaches; (4) examine methods of assessing pronunciation; and (5) look at the relationship between pronunciation and other language skills. Students will complete a number of weekly assignments, take a mid-term examination and final examination, and conduct a project in which the speech of an English language learner is analyzed, a particular aspect of the English sound system is taught, and the results reported.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Celce-Murcia, M., Brinton, D.M., & Goodwin, J.M. (2010). Teaching pronunciation: A course book and reference guide (2nd ed.). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

Recommended Textbook:

  • Avery. P., & Ehrlich. S. (1992). Teaching American English pronunciation (Oxford handbooks for language teachers series). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)
  • American Psychological Association. (2010) Publication manual of the American psychological association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

TESL 5616:

Designing Assessment and Curriculum for Multicultural Students

Professor:
Dr. Robert Nelson
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
June 26 - August 7
Day & Time:
Monday, 18:00-21:00
Wednesday, 18:00-21:00

*Due to the relocation of TUJ Tokyo Campus in August, class schedule for this course will be changed.

For further details, please check the schedule chart below.

The first major purpose of this course is to give students the skills they need to develop and design language courses in all skill areas, with a special focus on materials design and assessment practices. The second purpose is to familiarize students with the states of the art in meaning-driven teaching methods (i.e., Task-, Project-, Theme-, and Content-based teaching) while respecting the importance of traditional grammar and vocabulary teaching to EFL audiences. These general principles form a framework within which students are introduced to the principles of cognitive linguistics that are relevant to teaching (e.g., construction and cognitive grammar, construal, and embodied meaning and metaphor). Students will learn to integrate their own situated observations with research findings to generate topically relevant material for any age group that meets the criteria laid out by any curriculum they follow. This material (lesson and task plans, texts, recordings, etc.) will support the teaching of the four skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) as well as the linguistic competencies of English. That is, students will leave the class able to employ the principles of meaning based linguistics and pedagogy to create motivating learning experiences that are flexible enough to fluidly switch between form and function foci. Course requirements include completing weekly readings, contributing to group discussions, completing a final examination and course projects, and compiling a teaching portfolio.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

Dr. Nelson's Class Schedule

Session Day Date Class Time Note
1 Wednesday June 26, 2019 18:00-21:00  
2 Monday July 1, 2019 18:00-21:00  
3 Wednesday July 3, 2019 18:00-21:00  
4 Monday July 8, 2019 18:00-21:00  
5 Wednesday July 10, 2019 18:00-21:00  
6 Monday July 15, 2019 18:00-21:00  
7 Wednesday July 17, 2019 18:00-21:00  
8 Monday July 22, 2019 18:00-21:00  
9 Wednesday July 24, 2019 18:00-21:00  
10 Monday July 29, 2019 18:00-21:00  
11 Wednesday July 31, 2019 18:00-21:00  
12 Saturday August 3, 2019 14:00-17:00 *Date and Time Changed
13 Monday August 5, 2019 18:00-21:00  
14 Wednesday August 7, 2019 18:00-21:00  
14 Monday August 12, 2019 18:00-21:00  

EDUC 5254:

Technology in Education in the 21st Century

Professor:
Dr. James Elwood
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
June 25 - August 8
Day & Time:
Tuesday, 18:00-21:00
Thursday, 18:00-21:00

This course will provide a wide-reaching background in the use of technology in language education. Students will be exposed to a potpourri of topics, including (but not limited to) theoretical underpinnings of technology usage, applications both known and obscure, linguistic aspects of technology usage, and research and pedagogical trends in the tech-ed world. Time will also be devoted to roles that technology can play as an aid to and object of research. This course will also feature a substantial dose of practical instruction in such areas as manipulating common software, utilizing keyboard shortcuts, expanding into the cloud, and facilitating classroom instruction. During class, students will lead group discussions, introduce an element from the cybersphere in an oral presentation, and take occasional in-class quizzes. Outside of class, students will compile a virtual reaction journal and write a course paper in which they delve into a self-selected aspect of technology relevant to education.

