Course Descriptions (Osaka)

To register for any of the courses below, follow the procedures described in Course Registration. If you already know the process, go to the Registration Form.

Important Notice about Textbooks

To purchase textbooks, go to the fall course description page of the TUJ Grad Ed website and click on the links provided there for your book order. In order to get your books in time for fall semester, please order them as soon as you have registered for fall 2021 courses.

Fall Semester 2021

September 6 - December 18, 2021

TESL 5612:

Applied Language Study II: Grammar, Morphology and Classroom Discourse

Professor:
Dr. David Beglar
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
September 6 - December 18
Day & Time:
Monday, 18:00-21:00

The acquisition of morphology and syntax (i.e., morpho-syntax) has been at the heart of the field of second language acquisition since its modern inception in the 1970s. The reason for this focus is simple: Acquiring these aspects of a foreign language is extremely difficult for most adult foreign language learners given the complexity and abstractness of many morpho-syntactic forms. This course has three main goals. The first goal is to become more familiar with basic aspects of English morpho-syntax (e.g., the syntax of declarative statements, question formation, negation, and embedding) in order to better understand some of the key morpho-syntactic mechanisms used in the English language. The second goal is to become conversant with a wide variety of empirical research into the acquisition of English morpho-syntax. This body of research includes theoretical investigations of the cognitive mechanisms held responsible for the acquisition of morpho-syntax as well as classroom applications of various pedagogical approaches used to teach particular aspects of English grammar. The third goal is to give course participants an opportunity to conduct a hands-on teaching project in which they use a pedagogical approach that is new to them for teaching one aspect of English morpho-syntax. In this way, the participants can expand the pedagogical techniques available to them. Other course assignments include weekly readings, sentence-diagramming tasks, leading and participating in small group discussions, and a final examination. Participants should read Chapters 1-7 in The Grammar Book before the first class meeting.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Larsen-Freeman, D., & Celce-Murcia, M. (2016). The grammar book: Form, meaning, and use for English language teachers. (3rd ed.). Boston, MA: Heinle Cengage Learning. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp (the amazon publication year indecated as 2015) / Buy on Amazon.com)
  • American Psychological Association. (2020). Publication manual of the American psychological association. (7th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (A Kindle edition is also available.) (Buy on Amazon.co.jp (the amazon publication year indicated as 2019) / Buy on Amazon.com)

TESL 5613:

Multilingual Students' Literacy Development

Professor:
Dr. David Beglar
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
September 8 - December 8
Day & Time:
Wednesday, 18:00-21:00

While the ability to comprehend and speak a language is achieved by virtually all people, such is not the case with the two literacy skills of reading and writing. Millions of people in the world are illiterate or semi-literate, a situation that has powerful implications for their ability to function successfully in modern technological societies in which increasingly sophisticated literacy skills are required. The first purpose of this course is to consider a “what:” What are reading and writing? What are the component parts of these skills, and how does our understanding of those component parts influence our teaching of the skills? The second purpose of the course is to consider a second “what:” What reading and writing tasks and activities are available to teachers? In this portion of the course, we will consider a wide variety of tasks that have been developed for teaching these two skills and their probable effectiveness in the light of our understanding of what reading and writing are. The third purpose of the course is to consider a “how:” How can teachers synthesize their knowledge of what they believe reading and writing to be with the tasks that are available to them in order to produce an effective and coherent reading or writing course? This final purpose will allow course participants to consider how they can design their own reading and writing courses and modify existing ones to make them more effective. Course participants will lead and take part in numerous group discussions, take a midterm and final test, and conduct a course project. Participants should read the first four chapters in the course textbooks before the first class session.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. students who completed the matriculation process after fall 2018 semester. Students who completed the matriculation process by fall 2018 can take this course for the elective credits.

