Course Descriptions (Tokyo)

To register for any of the courses below, follow the procedures described in Course Registration. If you already know the process, go to the Registration Form.

Important Notice about Textbooks

To purchase textbooks, click Amazon link below next to each textbook title. In order to get your textbooks in time for the start of the semester, please order them as soon as you register for courses. Make sure to order through the provided Amazon links in this page.

Spring Semester 2019

FLED 5470:

Introduction to the Study of TESOL

Professor:
Dr. Tim Doe
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
January 10 - April 11
Day & Time:
Thursday, 18:00 - 21:00

Beginning students of TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) usually have two purposes: (1) to learn the academic skills they need to succeed at graduate work and (2) to discover the best ways to teach English to non-native speakers. In this course, students will achieve the first purpose, mastering necessary academic skills, while getting a head start on the second, understanding methods and issues of TESOL study. Academic skills include getting the most out of lectures and research articles, taking notes, accessing library and Internet resources, answering essay test questions, giving presentations, and writing papers using proper forms of citation, paraphrasing, and bibliographic references.

This course is designed for students who are new to the Master of Science in Education program, who have little or no experience studying in an English-language university, or who are not familiar with formal academic writing style (APA style). For such students, this course is recommended as the first course in the M.S.Ed. curriculum. Registrants who are not native speakers of English should have a TOEFL score of at least 550 on the paper-based test or 80 on the Internet-based test.

There will be 13 regular class sessions for this course and in addition to the regular class sessions, all the students will be required to attend any one of the three Distinguished Lecturer Seminars (only the first three hours of the Saturday session 14:00-17:00).

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Lightbown, P. M., & Spada, N (2013). How languages are learned (Oxford handbooks for language teachers) (4th ed.). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2010). Publication manual of the American psychological association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)
  • American Psychological Association. (2010). Concise rules of APA style (Concise rules of the American psychological association (APA) style) (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)
  • Richards, J. C. & Schmidt, R.W. (2010). Longman dictionary of language teaching and applied linguistics (4th ed.). Oxon, UK: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

TESL 5611:

Applied Language Study I: Phonology and the Lexicon

Professor:
Dr. Tomoko Nemoto
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
January 11 - April 12
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00 - 21:00

The primary purpose of this course is to introduce students to the basics of English phonetics and phonology, with an emphasis on areas of interest to language teachers. The course objectives are to: (1) introduce the basic concepts of phonetics and phonology; (2) provide practice in transcribing and analyzing the sound systems of native speakers and learners of English; (3) consider the place of pronunciation teaching in a foreign language curriculum and instructional approaches; (4) examine methods of assessing pronunciation; and (5) look at the relationship between pronunciation and other language skills. Students will complete a number of weekly assignments, take a mid-term examination and final examination, and conduct a project in which the speech of an English language learner is analyzed, a particular aspect of the English sound system is taught, and the results reported.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Celce-Murcia, M., Brinton, D.M., & Goodwin, J.M. (2010). Teaching pronunciation: A course book and reference guide (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Cambridge University Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2010). Publication manual of the American psychological association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

A set of readings will be available on Canvas.

TESL 5616:

Designing Assessment and Curriculum for Multicultural Students

Professor:
Dr. Robert Nelson
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
January 7 - April 8
Day & Time:
Monday, 18:00-21:00

The course reached its capacity. You will be put on the waiting list.

The first major purpose of this course is to give students the skills they need to develop and design language courses in all skill areas, with a special focus on materials design and assessment practices. The second purpose is to familiarize students with the states of the art in meaning-driven teaching methods (i.e., Task-, Project-, Theme-, and Content-based teaching) while respecting the importance of traditional grammar and vocabulary teaching to EFL audiences. These general principles form a framework within which students are introduced to the principles of cognitive linguistics that are relevant to teaching (e.g., construction and cognitive grammar, construal, and embodied meaning and metaphor). Students will learn to integrate their own situated observations with research findings to generate topically relevant material for any age group that meets the criteria laid out by any curriculum they follow. This material (lesson and task plans, texts, recordings, etc.) will support the teaching of the four skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) as well as the linguistic competencies of English. That is, students will leave the class able to employ the principles of meaning based linguistics and pedagogy to create motivating learning experiences that are flexible enough to fluidly switch between form and function foci. Course requirements include completing weekly readings, contributing to group discussions, completing a final examination and course projects, and compiling a teaching portfolio.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2010). Concise rules of APA style (Concise rules of the American psychological association (APA) style) (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

TESL 5618:

Second Language Development

Professor:
Dr. Tomoko Nemoto
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
January 10 - April 11
Day & Time:
Thursday, 18:00-21:00