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D degrees.

Required Textbook: There is no textbook requirement for this course.

ENES 8654:

Teaching and Learning Vocabulary

Professor:
Dr. David Beglar
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
June 28 - August 3
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00-21:00
Saturday, 14:00-17:00

*Due to the relocation of TUJ Tokyo Campus in August, class schedule for this course will be changed.

For further details, please check the schedule chart below.

The course is focused on teaching, learning, and researching vocabulary — single words and multi-word units — in a second language. In this course, we will look at a wide range of topics, such as what is involved in knowing a word; how much vocabulary is needed when using the four major skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing; acquiring and using specialized vocabulary; learning words from context; using dictionaries effectively, and learning multi-word units. The course has two primary aims. The first aim is for participants to become more familiar with the wide variety of research that makes up the field of second language vocabulary acquisition. The second aim, which rests on the foundation provided by the first aim, is to develop the knowledge and skills necessary to create an effective plan for teaching vocabulary in a course or in a foreign-language curriculum.

Course participants will read extensively, complete in-class tasks regarding vocabulary teaching and learning, participate in and lead small group discussions, conduct a course project by analyzing the lexical composition of a language teaching textbook, test (e.g., entrance examination), or written materials designed for native English speakers. Participants will make an in-class presentation about their course project. By the end of the course, course participants should be aware of the major issues pertinent to teaching, learning, and researching second-language vocabulary, be able to design a vocabulary component for a language course, and advise teachers and learners on vocabulary learning strategies. Course participants should read the first six chapters in Learning Vocabulary in Another Language before the first class meeting.

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D degrees.

Required Textbook:

Dr. Beglar's Class Schedule

Session Day Date Class Time Note
1 Friday June 28, 2019 18:00-21:00  
2 Saturday June 29, 2019 14:00-17:00  
3 Friday July 5, 2019 18:00-21:00  
4 Saturday July 6, 2019 14:00-17:00  
5 Saturday July 6, 2019 18:00-21:00 *Date and Time Changed
6 Friday July 12, 2019 18:00-21:00  
7 Saturday July 13, 2019 14:00-17:00  
8 Friday July 19, 2019 18:00-21:00  
9 Saturday July 20, 2019 14:00-17:00  
10 Saturday July 20, 2019 18:00-21:00 *Date and Time Changed
11 Friday July 26, 2019 18:00-21:00  
12 Saturday July 27, 2019 14:00-17:00  
13 Friday August 2, 2019 18:00-21:00  
14 Saturday August 3, 2019 14:00-17:00  
13 Friday August 9, 2019 18:00-21:00  
14 Saturday August 10, 2019 14:00-17:00  

TESOL Special Projects - Distinguished Lecturer Series

This Lecturer Series will consist of three weekend seminars. Each seminar course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees. The first three hours of each seminar (Saturday, 14:00 to 17:00) are free and open to the public. Weekend seminars are free for Master's and doctoral graduates of Temple University Japan Campus for auditing; the fee for other weekend auditors is ¥13,000.

ENES 8655: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 1):

Second Language Pragmatics: Theory, Research, and Pedagogy

Professor:
Dr. Naoko Taguchi, (Carnegie Mellon University, U.S.A.)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, May 11, 14:00-21:00
 
Sunday, May 12, 10:00-17:00

Pragmatics, an area within linguistics, is concerned with how people use language in a social context and why they use it in particular ways. The aim of this course is to develop awareness of pragmatics phenomena in our everyday communication, as well as to understand opportunities and challenges that second language (L2) learners face when learning pragmatics in L2. The course is divided into three units. The first unit, theory, surveys theories of pragmatics and pragmatic competence drawing on two distinct yet complementary fields, linguistics and second language acquisition (SLA). The second unit, research, examines the application of pragmatics theories to SLA research through critical discussions of recent empirical findings. The third unit, pedagogy, introduces issues related to teaching and assessment of pragmatic competence. We will examine pragmatics-related materials in a textbook and curriculum, major findings from instructional studies, and common assessment methods and their implications. Through critical examinations of the literature in these three areas, the course will help develop an understanding of the role of pragmatics in L2 research and teaching.

