Course Descriptions (Tokyo)

To register for any of the courses below, follow the procedures described in Course Registration. If you already know the process, go to the Registration Form.

Important Notice about Textbooks

To purchase textbooks, click Amazon link below next to each textbook title. In order to get your textbooks in time for the start of the semester, please order them as soon as you register for courses. Make sure to order through the provided Amazon links in this page.

Spring Semester 2020

FLED 5470:

Introduction to the Study of TESOL

Professor:
Dr. Ron Martin
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
January 9 - April 9
Day & Time:
Thursday, 18:00-21:00

The session 12 on Thursday, March 26 is cancelled. In lieu of Session 12 (March 26), Professor will require students to attend one weekend seminar instead, and students will be required to write a homework assignment about it.

Beginning students of TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) usually have two purposes: (1) to learn the academic skills they need to succeed at graduate work and (2) to discover the best ways to teach English to non-native speakers. In this course, students will achieve the first purpose, mastering necessary academic skills, while getting a head start on the second, understanding methods and issues of TESOL study. Academic skills include getting the most out of lectures and research articles, taking notes, accessing library and internet resources, answering essay test questions, giving presentations, and writing papers using proper forms of citation, paraphrasing and bibliographic references.

This course is designed for students who are new to the Master of Science in Education program, who have little or no experience studying in an English-language university, or who are not familiar with formal academic writing style (APA style). For such students, this course is recommended as the first course in the M.S.Ed. curriculum. Registrants who are not native speakers of English should have a TOEFL score of at least 550 on the paper-based test or 80 on the internet-based test.

There will be 13 regular class sessions for this course and in addition to the regular class sessions, all the students will be required to attend any one of the three Distinguished Lecturer Weekend Seminars (only the first three hours of the Saturday session) scheduled in summer. The professor will provide you with further details about the seminar requirement later in the classroom.

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2010). Publication manual of the American psychological association. (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)
  • Richards, J. C., & Schmidt, R.W. (2010). Longman dictionary of language teaching and applied linguistics. (4th ed.). Oxon, UK: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

* Recommended textbook is available as electronic resource via TU library portal.

TESL 5611:

Applied Language Study I: Phonology and the Lexicon

Professor:
Dr. Tomoko Nemoto
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
January 7 - April 7
Day & Time:
Tuesday, 18:00-21:00

The primary purpose of this course is to introduce students to the basics of English phonetics and phonology, with an emphasis on areas of interest to language teachers. The course objectives are to: (1) introduce the basic concepts of phonetics and phonology; (2) provide practice in transcribing and analyzing the sound systems of native speakers and learners of English; (3) consider the place of pronunciation teaching in a foreign language curriculum and instructional approaches; (4) examine methods of assessing pronunciation; and (5) look at the relationship between pronunciation and other language skills. Students will complete a number of weekly assignments, take a mid-term examination and final examination, and conduct a project in which the speech of an English language learner is analyzed, a particular aspect of the English sound system is taught, and the results reported.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Celce-Murcia, M., Brinton, D.M., & Goodwin, J.M. (2010). Teaching pronunciation: A course book and reference guide. (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Cambridge University Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2010). Publication manual of the American psychological association. (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

TESL 5616:

Designing Assessment and Curriculum for Multicultural Students

Professor:
Dr. Robert Nelson
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
January 8 - April 8
Day & Time:
Wednesday, 18:00-21:00

The first major purpose of this course is to give students the skills they need to develop and design language courses in all skill areas, with a special focus on materials design and assessment practices. The second purpose is to familiarize students with the states of the art in meaning-driven teaching methods (i.e., Task-, Project-, Theme-, and Content-based teaching) while respecting the importance of traditional grammar and vocabulary teaching to EFL audiences. These general principles form a framework within which students are introduced to the principles of cognitive linguistics that are relevant to teaching (e.g., construction and cognitive grammar, construal, and embodied meaning and metaphor). Students will learn to integrate their own situated observations with research findings to generate topically relevant material for any age group that meets the criteria laid out by any curriculum they follow. This material (lesson and task plans, texts, recordings, etc.) will support the teaching of the four skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) as well as the linguistic competencies of English. That is, students will leave the class able to employ the principles of meaning based linguistics and pedagogy to create motivating learning experiences that are flexible enough to fluidly switch between form and function foci. Course requirements include completing weekly readings, contributing to group discussions, completing a final examination and course projects, and compiling a teaching portfolio.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