The overarching purpose of this course is to canvass ten contemporary theories that are central to modern discussions of second language development (SLD) and to thereby provide the participants with an opportunity to further develop and consolidate their understanding of SLD, models of language representation and use, and issues that directly affect classroom teaching. In the first part of the course, we look at (a) early theories of second language development, (b) orders and sequences of acquisition, and (c) language transfer. In the second part of the course, the focus is on a number of theoretical positions, including (a) Usage-based approaches, (b) Skill-acquisition theory, and (c) Input processing. Finally, in the third part of the course, we read about (a) input, interaction, and output; (b) Sociocultural theory, and (c) instructed second language development, which concerns the practical application of a number of strands in the field of second language development. Students will participate in and lead numerous small group discussions, produce a synthesis of the course readings, take in-class examinations, and make a presentation on a self-selected SLD topic. Course participants should read Chapters 1-7 in Theories in Second Language Acquisition: An Introduction before the first class meeting.

The course is best taken by students who have already completed TESL 5611, TESL 5612 and TESL 5614, TESL 5616.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2010). Publication manual of the American psychological association (6th ed.).Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

FLED 5437:

Language and Culture

Professor:
Dr. Robert Nelson
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
January 9 - April 10
Day & Time:
Wednesday, 18:00-21:00

The course reached its capacity. You will be put on the waiting list.

This class is concerned with fundamental questions concerning the relationship of culture to language. It explores the complicated interactions of culture, language, society, and mind as it draws on research from linguistic pragmatics, sociolinguistics, linguistic and cognitive anthropology, cultural and cognitive psychology, and language philosophy. By the end of the semester, the student should understand the roles that language and culture play in the perception of self, others, and world; the role language plays in the transmission of cultural values and perspectives; the role of culture in the creation of durable social institutions (like money); the cultural and linguistic foundations of human cognition; and even how different cultural and linguistic practices are related to different educational outcomes. This course will emphasize the constitutive, normative, and interpretive functions of culture in general, but will elaborate those elements of English speaking culture important to language instruction. This course is intended to help pre- and in-service teachers understand and address cultural issues in the classroom, while providing general insight into the cultural functions of language. Successful students will complete all readings and participate in discussions, finish one individual and one group project, and write a final paper.

This course can be used as elective credit for M.S.Ed. and Ph.D degrees.

Required Textbook:

  • Henrich, J. (2016). The secret of our success: How culture is driving human evolution, domesticating our species, and making us smarter. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

Recommended Textbook:

EPSY 5529:

Language Assessment

Professor:
Dr. Edward Schaefer
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
January 8 - April 9
Day & Time:
Tuesday, 18:00-21:00

This course will help students develop the necessary working knowledge of the basic principles of test construction and testing procedures. It will also examine different types of test uses ranging from classroom-based assessment and placement examinations to criterion-referenced and growth-referenced tests. The course introduces topics such as measurement constructs and models of language knowledge, test reliability, the design of tests and assessments, item and task construction, scoring and rating tests and assessments, the training of raters, issues of fairness and standards, and the use of arguments and evidence in the support of test validation. Different perspectives on validity are also introduced. Students will participate in group discussions, take a mid-term and final examination, and produce a course project in which they experience the process of conceptualizing the theoretical bases of an assessment instrument, produce an instrument designed to measure a particular language skill (e.g., reading, grammar) or affective variable (e.g., motivation, self-efficacy), gather and analyze data using that instrument, and write a report on the strengths and weaknesses of the instrument. No prior knowledge of statistics is required, but as time allows there will be hands-on tasks utilizing two test analysis software programs, Winsteps and FACETS.

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees.

Required Textbook:

TESOL Special Projects - Distinguished Lecturer Series

This Lecturer Series will consist of three weekend seminars. Each seminar course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees. The first three hours of each seminar (Saturday, 14:00 to 17:00) are free and open to the public. Weekend seminars are free for Master's and doctoral graduates of Temple University Japan Campus for auditing; the fee for other weekend auditors is ¥13,000.

ENES 8655: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 1):

Instructed Second Language Acquisition

Professor:
Dr. Roy Lyster, the Professor of Emeritus (McGill University, Canada)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, January 12, 14:00-21:00
 
Sunday, January 13, 10:00-17:00

The aim of this course is to synthesize the results of various classroom-based studies of second language learning. A range of descriptive and quasi-experimental classroom studies will be examined, all of which explore ways in which teachers and learners integrate a focus on language form while maintaining a central focus on meaning in communicatively oriented classrooms. Studies of interaction between teachers and learners as well as between peers will be examined to explore a range of interactional moves and tasks hypothesized to enhance second language learning (e.g., corrective feedback, prompting, recasting, negotiation, scaffolding, metatalk, learner uptake, collaborative dialogue). Proactive approaches to second language instruction in classroom studies will also be examined to develop awareness of various types of planned pedagogical intervention that include input processing, input enhancement, and form-focused practice activities. Based on classroom studies, the effects of ISLA on a range of linguistic domains will be examined (i.e., grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, pragmatics), while taking into account the mediating roles of instructional context and individual differences. Students will develop an awareness of why certain language features are more difficult than others for classroom learners, and will be expected to critically assess what types of pedagogical intervention appear to be more effective than others.