A collection of articles and book chapters will be provided as required readings.

Recommended Textbook:

ENES 8656: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 2):

Issues of (mis)communication in Science and Mathematics Classrooms--the Surprising Importance of Language

Professor:
Dr. Timothy Fukawa-Connelly (Temple University, U.S.A.)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, June 22, 14:00-21:00
 
Sunday, June 23, 10:00-17:00

This course will synthesize the results of various classroom-based (content-based) studies of language and communicative practices in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) classrooms. At least in the US, science and mathematics classes are often sites where ELL students are mainstreamed early due to some educators’ belief that there are relatively few language demand in such courses. We will justify the claim that there is a mathematics and science register, exploring features of the register(s), including issues of polysemy in which the common communicative meaning might interfere with communication. During the seminar we will discuss a range of descriptive, quasi-experimental, and quantitative studies, which explore ways in which the language use and communicative practices of teachers and learners might support or inhibit the acquisition of science or mathematics content. We will explore lecturing practices in traditional mathematics and science classes, both based on published reports and by watching and analyzing videos from different countries. We will consider the relationship between instructor learning goals (including hypothesized goals based on content-expertise), how that content is communicated, and affordances and constraints of those practices for student learning. We will consider the importance of note-taking practices on memory and learning, and, when possible, differences between ELL and L1 proficiencies. Finally, if time allows, we will consider the roles and types of feedback practices and analyze the language implications of those practices, including the symbolically dense aspects.

Required Textbook:

  • Mary J Schleppegrell (2007) The linguistic challenges of mathematics teaching and learning: A research review, Reading & Writing Quarterly, 23:2, 139-159. DOI: 10.1080/10573560601158461

ENES 8657: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 3):

Usage-Based Second Language Acquisition: Implicit and Explicit Learning and Their Interface

Professor:
Dr. Nick Ellis (University of Michigan, U.S.A.)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, July 13, 14:00-21:00
 
Sunday, July 14, 10:00-17:00

We learn language through our experiences of using language. Usage-based approaches to language investigate how this happens. Various disciplines collaborate in these inquiries. Corpus Linguistics explores the latent structure of the problem-space – the usage evidence from which we learn. Cognitive Linguistics details our language representations – the inventory of linguistic constructions as pairings of form and meaning or communicative function. Constructions range from simple morphemes like –ing, through lexis, to complex and abstract syntactic frames such as the Subject–Verb–Object–Object verb-argument construction. Psycholinguistics is the experimental study of language processing. Psycholinguistic demonstrations of effects of frequency upon language processing provide evidence of the implicit learning over usage of this variety of symbolic associations. Cognitive Psychology explores our complementary learning systems. Implicit learning occurs without conscious awareness; it involves simple learning mechanisms in the distributional analyses of the exemplars of a given form–meaning pair that take various characteristics of the exemplar into consideration, including how frequent it is and what kind of words and phrases and larger contexts it occurs with. Explicit learning involves more conscious, attentionally-focused, processing. It allows our learning of novel representations. Emergentism concerns how language learning is a gradual process in which the language system emerges as a complex and adaptive (continuously fine–tuned) system from the interaction of these cognitive learning mechanisms during language interactions with other speakers in various social settings and media. Applied Linguistics and cognitive psychology share a concern with the ways in which explicit learning impacts upon implicit learning. Answers to this issue of “interface” affect the ways we approach language acquisition, the ways we interact with learners, and whether and how we plan instruction. This course will illustrate the contributions of these approaches to our understanding of first and second language learning of morphology, lexis, and verb-argument constructions.