Recommended Textbook:

TESL 5618:

Second Language Development

Professor:
Dr. David Beglar
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
January 10 - April 10
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00-21:00

The overarching purpose of this course is to canvass ten contemporary theories that are central to modern discussions of second language development (SLD) and to thereby provide the participants with an opportunity to further develop and consolidate their understanding of SLD, models of language representation and use, and issues that directly affect classroom teaching. In the first part of the course, we look at (a) early theories of second language development, (b) orders and sequences of acquisition, and (c) language transfer. In the second part of the course, the focus is on a number of theoretical positions, including (a) Usage-based approaches, (b) Skill-acquisition theory, and (c) Input processing. Finally, in the third part of the course, we read about (a) input, interaction, and output; (b) Sociocultural theory, and (c) instructed second language development, which concerns the practical application of a number of strands in the field of second language development. Students will participate in and lead numerous small group discussions, produce a synthesis of the course readings, take in-class examinations, and make a presentation on a self-selected SLD topic. Course participants should read Chapters 1-7 in Theories in second language acquisition: An introduction before the first class meeting.

The course is best taken by students who have already completed TESL 5611, TESL 5612, TESL 5613, TESL 5614 and TESL 5616.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • VanPatten, B., & Williams, J. (Eds.). (2015). Theories in second language acquisition: An introduction. (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

Recommended Textbook:

FLED 5437:

Language and Culture

Professor:
Dr. Robert Nelson
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
January 6 - April 6
Day & Time:
Monday, 18:00-21:00

This class is concerned with fundamental questions concerning the relationship of culture to language. It explores the complicated interactions of culture, language, society, and mind as it draws on research from linguistic pragmatics, sociolinguistics, linguistic and cognitive anthropology, cultural and cognitive psychology, and language philosophy. By the end of the semester, the student should understand the roles that language and culture play in the perception of self, others, and world; the role language plays in the transmission of cultural values and perspectives; the role of culture in the creation of durable social institutions (like money); the cultural and linguistic foundations of human cognition; and even how different cultural and linguistic practices are related to different educational outcomes. This course will emphasize the constitutive, normative, and interpretive functions of culture in general, but will elaborate those elements of English speaking culture important to language instruction. This course is intended to help pre- and in-service teachers understand and address cultural issues in the classroom, while providing general insight into the cultural functions of language. Successful students will complete all readings and participate in discussions, finish one individual and one group project, and write a final paper.

This course can be used as elective credit for M.S.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees.

Required Textbook:

  • Henrich, J. (2016). The secret of our success: How culture is driving human evolution, domesticating our species, and making us smarter. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

Recommended Textbook:

EPSY 5541:

Introduction to Psycholinguistics

Professor:
Dr. Terry Joyce
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
January 8 - April 15
Day & Time:
Wednesday, 18:00-21:00

The session 9 on Wednesday, March 4 is cancelled. The make-up session will be held on Wednesday, April 15, 18:00-21:00.

Language is unquestionably a defining feature of the human species; it is the incredibly powerful symbol system that enables us to think and to share our thoughts with others. At the intersection of psychology and linguistics, psycholinguistics seeks primarily to comprehend both the amazing complexity and power of human language and its inherent limitations and biases, by investigating the mental processes involved in acquiring and using language. Thus, it draws on both linguistic descriptions of language phenomenon and psychological experimentation in order to examine the psychological validity of such descriptions within the larger context of cognitive science.

This Introductory Psycholinguistics course attempts to provide an overview of the main areas of contemporary psycholinguistic research. After initially describing the basic psycholinguistic approach, the second block of the course will turn to consider the mental processes involved within language acquisition, touching the critical period hypothesis and language disorders. The third major block will focus on the mental processes involved in language usage, by looking at both language comprehension and production at various levels. The final block will focus on more semantic aspects of the mental lexicon, concluding with a brief outline of the implications of linguistic relativism for the relationship between language and thinking.

Course participants should read assigned course materials, actively participate in classes, write two course papers and complete a final examination.

This course can be used as elective credit for M.S.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees.

Required Textbook:

  • No required textbook

Recommended Textbook:

Recommended textbook is available as electronic resource via TU library portal. Accordingly, although a second edition was published in 2017, as not available via library, sticking with first edition.

