Course Descriptions (Osaka)

To register for any of the courses below, follow the procedures described in Course Registration. If you already know the process, go to the Registration Form.

Important Notice about Textbooks

To purchase textbooks, go to the summer course description page of the TUJ Grad Ed website and click on the links provided there for your book order. In order to get your books in time for summer semester, please order them as soon as you have registered for summer 2021 courses.

Summer Semester 2021

Summer Session I: May 6-June 23

FLED 5470:

Introduction to the Study of TESOL

Professor:
Dr. Nathaniel Carney
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 10-July 26
Day & Time:
Monday, 18:00-21:00

The session 13 on Monday, August 2, 2021 will be cancelled. In lieu of the session, the make-up session will be held on Wednesday, May 12, 18:00-21:00.

The primary purposes of this course are (a) to help new students develop essential academic skills for succeeding in the M.S.Ed program and (b) to provide an introductory overview of the field of TESOL.

In this course, students will develop academic skills related to reading academic texts, analyzing research, and synthesizing findings in writing and oral presentations. Students will learn how to search the library for TESOL-related research, summarize and critique journal articles, and format writing according to APA guidelines.

The overview of the field of TESOL will include themes such as theories and characteristics of first and second language learning, individual differences, and naturalistic versus classroom-based L2 learning. Students will develop their understanding and use of TESOL-related terminology, and they will become familiar with current concerns in TESOL teaching and research. Students will be expected to engage actively in classroom discussions, sharing understanding and perspectives about course material content.

There will be 13 regular class sessions for this course and in addition to the regular class sessions, all students will be required to attend one of the two online Distinguished Lecturer Weekend Seminars (only the first three hours of the seminar).

The course is designed for students who are new to the M.S.Ed. program, who have little or no experience studying in an English-language university, and/or are not familiar with formal academic reading, writing, discussion, and presentation.

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2020). Publication manual of the American psychological association. (7th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp (the amazon publication year indicated as 2019) / Buy on Amazon.com)

ENES 8645:

Teaching and Learning Vocabulary

Professor:
Dr. Stuart McLean
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 6-June 22
Day & Time:
Tuesday and Thursday, 18:00-21:00

The course is focused on teaching, learning, and L2 vocabulary research (i.e., single words and multi-word units). We will look at a range of topics, such as what is involved in knowing a word; how much vocabulary is needed when using the four major skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing; acquiring; using specialized vocabulary; learning words from context; and learning multi-word units. The course has two primary aims. The first aim is for participants to become familiar with the wide variety of research that makes up the field of second language vocabulary acquisition. The second aim, which rests on the foundation provided by the first, is to develop the knowledge and skills necessary to create an effective plan for teaching vocabulary in a course or in a foreign-language curriculum.

Course participants will read extensively, complete in-class tasks regarding vocabulary teaching and learning, participate in and lead small group discussions, conduct a course project by analyzing the lexical composition of learning materials. Participants will also make an in-class presentation about their course project. By the end of the course, course participants should be aware of the major issues pertinent to teaching, learning, and researching second-language vocabulary, be able to design a vocabulary component for a language course, and advise teachers and learners on vocabulary learning strategies. Students will submit notes taken during the first three hours of Dr. Kristopher Kyle’s online weekend seminar on Saturday, June 12. Course participants should read the first seven chapters in Learning Vocabulary in Another Language before the first-class meeting.

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees.

Required Textbook:

EDUC 8252:

Globalization and Language Teaching

Professor:
Dr. Mark Sawyer
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 10-June 23
Day & Time:
Monday and Wednesday, 18:00-21:00

The overall course goal is to familiarize participants with the impacts of forces of globalization on language teaching, with due consideration to local reactions, and with abundant examples from Japan. Participants will grasp how these forces have shaped current options in terms of methodologies, materials, and employment, and will anticipate how these forces may evolve. This will facilitate participants' optimal decisions in their teaching practices and career progression.

The course will examine relevant manifestations of five categories of global forces/flows:

  1. People: flows of expatriate teachers, international students, company employees, tourists, and immigrants/refugees, as well as their reception by locals.
  2. Technology: options for tasks and communication inside and beyond classrooms, e.g. learning management systems, social media services, video chat (FaceTime, Zoom, Skype), translation software.
  3. Economics: teachers’/students’/policy-makers' choices, leading to, inter alia, expansion of English-medium instruction and English as official company language in non-Anglophone nations, promotion of global textbooks and tests, intellectual property issues, supplementary education, and opportunities and constraints regarding employment.
  4. Media: teachers’/students’ options for foreign language materials, e.g. international news, advertisements, celebrity gossip, popular culture (e.g. games, anime, K-Pop, hip-hop).
  5. Ideas: teachers’/students’/policy-makers’ beliefs about language learning/teaching, including (a) target, e.g. “standard” varieties, Globish, English as an International Language, World Englishes, English as a Lingua Franca; (b) methodology, e.g. communicative, task-based, engaged/critical, and related issues such as native-speakerism and translanguaging; and (c) goals, e.g. TOEFL/TOEIC score, communicative competence, intercultural competence, intercultural citizenship.

