Course Descriptions for Spring 2019

Last update: October 24, 2018

Advising the Multinational Company on Global Legal Issues

Professor:
Jonathan Lipson
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Tuesdays, 18:30-21:30
Room:
Mita 403

This interactive and participatory course is intended to provide a survey of the types of issues confronting lawyers, and particularly in-house lawyers, who advise multinational corporations on a worldwide basis. The areas to be discussed include topics that will cross corporate law (including M&As), tax law, labor and employment law, employee benefits, litigation and corporate compliance. Real life examples will be used to illustrate the complicated nature yet importance of this type of practice. Further, in addition to the more substantive legal topics to be covered, the course will also be interspersed with practice tips, jurisdictional practice highlights and ethical considerations for the multinational practitioner.

Constitutional Law

Professor:
Joe Sasanuma
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Mondays, 18:30-21:30
Room:
Mita 402

Judicial review of legislative and executive actions in a constitutional setting, the relationship of the states to the federal government (Federalism), the relationship of the people to government (Bill of Rights) and the powers of the Congress are considered.

Note:

  • Not open to J.D. Study-abroad Students.
  • This subject is tested on many U.S. Bar Examinations.

East-West Negotiation

Professor:
Doug Hymas and Bryan Koslow
Credit Hours:
3 credits (Pass/Fail)
Day & Time:
Thursdays, 18:30-21:30
Room:
Mita 502

This pass/fail cour se introduces students to the practical, legal, and cultural issues encountered when drafting and negotiating international agreements in the Asian context. The course particularly emphasizes negotiations involving American and Japanese parties through the examination of actual international commercial transactions. Students have an opportunity to participate in the preparation of mock agreements and negotiations.

Note: This course satisfies the skills graduation requirement.

International Contract Drafting

Professor:
Stan Yukevich and Julie Miller
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Wednesdays, 18:45-21:45
Room:
Mita 402

This course bridges the gap between contract theory and contract practice and offers practical insights into international contracts such as licenses, distributorships and joint ventures. It will principally focus on developing skills in drafting these types of contracts, although students may also have to undertake ancillary preparation exercises.

Note:

  • This course satisfies the advanced writing requirement for LL.M. students.
  • This course satisfies the skills graduation requirement for J.D. students.
  • This course has limited enrollment.

International Development Law and Policy: Writing Seminar

Professor:
Vipasha Bansal
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Mondays, 15:00-17:00
Room:
Mita 503

This course will examine how law and legal institutions shape economic, political and social development in both theory and practice. We will look at some key texts and debates to understand the theoretical foundations of the field. We will also look at development practice from a lawyer's perspective, drawing on examples from both developed and developing countries. These case studies will help us critically examine questions such as: Do urban slum residents have the same access to justice as their wealthier neighbors? Which corporate structures should a developing economy adopt? Do intellectual property rights form a barrier to improving public health? What is the rule of law and why are economists promoting it? The aim of the course is not to find definitive answers to development questions. Rather, students will be encouraged to think broadly and deeply about development and how law relates to it.

Notes: This course satisfies the graduation advanced writing requirement.

International Taxation

Professor:
Dean Page and Paul Previtera
Credit Hours:
2 credits
Day & Time:
Jan. 8, 9, 10, 12, 16, 17 &19 (7 classes, 2 weeks)10:00-14:00 (1/12&19), 9:00-12:00 (all other class times)
Room:
Mita 405

This course covers fundamental concepts in U.S. taxation of international transactions, both inbound (U.S. taxation of income received by foreign individuals or entities) and outbound (U.S. taxation of the foreign operations of United States taxpayers). The course will address questions of residence, jurisdiction to tax, source of income, the foreign tax credit, tax treaties, transfer pricing, and the operations of the controlled subsidiaries of United States corporations.

Notes: Intensive 2-week course schedule beginning on January 8.

Introduction to the American Legal System

Professors:
Tina Saunders
Credit Hours:
2 credits
Day & Time:
Wednesdays, 18:30-20:30
Room:
Mita 503

This Course is intended to provide the student from a non-common law background with an introduction to the basic concepts, structures and institutions of the American Legal System. Topics to be covered include: historical origins of the common law system; common law method; the structure of the United States government, Federal and State; the Constitution; judicial review, structure, organization and operations of courts in the United States, civil litigation, case analysis and precedent: the legislative branch: statutes and legislative history; and the executive branch: administrative law.