EDUC 5325:

Foundation of Educational Statistics

Professor:
Dr. Tomoko Nemoto
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
January 9 - April 9
Day & Time:
Thursday, 18:00-21:00

This course has been canceled

The purpose of this course is to help students learn basic statistics to be able to better understand quantitative research results in the field of SLA and to become familiar with a data analysis software package, JASP. Course participants will learn the concepts of basic descriptive statistics, basic probability theory, hypothesis testing, z-scores, t-tests, correlation analysis, basic Analysis of Variance, and basic regression models. Based on the knowledge they gain in the class, students will also review, analyze, and critique published research in the field. Course participants will also use JASP to learn the basics of data entry and how to read statistical output with small data sets. Participants will do regular assignments using various statistical analyses, take midterm and final examinations, and write a course project.

This introductory course is designed for students who have no background in statistics or who have not conducted statistical analyses for a long time, but a willingness to learn basic mathematical symbols and formulae is necessary. This course is also recommended for the students who are interested in conducting quantitative research in the future and who would like to increase their basic knowledge of statistics.

In addition, all students will be required to attend the opening session of Distinguished Lecturer Series Seminar-II (Dr. Scott Crossley) from 14:00-17:00 on Saturday, February 15th.

This course can be used as elective credit for M.S.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees.

Required Textbook:

  • Loerts, H., Lowie, W., & Seton, B. (2019). Essential statistics for applied linguistics: Using R or JASP. (2nd ed.). London, UK: Red Globe Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

Doctoral Courses

EDUC 9991:

Research Apprenticeship

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

Ph.D. students are required to take two 3-credit Research Apprenticeship courses.

If you wish to take an apprenticeship course, you first need to write a 300-400-word abstract of your proposed project (unless you are assisting a professor with one of his or her studies). This abstract should include basic information such as (a) the gaps in the literature you are addressing, (b) the purpose(s) of the study, (c) specific research questions, and (d) your methodology, including information about the participants, instruments, procedures, and the analyses you will perform. You will then need to send the abstract to the advisor you wish to work with (Consult the list of Apprenticeship advisors on the registration form to see who is available), and if the advisor approves your plan, you can then register for the course with that advisor.

EDUC 9994:

Preliminary Examination Preparation

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
By Arrangement

This course is available for the Ph.D. students to register in the semester they take the Preliminary Examination.

EDUC 9998:

Dissertation Proposal Design

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1-3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

This course is for those Ph.D. students who have passed the Preliminary Examination and working on their dissertation proposal.

The Ph.D. students are required to take Culminating Courses (6 semester hours overall, minimum 2 semester hours of EDUC 9999). Culminating Courses: Preliminary Preparation Course (EDUC 9994), Dissertation Proposal Design Course (EDUC 9998) and Doctor of Education Dissertation Course (EDUC 9999).

EDUC 9999:

Doctor of Education Dissertation

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1-6 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

Minimum 2 credit hours of EDUC 9999 are required for the Ph.D. students.

Students wishing to register for this course should obtain permission from the professor and complete the registration process during the registration period.

TESOL Special Projects - Distinguished Lecturer Series

This Lecturer Series will consist of three weekend seminars. Each seminar course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees. The first three hours of each seminar (Saturday, 14:00 to 17:00) are free and open to the public. Weekend seminars are free for master’s and doctoral graduates of Temple University Japan Campus for auditing; the fee for other weekend auditors is ¥13,000. This course can be used as elective credit (1 credit) for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees.

ENES 8655: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 1)

On the Role of Multi-Word Expressions in Language Learning and Use

Professor:
Dr. Anna Siyanova (Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, January 25 from 14:00 to 21:00
 
Sunday, January 26 from 10:00 until 17:00

The last decade has seen an unprecedented interest in the acquisition, processing and use of multi-word expressions (MWEs). The last few years, in particular, have been instrumental in our gaining better understanding of the role played by elements above word level in first (L1) and second language (L2) learning and use. MWEs are frequent and/or highly familiar phrases that exhibit a degree of fixedness and are recognized as conventional by mature language users. Examples of MWEs include, among others, collocations (strong tea), binomials (bride and groom), phrasal and prepositional verbs (tell off), idioms and proverbs (better late than never), grammatical constructions (this is X), and other phrasal configurations. MWEs constitute a large proportion of authentic spoken and written discourse, which renders them an essential component of proficient language use.

