Course Descriptions for Summer 2020

Last update: April 1, 2020

This tentative course schedule is subject to change.

Legal Research and Writing

Professor:
Mason Hester, Attorney
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Mondays, 18:45-21:30

This course explores legal research, writing, and advocacy. After being introduced to the U.S. legal system and basic research techniques (including on-line databases such as LexisNexis), students work on assigned problems to develop their writing and analytical skills. The program aims to develop basic legal research and writing skills in an informal, hands-on seminar atmosphere.

Note: This course is required of all LL.M. in U.S. Law Candidates.

Civil Procedure

Professor:
S. Rochelle McCrackin, Adjunct Professor of Law
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Tuesdays, 18:45-21:30

Civil Procedure concerns the rules and principles governing civil actions in state and federal court. This course will address the fundamental issues of court jurisdiction over the parties and the subject matter of a dispute; and the related issues of venue, conflict of laws, and the applicable body of law applied to disputes. Additional issues which will be covered include: notice and pleading requirements, joinder of additional parties/claims, obtaining evidence by discovery, and the preclusive effect of decisions. The course will focus primarily on the federal courts and the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure.

Note: This subject is tested on many U.S. Bar Examinations.

Comparative Corporate Governance: Writing Seminar

Professor:
Kate Borun, Adjunct Professor of Law
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Wednesdays, 18:45-21:30

This course explores Japanese and U.S. corporate law, broadly defined. It will examine issues relating to corporate governance and ownership, including, for example, the legal structure of business entities in the U.S. and Japan; the duties of directors; and the roles of shareholders and employees. The course may also cover issues relating to the role of investors in and regulators of publicly traded corporations. It will not provide a comprehensive overview of either Japanese or U.S. corporate law. But it will examine issues that both jurisdictions confront, with the goal of developing a better understanding of the role of corporate law in Japan and the U.S. and the lessons that each might offer the other.

Criminal Law

Professor:
Johnathan McCaskill, Adjunct Professor of Law, Legal Consultant
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Thursdays, 18:45-21:30

This course involves a basic study of criminal law and examines the elements of a number of major crimes. It will also analyze various principles and historical trends that influence important prerequisites to the government's taking of one's liberty through incarceration. In this crime and punishment course, the effect of an alleged criminal actor's mental state, affirmative defenses, and responsibility for other's actions will be covered.

Note: This subject is tested on many U.S. Bar Examinations.

Guided Research

Professor:
Tina Saunders, Director and Associate Professor of Instruction in Law, Temple Law School, Japan Campus
Credit Hours:
2 or 3
Day & Time:
-

This independent research offers students an opportunity to (1) satisfy the mandated writing requirement, (2) develop research, writing and analytical abilities through producing a single substantive research paper and (3) work with a faculty member in an area of the teacher's interest or expertise. Students have a Faculty member agree to supervise them and must submit a signed Approval form to the Registrar to request participation.

Note: This course has limited availability subject to a supervising Professor’s approval. This course satisfies the advanced writing requirement for all LL.M. Candidates.

*Learn more about faculty at www.tuj.ac.jp/law/faculty