Introduction to Japanese Law

Professor:
Setsuo Miyazawa
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Wednesdays, 14:30-17:30
Room:
Mita 503

This course introduces students to Japanese law and the major principles of civil law systems. Students will examine the history, structure, and content of the Japanese legal system, the role of domestic and international law in Japan, the Japanese Constitution, and the major areas of Japanese law. To better equip students for transnational work involving Japanese entities, the course will focus on how Japanese laws, regulations, and culture affect corporations, business transactions, and individual rights in Japan. It will also consider the role of Japanese law in promoting transnational investment, current issues in the practice of law in Japan, and several current social issues on which law has an impact. Students with a law degree from a Japanese university cannot enroll in this class.

Notes:

  • Students with a law degree from a Japanese university cannot enroll in this class.
  • J.D. study-abroad students are strongly encouraged to enroll in this course.

Professional Responsibility

Professor:
Ric Fouad
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Tuesdays, 18:30-21:30
Room:
Mita 402

This core course — also known as the “Law of Lawyering” — focuses on the practical and ethical questions that attorneys constantly face. These range from signing up new clients and evaluating complex conflicts of interest scenarios to unrepresented party interaction and attorney advertising. Utilizing select case law excerpts, the Model Code of Professional Responsibility, American Bar Association Committee on Ethics opinions, the California Rules of Professional Conduct, relevant sections of the California Business and Professions Code, select state and local bar ethics opinions, and topical news articles, the class takes a real world approach to Professional Responsibility. It will also help prepare students for the M.P.R.E., as Professional Responsibility is tested on Bar Exams throughout the U.S. The societal role of attorneys in shaping our judicial system is also a focus, particularly issues of racism and wealthism in skewing the scales of justice.

Note: This subject is tested on many U.S. Bar Examinations.

Secured Transactions

Professor:
Jonathan Lipson
Credit Hours:
2 credits
Day & Time:
Thursdays, 18:30-20:30
Room:
Mita 403

Creation, perfection and enforcement of security interests in personal property under Article Nine of the Uniform Commercial Code. A major component of this offering concerns the interaction of Article Nine with the Federal Bankruptcy Law and the effect of the bankruptcy law upon a lender's decisions and expectations.

Note: This subject is tested on many U.S. Bar Examinations.

Guided Research

Professor:
Tina Saunders
Credit Hours:
2 or 3
Day & Time:
 
Room:
 

This independent research offers students an opportunity to (1) satisfy the graduation advanced writing and research requirement; (2) develop research, writing and analytical abilities through producing a single substantive research paper; and (3) work with a faculty member in an area of the teacher's interest or expertise. Students have a Faculty member agree to supervise them and must submit a signed Approval form to the Registrar to request participation.

Notes:

  • Satisfy the graduation advanced writing and research requirement
  • This course has limited enrollment.

Survival Japanese

Professor:
Akiko Yoshida
Credit Hours:
Non-credit
Day & Time:
1/11,14, 15, 18, 21, 23, 25, 28, 30 and 2/1 (10 classes) 11:00-13:00
Room:
Mita 405

This course is intended to give students with little to no Japanese language ability, basic speaking and listening proficiency to be able to live comfortably in Tokyo for the semester.

Beginner Business Japanese

Professor:
Nozomi Takano
Credit Hours:
Non-credit
Day & Time:
1/22, 24, 29, 31, 2/5, 7, 8, 12, 14 and 15 (10 classes) 11:00-14:00
Room:
Mita 405

This course is intended for students with little to no Japanese language experience and will focus on Japanese speaking and writing in business, including practice making self-introductions and job interviewing

U.S. Bar Exam Study Course (non-credit)

Professor:
Mason Hester
Credit Hours:
Non-credit
Day & Time:
1/12, 19, 26, 2/2, 16, 23, 3/2, 16, 30, 4/6, 5/18, 25, 6/1 & 8 (14 classes), Saturdays, 10:00-13:00
Room:
Mita 502

This course is a comprehensive lecture series on techniques and strategies to take a U.S. state bar exam. This class will help prepare you for the bar exam, the multistate/multiple-choice section (“the MBE”), state essays, and the multistate performance test (“MPT”) questions. The course will use many different resources, including doctrinal lectures, classroom discussions, substantive outlines, many practice questions, and individual coaching. In this class, as with the bar exam, what matters most is results, and our goal is to make sure that each of you can use these various inputs to produce successful outcomes.

Notes:

  • Open to 3L J.D. students and LL.M. students.
  • This course has limited enrollment.