Events

Past Events

Time:
19:30 (Door open at 19:00)
Speaker:
  • Ian Condry (Cultural anthropologist and Professor at MIT)

As sci-fi writer William Gibson has said, “The future is already here; it is just unevenly distributed.”  With the on-going decline of the recording industry, music offers a natural experiment in emerging forms of social economies, and thus presents pictures of what a post-capitalist future might be.  By comparing diverse examples of how musicians make livelihoods today, we can observe how social and economic values are complexly intertwined. Examples are drawn from Japan and the US, and will include pop idols (real and virtual), the underground DJ scene, and crowd-funding efforts to support musical projects.

Time:
19:30 (Door open at 19:00)
Speaker:
  • Andrew L. Oros (Professor of Political Science and Director of International Studies, Washington College)

For decades after World War II, Japan chose to focus on soft power and economic diplomacy alongside a close alliance with the United States. Since the end of the Cold War, and especially during the rise of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, Japan’s military capabilities have resurged. In this analysis of Japan’s contemporary security policies, Andrew L. Oros shows how a “gradual awakening” to new security challenges has culminated in the multifaceted “security renaissance” of the past decade. Contested memories of the Pacific War and Imperial Japan, postwar anti-militarist convictions, and an unequal relationship with the United States still play an outsized role. In Japan’s Security Renaissance Oros argues that Japan’s…
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Time:
19:30 (Door open at 19:00)
Speakers:
  • Mihoko Matsubara (Chief Security Officer Japan, Palo Alto Networks)
  • Scott Jarkoff (Senior Security Advisor at McAfee)

Mihoko Matsubara (Chief Security Officer Japan, Palo Alto Networks) fireside chat with Scott Jarkoff (McAfee) followed by a Q&A session Since Tokyo was selected to host the Summer Olympic Games 2020 in September 2013, Japan has been accelerating its efforts to enhance its national cybersecurity capabilities in terms of policy-making, cyberthreat information-sharing, and human resources development. In 2017, the Japanese government will issue three national cybersecurity strategy documents. Mihoko Matsubara will survey Japan’s initiatives in the field of cybersecurity over the last three years and analyze the outlook for the next three years.

Time:
19:30 (Door open at 19:00)
Panelists:
  • Régis Arnaud
  • Guillaume Gerondeau
  • Benjamin Lasry (joining by live video)

On May 7, French voters elected Emmanuel Macron to the presidency. Though he was the most pro-EU, pro-globalization of all the candidates, in the first round nearly half of the voters chose politicians dedicated to upending the post-World War Two liberal order. On May 17, we will hold a panel discussion with several experts to analyze the results of the election and to discuss its implications for Europe and the world in the wake of Brexit, the victory of Donald Trump, and the rise of extremism in many other western societies. Note: All panelists will be speaking in their personal capacity, not on behalf of their employers.  

Time:
12:30 (Door open at 12:00)
Speakers:
  • Guibourg Delamotte (Associate Professor of Political science at the French Institute of Oriental Studies (Inalco)’s Japanese studies department)
  • Satoru Nagao ((Discussant) Research Fellow at the Institute for Future Engineering, Visiting Research Fellow at the Research Institute for Oriental Cultures at Gakushuin University, Research Fellow at the Japan Forum for Strategic Studies, and Lecturer at Aoyama-Gakuin and Komazawa universities)

Is Japan powerful? This is the question which this talk will address and is at the center of a volume to be published by Routledge this fall, edited by Professor Delamotte. In this book, many of Japan’s most prominent security experts discuss various aspects of Japanese power (see table of contents below). Until the end of the 1980s, Japan’s power, its ability to weigh internationally, appeared considerable in the economic and financial spheres. At the same time, its influence in the security arena was deemed so minuscule that the country was seen by many, including Japanese officials, as an economic giant but a diplomat and military dwarf. Though this description…
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