Events

[ICAS Academic Conference] Emergent Forms of Engagement and Activism in Japan: Politics, Cultures and Technologies

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Date:
Time:
13:00 (Doors open at 12:30)
Speakers:
  • Tomiko Yoda (Takashima Professor of Japanese Humanities in the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University)
  • Takuro Higuchi (Independent sociologist of social movements)
  • Patricia Steinhoff (Professor of Sociology at the University of Hawaii )
  • David Slater (Associate Professor of Anthropology at Sophia University)
  • Robin O’Day (PhD candidate in the Department of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia )
  • Shibuya Nozomu (Associate professor of sociology at Chiba University)
  • Daishiro Nomiya (Dean of the Graduate School of Global Studies at Sophia University)
  • Yoshitaka Mōri (Associate professor of sociology and cultural studies at Tokyo University of the Arts)
  • Shin Mizukoshi (professor of media studies, the Interfaculty Initiative in Information Studies at the University of Tokyo)
  • Love Kindstrand (Graduate student in anthropology at Sophia University, Tokyo)
  • Sharon Hayashi (Assistant Professor of Cinema and Media Studies in the Department of Film at York University, Toronto)
  • Ikuo Gonoï (Assistant Professor of Politics and International Relations at Rikkyo University and Visiting esearch Fellow of the Social Science Research Institute (SSRI), International Christian University)
  • Patrick W. Galbraith (Ph.D. in the Graduate School of Interdisciplinary Information Studies at the University of Tokyo)
  • Ann Allison (Robert O. Keohane Professor of Cultural Anthropology, Professor of Women's Studies, Duke University)
Venue:
Azabu Hall, Temple University, Japan Campus
2F
Moderator:
Kyle Cleveland (ICAS Associate Director)
Admissions:
1,000 yen
Language:
English and Japanese
Registration:
If possible, we ask you to register by E-mail (icas@tuj.temple.edu) , but we always welcome participants even you do not register. / 参加登録はなしでも参加できますので、直接会場へお越しください。
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This conference brings together an international, multi-disciplinary group of scholars seeking to document and understand emergent forms of political activism, social engagement and cultural expression, especially among youth in Japan. With roots that go back to the post-war student and citizens movements, popular culture shifts during 1970’s affluence, and post-bubble recessionary disenfranchisement, our goal is to develop a critical language that captures the range of alternatives to what was once considered “political.” From street politics to new forms of socialities, from creative representation to active resistance, our goal is to explore these alternative currents right into our post 3.11 moment.

Organizers:
Kyle Cleveland, Temple University Japan
David H. Slater, Sophia University
Love Kindstrand, Sophia University

Admission: General – ¥1,000 (Sat & Sun inclusive)   Students – Free with student ID

Schedule
Saturday, June 11th:
– Opening Remarks: David H. Slater, Sophia University “Emergent Politics in Japan Today”

1:00pm – 3:00pm: ART, CREATIVITY, REPRESENTATIONS AND SOCIAL MOVEMENTS

– Tomiko Yoda, Japanese Literature and Media Studies, Harvard University
Between Pop and Radical: Feminism and Media Culture in Early 70s Japan
– Sharon Hayashi, Cinema and Media Studies, York University
From Exploitation to Playful Exploits
– Patrick W. Galbraith, Information Studies, University of Tokyo
Train Man, Radiowave Man, Underground Man: Revisiting the Politics of Pleasure after the Akihabara Incident

Discussants: Anne Allison, Duke University and Yoshitaka Mouri, Tokyo University of the Arts

3:30pm – 6:00pm: CURRENTS AND CULTURES OF ACTIVISM 

– Yoshitaka Mouri, Tokyo University of the Arts (Tokyo Geijutsu Daigaku)
Reconsidering Cultural-Political Movements in Japan in the Age of ‘Freeter’
– Higuchi Takuro, Social Movement Studies
A Prehistory of the Alterglobalisation Movement in Japan: Subterranean Autonomous Networks in Japan Since the ‘90s
– Robin O’Day, Cultural Anthropology, University of British Columbia
Union is Hope: The Role of Networks and Digital Media in Organizing Japan’s Young Irregular Workers
– Love Kindstrand, Cultural Anthropology, Sophia University
Tactical Currents, Spatial Framings: the Movement Against Nike-ification of Miyashita Park and Beyond

Discussants: Patricia Steinhoff, University of Hawaii and Daishiro Nomiya, Sophia University

6:00pm: “GLOBAL DAY OF ACTION” DEMONSTRATION

June 11 is a global day of action organized by the Japanese movement against nuclear power. After the final panel on Saturday we will leave together for a gathering held in central Shinjuku. Anyone who is interested in attending is more than welcome to join. More details are available at http://nonukes.jp/