Students taking this seminar for credit will be required to prepare following book.

Required Textbook:

ENES 8656: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 2):

Culture in the Language Classroom: Towards an Intercultural Pedagogy for Teaching

Professor:
Dr. Jonathan Newton (Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, February 16, 14:00-21:00
 
Sunday, February 17, 10:00-17:00

An often overlooked truth about language teaching is that the language teacher is a teacher of culture whether they know it or not or whether they like it or not. Culture and language are intertwined; language constructs and sustains culture just as culture shapes the language choices available to us and the impact of our language choices on others. In simple terms, "Every time we speak we perform a cultural act" (Kramsch, 1993).

How then can language teachers do justice to culture-in-language? More to the point, how can teachers more effectively exploit the affordances for intercultural learning available through learning another language? How can they do so in ways that enhance rather than distract from core language learning objectives. And how can they manage the many challenges and constraints that often mitigate against doing justice to culture? Such questions are at the forefront of a large body of recent scholarship on intercultural teaching and learning. Drawing on this scholarship, this course critically examines theoretical models and practical proposals for engaging with culture in the language classroom. Core topics include:

  • Culture and language
  • Culture in the EFL classroom: affordances, constraints and challenges
  • The conceptual foundations of intercultural language learning
  • Principles for intercultural communicative language teaching (i CLT)
  • Curricula, textbooks, and intercultural teaching
  • Successful models of intercultural teaching in Asian EFL contexts (including Japan)
  • Intercultural competence in the Common Framework of Reference (CFR)
  • English as an International Language (EIL) – what culture?

ENES 8657: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 3):

Optimizing Second Language Practice in the Classroom: Applying Insights from Cognitive/Educational Psychology to Second Language Learning

Professor:
Dr. Yuichi Suzuki (Kanagawa University, Japan)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, March 2, 14:00-21:00
 
Sunday, March 3, 10:00-17:00

Deliberate and systematic practice is essential to develop knowledge and skills for using a second language (L2) more accurately and fluently. It remains, however, largely unknown as to what constitutes optimal practice activities as well as when and how practice activities should be presented to L2 learners effectively. These complex, yet critical issues on L2 practice have been addressed in a growing body of literature, which aims to apply insights from cognitive and educational psychology research into L2 learning.

In this seminar, the lecturer will focus on the skill acquisition theory and present collection of empirical research to formulating a unified account of L2 practice. Three major areas of research on L2 practice are covered:

  1. cognitive foundations of practice (including skill acquisition theories, explicit-implicit knowledge and automatization, as well as their measurements),
  2. effectiveness of L2 practice (including definitions of practice, task repetition, distribution of practice, form-focused practice, and knowledge and skill transfer), and
  3. individual differences (including cognitive aptitude measurements, stability and trainability of cognitive aptitude, and aptitude-treatment interaction).

In the opening lecture, the lecturer will provide an overview of the major issues on L2 practice and highlight key empirical research findings. In the rest of the lecture, the lecturer will delve into relevant theories and empirical studies and critically evaluate them. Promising directions of future research will be then presented as well as pedagogical implications for L2 classrooms. Group discussions and activities are included in this seminar in order to deepen the understanding of the materials.

Doctoral Courses

For Ph.D 2012 and 2015 students only

EDUC 9998:

Dissertation Proposal Writing

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1-3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

This course is for those Ph.D. students who have passed the Qualifying Examination and working on their dissertation proposal.

The Ph.D. students are required to take Culminating Courses (6 semester hours overall, minimum 2 semester hours of EDUC 9999). Culminating Courses: Qualifying Exam Preparation Course (EDUC 9994), Proposal Writing Course (EDUC 9998) and Dissertation Writing Course (EDUC 9999).

EDUC 9999:

Dissertation Writing

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1-3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

Six credit hours of Education 9999 are required for Ph.D. candidates. The Ph.D. students are required to take Culminating Courses (6 semester hours overall, minimum 2 semester hours of EDUC 9999). Culminating Courses: Qualifying Exam Preparation Course (EDUC 9994), Proposal Writing Course (EDUC 9998) and Dissertation Writing Course (EDUC 9999).

Students wishing to register for this course should obtain permission from the professor and complete the registration process during the registration period.

EDUC 9282:

Research Apprenticeship

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

If you wish to take an Apprenticeship course, you first need to write a 300-400-word abstract of your proposed project (unless you are assisting a professor with one of his or her studies). This abstract should include basic information such as (a) the gaps in the literature you are addressing, (b) the purpose(s) of the study, (c) specific research questions, and (d) your methodology, including information about the participants, instruments, procedures, and the analyses you will perform. You will then need to send the abstract to the advisor you wish to work with (Consult the list of Apprenticeship advisors on the registration form to see who is available), and if the advisor approves your plan, you can then register for the course with that advisor.