Requirements include online written discussion contributions, at least one oral presentation reacting to recently published research, and a final project exploring a course sub-area.

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees.

Required Textbook:

  • No required textbook. Readings for each session will be available on the Canvas LMS.

Recommended Textbook:

Summer Session II: June 24-August 11

FLED 5470:

Introduction to the Study of TESOL

*Continued from Summer Session I

Professor:
Dr. Nathaniel Carney
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 10-July 26
Day & Time:
Monday, 18:00-21:00

EDUC 5010:

Individual Differences in Second Language Acquisition

Professor:
Dr. Matthew Apple
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
June 25-August 10
Day & Time:
Tuesday and Friday, 18:00-21:00

This course provides an overview of current theory and research into the influence of psychological constructs on foreign language learning. Readings and discussions will center around such important concepts as personality, language aptitude, motivation, and anxiety, among others. In order to further deepen their understanding of these variables and learn how they can be operationalized for future research, students will be given an opportunity to try out and assess research instruments commonly used to measure these constructs. Students will also be encouraged to explore the pedagogical implications of these constructs in order to better understand their role in language learning and how educators can capitalize on these differences in an attempt to more effectively instruct their students. In addition to the main textbook, course participants will submit weekly summary assignments of journal articles and answer questions about their contents, lead several in-class group discussions to deepen their knowledge and understanding of concepts and variables presented in class by the instructor, and write two course papers (one short literature review and one longer research or pedagogical project).

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees.

Required Textbook:

  • Mercer, S., Ryan, S., & Williams, M. (Eds.). (2012). Psychology for language learning: Insights from research, theory and practice. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

Recommended Textbook:

EDUC 9993:

Master’s Comprehensive Examination

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
By Arrangement

This course is required for M.S.Ed. students who matriculated in or after Spring 2019. Students are required to register for this course in the semester they take the M.S.Ed. Comprehensive Examination. This course is a Pass/Fail course. If the student is taking the January Comprehensive Exam, the student must register for this course in the spring semester. If the student is taking the May Comprehensive Exam, the student must register for this course in the summer semester.

Students who matriculated before Spring 2019, but wish to take this course as part of their 30 credits requirement must consult with the Administrative Director prior to their registration.

Doctoral Courses

EDUC 9991:

Research Apprenticeship

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement (Summer I through Summer II)

Ph.D. students are required to take two 3-credit Research Apprenticeship courses.

If you wish to take an apprenticeship course, you first need to write a 300-400-word abstract of your proposed project (unless you are assisting a professor with one of his or her studies). This abstract should include basic information such as (a) the gaps in the literature you are addressing, (b) the purpose(s) of the study, (c) specific research questions, and (d) your methodology, including information about the participants, instruments, procedures, and the analyses you will perform. You will then need to send the abstract to the advisor you wish to work with (Consult the list of Apprenticeship advisors on the registration form to see who is available), and if the advisor approves your plan, you can then register for the course with that advisor.

EDUC 9998:

Dissertation Proposal Design

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1 to 3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement (Summer I or Summer II)

This course is for those Ph.D. students who have passed the Preliminary Examination and working on their dissertation proposal.

The Ph.D. students are required to take Culminating Courses (6 semester hours overall, minimum 2 semester hours of EDUC 9999). Culminating Courses: Preliminary Preparation Course (EDUC 9994), Dissertation Proposal Design Course (EDUC 9998) and Doctor of Education Dissertation Course (EDUC 9999).

EDUC 9999:

Doctor of Education Dissertation

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1 to 6 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement(Summer I or Summer II)

Minimum 2 credit hours of EDUC 9999 are required for the Ph.D. students.

Students wishing to register for this course should obtain permission from the professor and complete the registration process during the registration period.

For Ph.D. 2020 students only

Students in the Ph.D. 2020 Cohort are required to take both doctoral courses listed below in summer 2021.

EDUC 8405:

Quantitative Analysis, Part II

Professor:
Dr. Steven Ross
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 7-July 31
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00-21:00
Saturday, 14:00-17:00

For more details about the schedule, please check the schedule chart below.