**************************************************************************************
 Sunday, June 12th: 

1:00pm – 4:30pm TRAJECTORIES OF ALTERNATIVE POLITICS 

– Ikuo J. Gonoï, Political Theory, Rikkyo University
The World’s End : The Cognitive Turn from “Sekai” to “Shakai”
– Patricia Steinhoff, Sociology, University of Hawaii
Transforming Invisible Civil Society into Alternative Politics
– Mizukoshi Shin, Media Studies, University of Tokyo
Everyday Sociality and Social Media
– Anne Allison, Cultural Anthropology, Duke University
Stopping Death and Organizing Around Life: a Politics of Survival
– Shibuya Nozomu, Cultural Sociology, Chiba University
Radioactive Contamination and the Common

Discussants: Tomiko Yoda, Harvard University and Sharon Hayashi, York University

5:00pm – 6:00pm: ROUNDTABLE ON 3.11

POST-3.11  FUTURE DIRECTIONS FOR SCHOLARSHIP AND ACTIVISM

Since the Tohoku earthquake on March 11, Japan has seen a renewed sense of national and political crisis, and an intensification of nationalistic narratives. Perhaps more importantly, there has been a reawakened political subjectivity that goes beyond existing anti-capitalist or anti-nuclear alternatives, which suggests a broader and more lasting repoliticization of everyday life. Demonstrations in Tokyo have been some of the largest since the Anpo era, but this is only one aspect of a post-3.11 critique of key institutions at the heart of the Japan, Inc. power structure. In this round-table discussion our presenters will attempt to make sense of the events since 3.11, and explore their implications for our own scholarship.

Chair: Kyle Cleveland, Temple University Japan

6:00pm:  RECEPTION (light food and drinks will be served)
Hosted by TEMPLE UNIVERSITY JAPAN: Wakai Project

Speakers

Tomiko Yoda

Takashima Professor of Japanese Humanities in the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University

Tomiko Yoda is the Takashima Professor of Japanese Humanities in the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University. Her research areas are Japanese literature, media studies, gender studies, and feminist theory.  She is the author of Gender and National Literature: Heian Texts and the Constructions of Japanese Modernity (Duke, 2004) and co-editor with Harry Harootunian of Japan After Japan: Social and Cultural Life from the Recessionary 1990s to the Present (Duke, 2006). Her forthcoming book, “Girl Time: Gender and Transformations of Contemporary Japan,” examines gender construction in post-1960s Japanese consumer culture.

Takuro Higuchi

Independent sociologist of social movements

Higuchi Takuro is an independent sociologist of social movements. He is researching the post-Seattle transformation of social movements in Japan, identifying with a tradition of activist anthropology after the reflexive turn, that maintains a deep engagement in reality. (as of June 2011)

Patricia Steinhoff

Professor of Sociology at the University of Hawaii

Patricia Steinhoff is Professor of Sociology at the University of Hawaii and currents serves as Graduate Chair for the department. She has done extensive research on how Japanese social movements interact with the state, including work on the policing of social movements and how the Japanese criminal justice system treats persons accused of politically motivated offenses. She has recently edited Going to Court to Change Japan: Social Movements and the Law (forthcoming from University of Michigan Japanese Studies Series) and is currently writing a book on Japan’s invisible civil society.

David Slater

Associate Professor of Anthropology at Sophia University

David Slater is Associate Professor of Anthropology at Sophia University. His research focuses on capitalism, youth, labor, semiotics and urban studies. He is the editor of Social Class in Contemporary Japan (co-editor  Hiroshia Ishida). (as of June 2011)

Robin O’Day

PhD candidate in the Department of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia

Robin O’Day is a PhD candidate in the Department of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia and former visiting researcher at Sophia University’s Institute of Comparative Culture (2007-2009).  His current research project is an ethnographic study of Japanese part-time workers in protest.  His study is based on fieldwork with several social movements in Japan that are politically mobilizing around what they perceive as mounting inequality in the workforce.  Theoretically his research project grapples with how irregular employment in Japan is influencing emergent forms of political resistance. (as of June 2011)

Shibuya Nozomu

Associate professor of sociology at Chiba University

Shibuya Nozomu is an associate professor of sociology at Chiba University. He is the author of Tmashii no Rodou (Labor of the Soul: Anatomy of Neoliberal Power), and Midddle Class Matters. He investigates global justice movements with particular emphasis on prefigurative politics. (as of June 2011)

Daishiro Nomiya

Dean of the Graduate School of Global Studies at Sophia University

Daishiro Nomiya is Dean of the Graduate School of Global Studies at Sophia University.  His research focuses on globalization and civil society, cultural anthropology/folklore studies, social movements and comparative historical sociology. (as of June 2011)

Yoshitaka Mōri

Associate professor of sociology and cultural studies at Tokyo University of the Arts

Yoshitaka Mōri is associate professor of sociology and cultural studies at Tokyo University of the Arts. His research interests are postmodern culture, media, art, the city and transnationalism. His publications include a book Storiito no Shiso (The Philosophy in the Streets) and Bunka= Seiji (Culture=Politics). He also published several English essays including, Culture=Politics: The Emergence of New Cultural Forms of Protest in the age of Freeter’ (Inter-Asia Cultural Studies, vol.6 No.1, Routledge, 2005) and Subcultural Unconsciousness in Japan: the War and Japanese Contemporary Artists (Popular Culture, Globalization and Japan, M. Allen and R. Sakamoto eds, Routledge 2006: London). Since 2006, he has worked as one of the directors of NPO, Art Institute Kitakyushu (AIK). (as of June 2011)

Shin Mizukoshi

professor of media studies, the Interfaculty Initiative in Information Studies at the University of Tokyo

Shin Mizukoshi is a professor of media studies, the Interfaculty Initiative in Information Studies at the University of Tokyo, Japan. Mizukoshi advocates “socio-media studies” based on historical and social perspectives, rather than focused on information technologies. His research activities include the MELL Project (Media Expression, Learning and Literacy Project), a practical studies on citizen’s media expression and media literacy, and Media Exprimo: a transdisciplinary research project to develop cultural programs and technological systems to encourage general people’s media expressions and storytellings. He is the author of Formation of Media: A Dynamic History of American Broadcasting, among many other works in Japanese.
(as of June 2011)

Love Kindstrand

Graduate student in anthropology at Sophia University, Tokyo

Love Kindstrand is a Graduate student in anthropology at Sophia University, Tokyo, interested in urban countercultures and radical spaces . Find him on Twitter: @lovekindstrand (as of June 2011)

Sharon Hayashi

Assistant Professor of Cinema and Media Studies in the Department of Film at York University, Toronto

Sharon Hayashi is Assistant Professor of Cinema and Media Studies in the Department of Film at York University, Toronto. Her current research interests include the uses of new media by new social movements and the architecture of cinema. She has published articles on Japanese pink cinema and the travel films of Shimizu Hiroshi, and is currently creating Mapping Protest Tokyo, a historical mapping website that analyzes the new media work of artistic collectives and new social movements in relation to artistic performance and political protest in Japan and globally from 1960 to the present. (as of June, 2011)

Ikuo Gonoï

Assistant Professor of Politics and International Relations at Rikkyo University and Visiting esearch Fellow of the Social Science Research Institute (SSRI), International Christian University

Ikuo Gonoï is Assistant Professor of Politics and International Relations at Rikkyo University and Visiting esearch Fellow of the Social Science Research Institute (SSRI), International Christian University. Between 2004-2010, he was selected as the Research Fellow of Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) and also appointed as Council member of Policy Planning and Research Office, Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, Japan for the past two years. (as of June, 2011)

Patrick W. Galbraith

Ph.D. in the Graduate School of Interdisciplinary Information Studies at the University of Tokyo

Patrick W. Galbraith earned a Ph.D. in the Graduate School of Interdisciplinary Information Studies at the University of Tokyo. Publications include Moe: Exploring Virtual Potential in Post-Millennial Japan (Electronic Journal of Contemporary Japanese Studies), Akihabara: Conditioning a Public ‘Otaku’ Image (Mechademia 5), Maid in Japan: An Ethnographic Account of Alternative Intimacy (Intersections), Lolicon: The Reality of ‘Virtual Child Pornography’ in Japan (Image & Narrative) and Fujoshi: Fantasy Play and Transgressive Intimacy among ‘Rotten Girls’ in Contemporary Japan (Signs).

Ann Allison

Robert O. Keohane Professor of Cultural Anthropology, Professor of Women's Studies, Duke University

Anne Allison is a cultural anthropologist who teaches at Duke University. She is the author of three books: Nightwork: Sexuality, Pleasure, and Corporate Masculinity in a Tokyo Hostess Club, Permitted and Prohibited Desires: Mothers, Censorship, and Comics in Japan, and Millennial Monsters: Japanese Toys and the Global Imagination. Her current research is on precarity, a sense of home, and the (re)emergence of social soul in contemporary Japan. The book she is writing on this is tentatively titled: Soul on Strike in Precarious Japan.