For Ph.D. 2017 students only

Students in the Ph.D. program are required to take the doctoral seminars listed below.

EDUC 8102:

Intermediate Qualitative Research

Professor:
Dr. Eton Churchill
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
January 18 - April 13
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00-21:00
Saturday, 14:00-17:00

For more details about the schedule, please check the schedule chart below.

Building on fundamentals covered in Introduction to Qualitative Research (Spring 2018), this seminar aims to further participants’ skills in and understanding of research design, interviewing, data analysis, and writing as they work on developing projects related to their dissertations. Focusing on both qualitative and mixed-methods studies, we will begin by reviewing theoretical and methodological relationships between research topics, project designs, approaches to interviewing, and analysis. Based on this discussion and their own in-depth reading in a particular research area, students will conceptualize and revise the design of a pilot interview study involving a minimum of three individuals. We will review and explore interview techniques, and participants will develop an interview protocol consistent with their research aims. Working with their data, participants will gain further experience in qualitative analysis, and in the written presentation of this analysis.

Course activities will be organized around lectures, class and group discussions, and shared reflections on participants’ ongoing projects. Qualitative data analysis software will be introduced, approaches to discourse analysis illustrated, and particular attention devoted to textual analysis in the interest of developing writing skills. Three major writing assignments will focus in turn on project design, data analysis, and a final progress report.

As this course requires the design and implementation of a pilot study, participants are strongly encouraged to come to the first class with a research topic and a fine understanding of some exemplars (Mishler, 1990) in mind, and with a working bibliography in hand.

This course is required for the Ph. D. degree.

Required Textbook:

Dr. Churchill’s Class Schedule

Session Day Date Class Time Note
1 Friday January 18, 2019 18:00-21:00  
2 Saturday January 19, 2019 14:00-17:00  
3 Friday February 1, 2019 18:00-21:00  
4 Saturday February 2, 2019 14:00-17:00  
5 Friday February 15, 2019 18:00-21:00  
6 Saturday February 16, 2019 14:00-17:00  
7 Friday March 1, 2019 18:00-21:00  
8 Saturday March 2, 2019 14:00-17:00  
9 Friday March 15, 2019 18:00-21:00  
10 Saturday March 16, 2019 14:00-17:00  
11 Friday March 29, 2019 18:00-21:00  
12 Saturday March 30, 2019 14:00-17:00  
13 Friday April 12, 2019 18:00-21:00  
14 Saturday April 13, 2019 14:00-17:00  

EDUC 8506:

Second Language Acquisition

Professor:
Dr. David Beglar
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
January 11 - April 6
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00-21:00
Saturday, 14:00-17:00

For more details about the schedule, please check the schedule chart below.

The overarching purpose of this course is to canvass ten contemporary theories that are central to modern discussions of second language development (SLD) and to focus particularly on lexical processing, as it is widely considered the heart of language processing and use. Course participants will be provided with an opportunity to further develop and consolidate their understanding of SLD and models of language representation and use. In the first part of the course, we will look at Universal Grammar, Usage-based approaches, Skill-acquisition theory, and research into the brain and SLD. In the second part of the course, the focus is on a number of theoretical issues including language transfer, input processing, and interaction and output. In the third part of the course, we will focus on models of lexical processing. Students will participate in and lead numerous small group discussions, produce a paper synthesizing the course readings, write a literature review on a topic of their choosing, and make a presentation on the literature review. Course participants should read Chapters 1-7 in Theories in Second Language Acquisition: An Introduction and Chapters 1-5 in Lexical Processing and Second Language Acquisition before the first class meeting.

This course is required for the Ph. D. degree.

Required Textbook:

An additional set of readings will be available at the beginning of the course.

Dr. Beglar’s Class Schedule

Session Day Date Class Time Note
1 Friday January 11, 2019 18:00-21:00  
2 Saturday January 12, 2019 14:00-17:00  
3 Friday January 25, 2019 18:00-21:00  
4 Saturday January 26, 2019 14:00-17:00  
5 Friday February 8, 2019 18:00-21:00  
6 Saturday February 9, 2019 14:00-17:00  
7 Friday February 22, 2019 18:00-21:00  
8 Saturday February 23, 2019 14:00-17:00  
9 Friday March 8, 2019 18:00-21:00  
10 Saturday March 9, 2019 14:00-17:00  
11 Friday March 22, 2019 18:00-21:00  
12 Saturday March 23, 2019 14:00-17:00  
13 Friday April 5, 2019 18:00-21:00  
14 Saturday April 6, 2019 14:00-17:00