Doctoral Courses

For Ph.D 2012 and 2015 students only

EDUC 9998:

Dissertation Proposal Writing

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1-3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

Summer I or Summer II

This course is for those Ph.D. students who have passed the Qualifying Examination and working on their dissertation proposal.

The Ph.D. students are required to take Culminating Courses (6 semester hours overall, minimum 2 semester hours of EDUC 9999). Culminating Courses: Qualifying Exam Preparation Course (EDUC 9994), Proposal Writing Course (EDUC 9998) and Dissertation Writing Course (EDUC 9999).

EDUC 9999:

Dissertation Writing

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1-3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

Summer I or Summer II

Minimum 2 credit hours of EDUC 9999 are required for the Ph.D. Students.

Students wishing to register for this course should obtain permission from the professor and complete the registration process during the registration period.

EDUC 9282:

Research Apprenticeship

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

Summer I through Summer II

Ph.D. Students are required to take two 3-credit Research Apprenticeship courses.

If you wish to take an apprenticeship course, you first need to write a 300-400-word abstract of your proposed project (unless you are assisting a professor with one of his or her studies). This abstract should include basic information such as (a) the gaps in the literature you are addressing, (b) the purpose(s) of the study, (c) specific research questions, and (d) your methodology, including information about the participants, instruments, procedures, and the analyses you will perform. You will then need to send the abstract to the advisor you wish to work with (Consult the list of Apprenticeship advisors on the registration form to see who is available), and if the advisor approves your plan, you can then register for the course with that advisor.

For Ph.D. 2017 students only

Students in the Ph.D. program are required to take the doctoral seminar listed below.

EPSY 8827:

Research Design and Methodology

Professor:
Dr. Steven Ross
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 17 - July 27
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00-21:00
Saturday, 14:00-17:00

*Due to the relocation of TUJ Tokyo Campus in August, class schedule for this course will be changed.

For more details about the schedule, please check the schedule chart below.

EPSY8827 will review and consolidate the designs and research methods introduced in the two previous quantitative research methods courses. The syllabus will be expanded to include other research designs and novel analysis techniques such as event history analysis, variable rule analysis, multi-level modeling, structural equation models, and longitudinal research methods using latent growth models. Students will have the opportunity to expand and augment their research design and analysis repertoire with downloadable software such as HLM 7 and R. Hierarchical linear models will be used to assess the influence of contextual factors on both groups and individuals for various kinds of research designs. R will be used to model fixed and random effects for various language learning experiments such as those using grammaticality or reaction times as outcomes, as well for modeling linguistic variation. The use of AMOS will be revised and expanded to construct structural equation models and longitudinal latent growth curve models with individual differences covariates tested as moderating variables affecting various language learning-related phenomena.

This course is required for the Ph. D. degree.

Required Textbook:

Professor will use above textbook, as well as pdf files from journals for this course.

Dr. Ross's Class Schedule

Session Day Date Class Time Note
1 Friday May 17, 2019 18:00-21:00  
2 Saturday May 18, 2019 14:00-17:30 Additional 30 minutes
3 Friday May 31, 2019 18:00-21:00  
4 Saturday June 1, 2019 14:00-17:30 Additional 30 minutes
5 Friday June 14, 2019 18:00-21:00  
6 Saturday June 15, 2019 14:00-17:30 Additional 30 minutes
7 Friday June 28, 2019 18:00-21:00  
8 Saturday June 29, 2019 14:00-17:30 Additional 30 minutes
9 Friday July 12, 2019 18:00-21:00  
10 Saturday July 13, 2019 10:00-13:00 *Time Changed
11 Saturday July 13, 2019 14:00-17:30 Additional 30 minutes
12 Friday July 26, 2019 18:00-21:00  
13 Saturday July 27, 2019 14:00-17:30 Additional 30 minutes
13 Friday August 9, 2019 18:00-21:00  
14 Saturday August 10, 2019 14:00-17:00