The Quantitative Analysis II course will build from the foundations laid in the introductory statistics course. The second quantitative methods syllabus will review the fundamentals of research design with an emphasis on designs that optimize internal and external validity. Students will review common designs used in applied linguistics research, with a particular focus on sampling, randomization, and intervening variables, as well as how statistical controls are built into designs. The second quantitative course will in particular aim to build and expand students' expertise in using JASP and R by extending their repertoire of quantitative analysis techniques including multiple linear regression, analysis of residuals, binary and multinomial logistic regression, discriminant function analysis, univariate and multivariate analysis of variance models, analysis of covariance, factorial repeated measures, multilevel models, and time series regression models. We will also explore Bayesian inference using the freeware JASP. This course will establish a springboard from which participants can extend into more advanced research methods such as event history analysis, variable rule analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, multilevel and mixed effects models, structural equation modeling, and growth curve modeling. Selected exemplars from the research literature will be utilized.

This course is required for the Ph.D. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • No textbook required.

Dr. Ross’s Class Schedule

Session Day Date Class Time Note
1 Friday May 7, 2021 18:00-21:00  
2 Saturday May 8, 2021 14:00-17:00  
3 Friday May 21, 2021 18:00-21:00  
4 Saturday May 22, 2021 14:00-17:00  
5 Friday June 4, 2021 18:00-21:00  
6 Saturday June 5, 2021 14:00-17:00  
7 Friday June 18, 2021 18:00-21:00  
8 Saturday June 19, 2021 14:00-17:00  
9 Friday July 2, 2021 18:00-21:00  
10 Saturday July 3, 2021 14:00-17:00  
11 Friday July 16, 2021 18:00-21:00  
12 Saturday July 17, 2021 14:00-17:00  
13 Friday July 30, 2021 18:00-21:00
14 Saturday July 31, 2021 14:00-17:00  

TESL 8643:

Researching Listening and Speaking

Professor:
Dr. David Beglar
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 14-August 7
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00-21:00
Saturday, 14:00-17:00

For more details about the schedule, please check the schedule chart below.

The acquisition of listening and speaking skills has formed the heart of the field of second language acquisition since its inception in modern times, and as a result, the majority of the research conducted in the field has been focused on the acquisition of aural-oral skills. The primary purpose of this course is to allow participants to explore theoretical and practical issues concerning research into the acquisition of second language listening and speaking skills and to get an overview of the methodological approaches that have been used to investigate these two areas. We will examine theories of language comprehension and production, read and analyze recent research in which listening and/or speaking were investigated, and consider how the research that has been conducted to date can be enhanced. Course participants will complete weekly homework assignments, analyze and critique previous studies, plan and carry out a small-scale research project investigating an aspect of listening or speaking development, lead and take part in group discussions, take a final examination, and make a presentation. Course participants should read Chapters 1-6 in Teaching and Researching Listening before the first class meeting.

This course is required for the Ph. D. degree.

Required Textbook:

Dr. Beglar’s Class Schedule

Session Day Date Class Time Note
1 Friday May 14, 2021 18:00-21:00  
2 Saturday May 15, 2021 14:00-17:00  
3 Friday May 28, 2021 18:00-21:00  
4 Saturday May 29, 2021 14:00-17:00  
5 Friday June 11, 2021 18:00-21:00  
6 Saturday June 12, 2021 14:00-17:00  
7 Friday June 25, 2021 18:00-21:00  
8 Saturday June 26, 2021 14:00-17:00  
9 Friday July 9, 2021 18:00-21:00  
10 Saturday July 10, 2021 14:00-17:00  
11 Friday July 23, 2021 18:00-21:00  
12 Saturday July 24, 2021 14:00-17:00  
13 Friday August 6, 2021 18:00-21:00
14 Saturday August 7, 2021 14:00-17:00  

TESOL Special Projects - Distinguished Lecturer Series

This Lecturer Series will consist of two weekend seminars in summer 2021. Each seminar course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees. The first session (three hours) of each seminar is free and open to the public. Weekend seminars are free for master’s and doctoral graduates of Temple University Japan Campus for auditing; the fee for other weekend auditors is ¥13,000 (a nonrefundable auditor’s fee). In light of the global impact of COVID-19, the weekend seminars for this semester will be conducted 100% on Zoom. For the details, please read the following descriptions carefully:

ENES 8655: Seminar 1

Measuring Productive Lexical Proficiency in Learner Corpora

Professor:
Dr. Kristopher Kyle (University of Oregon, U. S. A.)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
3-hour online Zoom sessions for four days
Saturday, June 12 from 10:00 to 13:00
Sunday, June 13 from 10:00 to 13:00
Saturday, June 19 from 10:00 to 13:00
Sunday, June 20 from 10:00 to 13:00

Students taking this seminar for credit must attend all four days.

