SWU students chatting with TUJ students at the entrance of the TUJ campus

 

Japan campus of Temple University (TUJ) expands its ties with nearby Showa Women’s University (SWU) as both agree to cooperate in the enrollment of qualified SWU students into the Master in Management (MiM) program offered at TUJ.

The agreement enables SWU to launch a new program, the “3+1 program”, which allows its undergraduate students to graduate in three years and complete TUJ’s MiM program in one year. The new program at SWU is implemented from the current academic year in April.

In 2020 Temple University launched the MiM program simultaneously at TUJ and the main campus in Philadelphia. The one-year graduate program offers recent college graduates from all backgrounds a comprehensive introduction to the world of business. Students build on critical thinking and analytical skills developed during undergraduate studies and increase their career marketability with essential business skills. They can conclude the program with built-in time to pursue an internship.

TUJ’s MiM program is one of the master’s programs offered at Temple University Fox School of Business, which is accredited by AACSB (Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business) International. AACSB is one of the world’s leading business school accreditation organizations.

“This collaboration provides a seamless pathway for students at Showa Women’s University to gain business education and an American master’s degree,” says William J. Swinton, assistant dean of international business at TUJ. “SWU students will study side by side with other aspiring business professionals from around the world. Our innovative program helps students study accounting, marketing, data analysis, finance, information technology, and people management—in one year.”

Since TUJ moved to Sangenjaya in 2019, both TUJ and SWU have been strengthening ties through academic and extracurricular activities. TUJ and SWU students can take classes on each other’s campus and their credits can be transferred to their home institutions.