This course is required or Elective for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Ferris, D. R., & Hedgcock, J. (2014). Teaching L2 composition: Purpose, process, and practice. (3rd ed.). New York, NY: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp (the amazon publication year indicated as 2013) / Buy on Amazon.com)
  • Grabe, W., & Stoller, F. L. (2020). Teaching and researching reading. (3rd ed.). New York, NY: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp (the amazon publication year indicated as 2019) / Buy on Amazon.com)
  • American Psychological Association. (2020). Publication manual of the American psychological association. (7th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (A Kindle edition is also available.) (Buy on Amazon.co.jp (the amazon publication year indicated as 2019) / Buy on Amazon.com)

TESL 5614:

Current Approaches to Teaching English Language Learners

Professor:
Dr. Paul Leeming
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
September 10 - Decemer 10
Day & Time:
Fridayy, 18:00-21:00

The purpose of this course is to enable participants to develop an awareness of second language theory and classroom practice. Issues to be investigated include: an account of the central processes of learning and the conditions believed to promote language acquisition; the elements of a language learning curriculum and their relation to the processes by which learners acquire language; current approaches to language teaching; and various types of materials and activities believed to foster acquisition. Participants will be encouraged to consider how these issues relate to their own classroom contexts and develop a personal set of teaching principles. Sessions will cover topics such as the roles of input, output, form-focused instruction, fluency development, motivation, and task-based language teaching.

In addition to required reading, participants will take a mid-term and a final examination, make written responses to important issues discussed in the course, lead a number of small group discussions, write a course paper focused on a topic related to the course, and make a short, oral presentation.

The session 10 on Friday, November 12 is cancelled. In lieu of the sessions, students will be required to attend the first session of Dr. Uchihara’s weekend seminar on Saturday, October 30 from 10:00-13:00.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2020). Concise guide to APA style. Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp (the amazon publication year indicated as 2019)/ Buy on Amazon.com)

Additional readings will be provided in a course reading packet.

EDUC 8274:

Contexts for Content Teaching and Learning

Professor:
Dr. Tamara Swenson
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
September 9 - December 9
Day & Time:
Thursday, 18:00-21:00

The role of content in language teaching, how much does it belong in the foreign language class and how it should be integrated with language learning outcomes to promote language learning, has been a debate since the 1980’s. An extensive body of research demonstrates that “content-based instruction is typically more effective than ‘text-based’ instruction across a wide range of L2 instructional contexts” (Brinton, et al., 2006, p 2).

Content-based instruction (CBI) is the integration of content instruction and foreign language teaching. More recently, Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) has become an umbrella term describing the joint learning of a content subject such as science or history with a foreign language, thereby learning new content and the language simultaneously. In all its manifestations, content-based language teaching is based on the principle that successful language learning occurs when students are presented with target language material in meaningful, contextualized forms where the primary focus is on acquiring information and knowledge. Content is the organizing principle, and aspects of language (linguistic structures, vocabulary, functions) are presented as needed.

The goal of this course is to clarify the complexities in CBI and identify key features of effective content-based programs that can be applied with learner groups of various ages. Participants will explore the theoretical underpinnings of CBI, design content-based units of instruction, and develop the knowledge and skills necessary to be an effective content plus language teacher in a wide range of language teaching contexts.

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees.

Required Textbook:

  • Snow, M. A., & Brinton, D. M. (Eds.). (2017) The content-based classroom: New perspectives on integrating language and content. (2nd ed.).Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

Other required readings will be provided through Canvas.

Recommended Textbook:

EDUC 9993:

Master’s Comprehensive Examination

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
By Arrangement

This course is required for M.S.Ed. students who matriculated in or after Spring 2019. Students are required to register for this course in the semester they take the M.S.Ed. Comprehensive Examination. This course is a Pass/Fail course. If the student is taking the January Comprehensive Exam, the student must register for this course in the spring semester. If the student is taking the May Comprehensive Exam, the student must register for this course in the summer semester.

Students who matriculated before Spring 2019, but wish to take this course as part of their 30 credits requirement must consult with the Administrative Director prior to their registration.

Doctoral Courses

EDUC 9991:

Research Apprenticeship

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

Ph.D. students are required to take two 3-credit Research Apprenticeship courses.

If you wish to take an apprenticeship course, you first need to write a 300-400-word abstract of your proposed project (unless you are assisting a professor with one of his or her studies). This abstract should include basic information such as (a) the gaps in the literature you are addressing, (b) the purpose(s) of the study, (c) specific research questions, and (d) your methodology, including information about the participants, instruments, procedures, and the analyses you will perform. You will then need to send the abstract to the advisor you wish to work with (Consult the list of Apprenticeship advisors on the registration form to see who is available), and if the advisor approves your plan, you can then register for the course with that advisor.

EDUC 9998:

Dissertation Proposal Design

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1 to 3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

This course is for those Ph.D. students who have passed the Preliminary Examination and working on their dissertation proposal.

The Ph.D. students are required to take Culminating Courses (6 semester hours overall, minimum 2 semester hours of EDUC 9999). Culminating Courses: Preliminary Preparation Course (EDUC 9994), Dissertation Proposal Design Course (EDUC 9998) and Doctor of Education Dissertation Course (EDUC 9999).

EDUC 9999:

Doctor of Education Dissertation

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1 to 6 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

Minimum 2 credit hours of EDUC 9999 are required for the Ph.D. students.

Students wishing to register for this course should obtain permission from the professor and complete the registration process during the registration period.

For Ph.D. 2020 students only

Students in the Ph.D. 2020 Cohort are required to take the doctoral course listed below in fall 2021.

Textbook

To purchase textbooks, go to the fall course description page of the TUJ Grad Ed website and click on the link to Amazon for each required textbook. In order to get your books in time for fall semester, please order them as soon as you have registered for fall 2021 courses.

EDUC 8506:

Second Language Acquisition

Professor:
Dr. Robert Nelson
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
September 17 - December 11
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00-21:00
Saturday, 14:00-17:00

For more details about the schedule, please check the chart below.

This course looks at the full range of approaches that constitute contemporary Second Language Acquisition/Second Language Development (SLA/SLD), with special foci on: (a) how the field is changing in response to the emergence of functionalist approaches in linguistics and embodied/situated cognitive science, (b) advanced applications of quantitative methods in SLD, and (c) psycholinguistic methods in SLD. The course has two theoretical aims. The first is to survey the current range of approaches to the study of second language development. The second is to explore fully the conceptual foundations of usage-based approaches to second language development, paying special attention to how these approaches construe the learner and learning processes. Course projects will include group presentations, worked projects in R, and a final research proposal.

This course is required for the Ph. D. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Plonsky, L. (Ed.). (2015). Advancing quantitative methods in second language research. New York, NY: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)
  • Mackey, A., & Gass, S. M. (Eds.). (2012). Research methods in second language acquisition: A practical guide. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp (the amazon publication year indicated as 2011) / Buy on Amazon.com)
  • Robinson, P., & Ellis, N. C. (Eds.). (2008). Handbook of cognitive linguistics and second language acquisition. New York, NY: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)
  • Jegerski, J., & VanPatten, B. (Eds.). (2014). Research methods in second language psycholinguistics. New York, NY: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

Dr. Nelson’s Class Schedule

Session Day Date Class Time Note
1 Friday September 17, 2021 18:00-21:00  
2 Saturday September 18, 2021 14:00-17:00  
3 Friday October 1, 2021 18:00-21:00  
4 Saturday October 2, 2021 14:00-17:00  
5 Friday October 15, 2021 18:00-21:00  
6 Saturday October 16, 2021 14:00-17:00  
7 Friday October 29, 2021 18:00-21:00  
8 Saturday October 30, 2021 14:00-17:00  
9 Friday November 12, 2021 18:00-21:00  
10 Saturday November 13, 2021 14:00-17:00  
11 Friday November 26, 2021 18:00-21:00  
12 Saturday November 27, 2021 14:00-17:00  
13 Friday December 10, 2021 18:00-21:00
14 Saturday December 11, 2021 14:00-17:00  

TESOL Special Projects - Distinguished Lecturer Series

This Lecturer Series will consist of two weekend seminars in fall 2021. Each seminar course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees. The first session (three hours) of each seminar is free and open to the public. Weekend seminars are free for master’s and doctoral graduates of Graduate College of Education, Temple University Japan Campus for auditing; the fee for other weekend auditors is ¥13,000 (a nonrefundable auditor’s fee). In light of the global impact of COVID-19, the weekend seminars for this semester will be conducted 100% on Zoom. For the details, please read the following descriptions carefully:

ENES 8655: Seminar 1

Vocabulary Research in ESP: Raising Issues and Connecting to Practice

Professor:
Dr. Averil Coxhead (Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
3-hour online Zoom sessions for four days
Saturday, October 16 from 10:00 to 13:00
Sunday, October 17 from 10:00 to 13:00
Saturday, October 23 from 10:00 to 13:00
Sunday, October 24 from 10:00 to 13:00

Students taking this seminar for credit must attend all four days.

This seminar will be conducted by 3-hour online Zoom sessions for four days: Saturday, October 16, Sunday, October 17, Saturday, October 23 and Sunday, October 24 from 10:00 to 13:00 (JST). Students taking this seminar for credit must attend all four days. Students can add/drop this seminar course by 14:00 on Saturday, October 16.

The pre sign-up (or course registration for those who are taking this seminar for credit) is required for anybody attending the public session on Saturday, October 16 from 10:00 to 13:00. The sign-up process must be completed through "Distinguished Lecturer Series Seminar Sign-Up Form" that is available on TUJ Grad Ed website. The sign-up deadline is Friday, October 15 at 12:00. The public session Zoom link will be provided to those people who completed the online sign-up (or course registration) process between 17:00-18:00 on Friday, October 15.

The focus of lecture series is firstly on identifying and discussing issues in quantitative and qualitative research into vocabulary in English for Specific Purposes (ESP) and secondly on connecting this research to practice. The session begins with an overview of vocabulary research in ESP and why vocabulary is important in this field. The focus then moves to research on the development of word lists and the evaluating them in ESP, because they are a key contribution to teaching, learning and research. The next session looks into research which uses word lists and what issues arise when we consider vocabulary in written and spoken language in ESP. Next, we will look at research that focuses on teachers and learners in vocabulary for ESP, and consider what this research adds to our understandings of the field and what issues arise from it. Finally, we will look for opportunities and challenges for connecting this research to classrooms and to future possible research. There will be plenty of time for questions.

ENES 8656: Seminar 2

L2 Spoken Vocabulary Acquisition, Instruction, and Assessment

Professor:
Dr. Takumi Uchihara (Waseda University, Japan)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
3-hour online Zoom sessions for four days
 
Saturday, October 30 from 10:00 to 13:00
Sunday, October 31 from 10:00 to 13:00
Saturday, November 6 from 10:00 to 13:00
Sunday, November 7 from 10:00 to 13:00

Students taking this seminar for credit must attend all four days.

This seminar will be conducted by 3-hour online Zoom sessions for four days: Saturday, October 30, Sunday, October 31, Saturday, November 6 and Sunday, November 7 from 10:00 to 13:00 (JST). Students taking this seminar for credit must attend all four days. Students can add/drop this seminar course by 14:00 on Saturday, October 30.

The pre sign-up (or course registration for those who are taking this seminar for credit) is required for anybody attending the public session on Saturday, October 30 from 10:00 to 13:00. The sign-up process must be completed through "Distinguished Lecturer Series Seminar Sign-Up Form" that is available on TUJ Grad Ed website. The sign-up deadline is Friday, October 29 at 12:00. The public session Zoom link will be provided to those people who completed the online sign-up (or course registration) process between 17:00-18:00 on Friday, October 29.

The past few decades have witnessed an upsurge in the number of second language (L2) vocabulary studies and provided several important implications for vocabulary teaching and learning. The vast majority of earlier studies however have largely focused on written input as a main source of learning (e.g., reading graded readers), engaging learners with word-focused activities in written format (e.g., writing sentences, gap-filling), and measuring the written forms of L2 words (e.g., Vocabulary Size Test). Not as much research attention has been directed towards the spoken forms of L2 words.

The goal of this seminar is to highlight existing L2 vocabulary studies focusing on spoken vocabulary acquisition, instruction, and assessment, and discuss how we as researchers and practitioners can undertake future studies in these areas. In this seminar, we will address a number of questions revolving around L2 spoken vocabulary, including “How is vocabulary learned through exposure to spoken input?” “How can we optimize the effect of spoken input on vocabulary learning?” “To what extent does spoken output promote vocabulary learning?” “To what extent is vocabulary knowledge associated with L2 oral proficiency?” and “How should we measure receptive and productive knowledge of spoken forms of L2 words?”