This seminar will be conducted by 3-hour online Zoom sessions for four days: Saturday, June 12, Sunday, June 13, Saturday, June 19 and Sunday, June 20 from 10:00 to 13:00 (JST). Students taking this seminar for credit must attend all four days. Students can add/drop this seminar course by 14:00 on Saturday, June 12.

The pre sign-up (or course registration for those who are taking this seminar for credit) is required for anybody attending the public session on Saturday, June 12 from 10:00 to 13:00. The sign-up process must be completed through "Distinguished Lecturer Series Seminar Sign-Up Form" that is available on TUJ Grad Ed website. The sign-up deadline is Friday, June 11 at 12:00. The public session Zoom link will be provided to those people who completed the online sign-up (or course registration) process between 17:00-18:00 on Friday, June 11.

Lexical proficiency is an essential component of effective written and spoken communication, and is commonly measured as the proportion of sophisticated or advanced words a language learner uses to complete a particular task. Most often, a word’s reference corpus frequency determines the degree to which it is considered advanced or sophisticated (e.g., Laufer & Nation, 1995). While frequency is undoubtedly an important feature of sophistication, a number of recent studies have demonstrated that lexical proficiency is most accurately modeled when multiple complementary lexical and lexicogrammatical features are used (e.g., Kim, Crossley, & Kyle, 2018; Kyle, Crossley, & Berger, 2018).

This seminar will first provide an introduction to lexical (e.g., frequency and concreteness) and lexicogrammatical (e.g., the association of word combinations) features that affect perceptions of lexical proficiency from both theoretical and empirical perspectives. The broad implications for pedagogical considerations will also be discussed. In the next portions of the seminar, students will be led through a hands-on workshop in which an analysis of lexical sophistication will be conducted using an open-source learner corpus. Finally, students will demonstrate their understand of theoretical and practical concerns surrounding the analysis of lexical sophistication by independently conducting a preliminary study.

ENES 8656: Seminar 2

Applied Methods for Researching and Teaching L2 Pronunciation

Professor:
Dr. Alyssa Kermad (California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, U.S.A.)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
3-hour online Zoom sessions for four days
 
Saturday, June 26 from 10:00 to 13:00
Sunday, June 27 from 10:00 to 13:00
Saturday, July 3 from 10:00 to 13:00
Sunday, July 4 from 10:00 to 13:00

Students taking this seminar for credit must attend all four days.

This seminar will be conducted by 3-hour online Zoom sessions for four days: Saturday, June 26, Sunday, June 27, Saturday, July 3 and Sunday, July 4 from 10:00 to 13:00 (JST). Students taking this seminar for credit must attend all four days. Students can add/drop this seminar course by 14:00 on Saturday, June 26.

The pre sign-up (or course registration for those who are taking this seminar for credit) is required for anybody attending the public session on Saturday, June 26 from 10:00 to 13:00. The sign-up process must be completed through "Distinguished Lecturer Series Seminar Sign-Up Form" that is available on TUJ Grad Ed website. The sign-up deadline is Friday, June 25 at 12:00. The public session Zoom link will be provided to those people who completed the online sign-up (or course registration) process between 17:00-18:00 on Friday, June 25.

The overarching aim of this seminar is to develop an awareness of the area of second language (L2) English speech and pronunciation which has received increasingly more attention and importance over the years, especially considering that there are currently more non-native English speakers than native English speakers. This seminar takes a bottom-up approach to the topic, beginning with an overview of the English sound system, including segmental and suprasegmental properties of speech. This seminar will cover core concepts of David Brazil’s (1997) framework of intonation, including the context of interaction, prominent syllables, tone units, pitch, and intonation. Instruction will be provided for analyzing and quantifying speech properties related to fluency, word stress, sentence prominence, pitch, and intonation. Praat, a speech analysis software, will be used alongside this instruction to visually illustrate the physical correlates of these speech properties. The seminar will conclude with discussions on the topics of research and teaching in L2 speech and pronunciation. For research, this seminar will survey recent findings related to L2 speech patterns, especially those with a focus on suprasegmental production. This seminar will also consider important methodological issues in research design. Finally, for teaching, this seminar will explore the applications of Praat for teaching and learning in the language classroom.

Required Computer Software:

  • Attendees are encouraged to download Praat (a free speech analysis software) (Boersma & Weenink, 2021), available for MAC and PC at this link: https://www.fon.hum.uva.nl/praat/

Required Textbook:

  • Pickering, L. (2018). Discourse intonation: A discourse-pragmatic approach to teaching the pronunciation of English. Ann arbor, MI: The University of Michigan Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

Recommended Textbook: