Events

[Joint Symposium] Asian Design: How Asia is developing a unique international order

Date:
Time:
12:30 (Doors open at 12:00)
Panelists:
  • Rumi Aoyama (Professor at the Graduate School of Asia-Pacific Studies at Waseda University)
  • Jin Min Chung (Professor of Political Science at Myongji University in Seoul, Korea)
  • Robert Dujarric (Director, Institute of Contemporary Asian Studies (ICAS) at Temple University, Japan Campus)
  • Brad Glosserman (Senior Advisor for Pacific Forum CSIS and a visiting professor at Tama University’s Center for Rule Making Strategies)
  • Robin Harding (Tokyo Bureau Chief for the Financial Times)
  • Keisuke Iida (Professor at the Graduate Schools for Law and Politics at the University of Tokyo and Department Head of the School of Legal and Political Studies)
  • Ken Moskowitz (Adjunct Professor of Political Science at Temple University, Japan Campus)
  • Gregory Noble (Professor of Politics and Public Administration in the Institute of Social Science at the University of Tokyo)
  • Jun Okumura (Visiting Researcher at the Meiji Institute for Global Affairs (MIGA) and Lecturer at Tokyo Institute of Technology (T-Tech))
  • Saadia Pekkanen (founding Director of the Jackson School Ph.D. Program and Job and Gertrud Tamaki Professor at the University of Washington's Jackson School of International Studies)
Venue:
Azabu Hall, Temple University, Japan Campus
Moderator:
Robert Dujarric (ICAS Director), Saadia Pekkanen (University of Washington)
Admissions:
Free
Language:
English
Registration:
If possible, we ask you to register by E-mail (icas@tuj.temple.edu) , but we always welcome participants even you do not register. / 参加登録はなしでも参加できますので、直接会場へお越しください。
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The University of Washington and Temple University, Japan Campus (TUJ) will organize a joint symposium at TUJ on December 15, 2017. This symposium will look at how the international order in Asia is evolving along new lines which are different from other patterns. We will start with a brown bag lunch presentation and discussion with Saadia Pekkanen on “Asian Design: How Asia is developing a unique international order” (based on her recent edited volume: Asian Design) and continue with two afternoon panels and an evening session.

Program:

12:30-13:30 Lunch presentation: Introducing Asian Design and processes
* Brown bag lunch – please bring your own lunch
Speaker: Saadia Pekkanen (University of Washington)
Moderator: Robert Dujarric (TUJ)

14:00-18:00 Panels: Perspectives on Asian Designs in the World Order

14:00-16:00 Panel 1: Views from Japan, China, Korea, Europe
Panelists: Rumi Aoyama (Waseda University), Jin Min Chung (Myongji University), Robin Harding (Financial Times), and Keisuke Iida (University of Tokyo)
Moderator: Saadia Pekkanen (University of Washington)

16:00-18:00 Panel 2: Views On and From the United States on the World Order
Panelists: Brad Glosserman (Pacific Forum CSIS and Center for Rule Making Strategies, Tama University) and Gregory Noble (University of Tokyo)
Moderator: Robert Dujarric (TUJ)

18:00-19:00 Break
*  Light refreshments and snacks will be served.

19:00-21:00 Evening presentation: How we got to Trump America? Historical perspective on the US and Asia
Speakers: Ken Moskowitz (TUJ) and Jun Okumura (Meiji University)
Moderator: Robert Dujarric (TUJ)

Panelists

Rumi Aoyama

Professor at the Graduate School of Asia-Pacific Studies at Waseda University

Rumi Aoyama is Professor at the Graduate School of Asia-Pacific Studies at Waseda University. She has been a visiting researcher at Stanford University (2005-2006) and George Washington University (2016-2017). She earned her Ph.D. in Law from the Graduate School of Law, Keio University. She specializes in China’s contemporary foreign policy and politics. Her publication Contemporary China’s Foreign Policy (Keio University Press, 2008), was honored with the 24th Masayoshi Ohira Foundation Memorial Prize. Other recent publications include A Diplomatic History of The People’s Republic of China (University of Tokyo Press, 2017); China and the Future of International Order (University of Tokyo Press, 2015); China’s Asia Policy in the Post-cold War Era, (University of Tokyo Press, 2013); China’s Global Strategy (Akashi Press, 2011); China’s Public Diplomacy Strategy (The Japan Foundation, 2009).

Jin Min Chung

Professor of Political Science at Myongji University in Seoul, Korea

Jin Min Chung is Professor of Political Science at Myongji University in Seoul, Korea. He graduated from Seoul National University and received his Ph.D. in Political Science from Syracuse University. His major research interests include comparative political process, political behavior, and party politics. He has published articles in such journals as Western Political Quarterly, Asian Perspective, Journal of East Asian Affairs, Korean Political Science Review, International Studies Review, and Korea Observer.

Robert Dujarric

Director, Institute of Contemporary Asian Studies (ICAS) at Temple University, Japan Campus

Robert Dujarric has been Director, Institute of Contemporary Asian Studies (ICAS) at Temple University, Japan Campus since 2007. His tasks include research, writing, running seminars and lectures on current affairs, the arts, and culture, in Tokyo and New York. His major research interests are Japan, Asian security, and US foreign policy. He is a former Council on Foreign Relations/Hitachi Fellow in Japan at the Research Institute of Economy Trade and Industry (RIETI). He has worked on research in Washington DC, at Goldman Sachs in London, and at First Boston Corp. in New York, Madrid and Tokyo. He is a graduate of Harvard College and holds an MBA from Yale University.

Brad Glosserman

Senior Advisor for Pacific Forum CSIS and a visiting professor at Tama University’s Center for Rule Making Strategies

Brad Glosserman is Senior Advisor for Pacific Forum CSIS and a visiting professor at Tama University’s Center for Rule Making Strategies. He is the author with Scott Snyder of The Japan-South Korea Identity Clash (Columbia University Press, 2015) and he is finalizing a study on the impact of the March 11, 2011, “triple catastrophe” on Japan. He holds a J.D. from George Washington University, an M.A. from Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), and a B.A. from Reed College.

Robin Harding

Tokyo Bureau Chief for the Financial Times

Robin Harding is Tokyo Bureau Chief for the Financial Times, covering the Japanese economy, politics and foreign relations. He was previously based in Washington DC, where he covered all aspects of the US and international economy, from the Federal Reserve to the IMF.
Robin was born in Durham, in the north of England, and has degrees in economics from the University of Cambridge and Hitotsubashi University. Before becoming a journalist he worked in banking, asset management and public policy research.

Keisuke Iida

Professor at the Graduate Schools for Law and Politics at the University of Tokyo and Department Head of the School of Legal and Political Studies

Keisuke Iida is Professor at the Graduate Schools for Law and Politics at the University of Tokyo and Department Head of the School of Legal and Political Studies. His area of specialization is the international political economy. His major publications include Legalization and Japan: The Politics of WTO Dispute Settlement (2006), International Political Economy (in Japanese, 2007), and The Future of Economic Hegemony (in Japanese, 2013), and Japan’s Security and Economic Dependence on China and the United States (2017). He has published numerous articles in international journals such as International Organization, Public Choice, International Studies Quarterly, and the Journal of Conflict Resolution.
He received his Ph.D. in Political Science from Harvard University. He has formerly taught at Princeton University and Aoyama Gakuin University.

Ken Moskowitz

Adjunct Professor of Political Science at Temple University, Japan Campus

Ken Moskowitz is Adjunct Professor of Political Science at Temple University, Japan Campus. His 30-year career as a Foreign Service Officer at the U.S. State Department included public diplomacy assignments in Budapest, Sofia, Kyiv, and Tokyo, where he was the American Center Director. Moskowitz has also studied at SAIS/Johns Hopkins University and taught cultural diplomacy at State’s Foreign Service Institute. He holds a Ph. D. from the Academy of Theatre and Film Arts in Sofia, an M.A. in Philosophy from Brown University, and a B.A. in History and English Literature from Swarthmore College.

Gregory Noble

Professor of Politics and Public Administration in the Institute of Social Science at the University of Tokyo

Gregory W. Noble is Professor of Politics and Public Administration in the Institute of Social Science at the University of Tokyo. Among his publications are Collective Action in East Asia: How Ruling Parties Shape Industrial Policy; The Asian Financial Crisis and the Structure of Global Finance (co-edited with John Ravenhill), “Abenomics in the 2014 Election: Showing the money (supply) and little else,” “Government-business relations in democratizing Asia,” “The decline of particularism in Japanese politics,” “The Chinese Auto Industry as Challenge, Opportunity and Partner.”

Jun Okumura

Visiting Researcher at the Meiji Institute for Global Affairs (MIGA) and Lecturer at Tokyo Institute of Technology (T-Tech)

Jun Okumura is Visiting Researcher at the Meiji Institute for Global Affairs (MIGA) and Lecturer at Tokyo Institute of Technology (T-Tech). He entered the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (then Ministry of International Trade and Industry) upon graduation from the Faculty of Law of the University of Tokyo. During his career at the ministry, he was stationed in Brazil, headed the JETRO office in New York City, and obtained an LLM at Harvard Law School. Along the way, he has been associated with the Manufactured Imports and Investment Promotion Organization (MIPRO), the Eurasia Group and the Tokyo Institute of Technology. He translated Ian Bremmer’s Superpower: Three Choices for America’s Role in the World for Japanese readers. His blog: Global Talk

Saadia Pekkanen

founding Director of the Jackson School Ph.D. Program and Job and Gertrud Tamaki Professor at the University of Washington's Jackson School of International Studies

Saadia M. Pekkanen is founding Director of the Jackson School Ph.D. Program and Job and Gertrud Tamaki Professor at the University of Washington’s Jackson School of International Studies. She works on the international relations of Japan and Asia, with a focus on space governance, law, and policy. She holds a Ph.D from Harvard University in Political Science, as well as Master’s degrees from Columbia University and Yale Law School. She has published a half-dozen books and most recently co-edited the Oxford Handbook of the International Relations of Asia (Oxford University Press 2014), and edited Asian Designs: Governance in the Contemporary World Order (Cornell University Press 2016). She is now working on a new book called The Age of Newspace. She serves as Co-Chair of the U.S. Japan Space Forum, and directs both the Space Security Initiative (SSI) and the project on Emerging Frontiers in Newspace. She is also a contributor for Forbes on the space industry.