This series of seminars will follow a recently published volume on the various aspects of MWEs. In particular, we will focus on MWEs in the usage-based tradition, corpus linguistics and learner corpus research, L2 pedagogy and academic discourse, and language processing. We will look at some of the L1 and L2 differences, as well as a central place of phrase frequency effects in MWE enquiry. The pertinent evidence will be discussed and analyzed in view of methodological rigor and replicability. The interdisciplinary seminars will be of interest to research students working in the area of vocabulary and second language acquisition, corpus and cognitive linguistics, and psycholinguistics.

Required Textbook:

  • Siyanova-Chanturia, A., & Pellicer-Sánchez, A. (Eds.). (2019). Understanding formulaic language: A second language acquisition perspective. New York, NY: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

The book is required for doing the course assignments.

ENES 8656: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 2)

Psycholinguistics

Professor:
Dr. Scott Crossley (Georgia State University, U. S. A.)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, February 15 from 14:00 to 21:00
 
Sunday, February 16 from 10:00 until 17:00

Psycholinguistics is concerned with how language is acquired, used, stored, and processed cognitively. This course will offer an introduction to the field of psycholinguistics with a specific focus on language learner data. The opening lecture will provide an overview of psycholinguistics theory and methods. The remainder of the course will cover research areas including word recognition, the reading process, semantic networks, and word meaning. Major theories, research questions, and related empirical findings in each area will be discussed. Most importantly, students will become familiar with the tools and methods used in psycholinguist research through the participation in and replication of classic and modern psycholinguistic experiments including the analysis of psycholinguistic data.

By the end of the course, students are expected to achieve the following objectives:

  1. Understand the major theories/models of language processing, production, and acquisition.
  2. Have working knowledge of psycholinguistic experimental paradigms, related technology, and data analysis.
  3. Understand the relationships between applied linguistics, language acquisition, and psycholinguistics.
  4. Produce, develop, and disseminate psycholinguistic knowledge.

Prerequisite Skills and Knowledge Needed for Seminar Participation
Having basic computer literacy will help in developing on-line experiments using experimental software. Basic knowledge of statistical terms, theories, and techniques will assist students in examining psycholinguistic data.

Computer Software Needed for Participation for the Entire Weekend
Attendees who attend the entire seminar are required to bring a personal computer that is running an updated version of Windows or Mac OS operating system. These attendees will need to have two applications already installed on their computers. Both of these applications are free to download and use. The first, OpenSesame, will be used to develop psycholinguistic experiments and collect data. The second, JASP, will be used for statistical analysis of the data. Students familiar with R are welcome to use it instead of JASP for statistical analyses.

Required Readings:
A collection of articles and book chapters will be provided as required readings.

Other requirement:
The laptop is required for those people staying after the public session. Please make sure to bring your own laptop to this seminar if you are staying for the entire weekend.

ENES 8657: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 3)

Effective Techniques for Teaching and Learning L2 Writing

Professor:
Dr. Eli Hinkel (Seattle Pacific University, U. S. A.)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, March 14 from 14:00 to 21:00
 
Sunday, March 15 from 10:00 until 17:00

L2 writing instruction has the goal of developing learners’ skills directly relevant to producing written text. These skills necessarily include grammar and vocabulary. For learners, becoming fluent and proficient in using vocabulary and grammar takes a great deal of time and work simply because the English grammar system is complex, and the number of words to be learned, retained, and practiced is enormous. There are, however, effective strategies that learners and teachers can use to make the learning process more efficient.

Language analyses demonstrate unambiguously that recurrent multiword units and prefabricated expressions are extremely common in both speech and writing. Efficient learning strategies take advantage of this characteristic of English.

Teaching grammar for writing cannot take place in isolation from the lexical properties of text and recurrent multiword phrases (Hinkel, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2020).

  • In language uses of any kind, many words are combined in various patterns to create new meanings that cannot be predicted from the meaning of their component parts.
  • Lexical phrases can be rigid and inflexible in their forms, or flexible with variable components.

Examples of recurrent phrases are myriad: a recent/new development, a wide/broad range, based on/on the basis of, give an example, give credit, give rise to, in general, in sum, make a decision, make a point, on the one hand, on the other hand, take into account.

This seminar offers highly practical suggestions for teaching vocabulary, grammar, and phrasal constructions that occur frequently in written texts. These suggestions target specific areas of L2 writing and maximize language gains by employing a few shortcuts. By focusing on teaching vocabulary and phrases, as well as adding to the students’ range of frequent grammar constructions, teachers can help students L2 writers develop their productive skills.