Summer 2011 Topical Courses

Last update: April 19, 2011

As St 2000 (812) Manga in Japanese Popular Culture (Summer Institute)

The rich and varied world of Japanese manga and anime represent some of the most important cultural products to appear in Japan in the post war period, and an increasingly important part of global popular culture. This course offers a thematic study of manga as Japanese pop cultural texts, adopting an interdisciplinary approach, drawing from the fields of history, art history, anthropology, sociology, and literature and film. Each class a new issue from within the history of manga will be examined to give a valuable insight into key aspects of Japanese culture.

As St 3000 (813) Anime in Japanese Popular Culture (Summer Institute)

Japanese anime represent some of the most important cultural products to appear in Japan in the post war period, and an increasingly important part of global popular culture. This course offers a thematic study of anime, adopting an interdisciplinary approach, drawing from the fields of history, art history, anthropology, sociology, and literature and film. Each week a new issue will be examined to give a valuable insight into key aspects of Japanese culture, including the transformation of gender roles and powerful girl super hero anime such as Sailor Moon; the birth of the otaku subculture; apocalyptic visions of the future in science fiction anime such as Akira, and Ghost in the Shell.

FMA 3770 (811) Contemporary Japanese Film

Japanese film has been one of the most important national cinemas in the world and many Japanese films have been seen outside of Japan. This course will focus on the contemporary Japanese films made during the last 15 years from various genres, e.g., family drama, horror, literature adaptations, anime, documentaries and TV commercials. The directors to be covered will include Kiyoshi Kurosawa, Hideo Nakata, Norio Tsuruta, Shinobu Yaguchi, Yojiro Takita, Jun Ichikawa, Hirokazu Kore-eda, Yoji Yamada, Satoshi Kon, Naoko Ogigami, Tatsuya Mori and Kazuhiro Soda. We will examine how the directors, both young and old generations, portray the social and cultural problems, and how they develop his/her aesthetics in cinematic expression.

Japanese 3000 (811) Japanese Communication and Culture I

This course focuses on Pragmatics (the use of language in the real world). The course attempts to raise students' awareness/consciousness about the fact that pragmatic rules of other languages are not always the same as those of their own, providing students with knowledge about how pragmatics rules operate in the Japanese speaking community and drawing their attention to mismatches and inconsistencies in behavior. The course deals with a variety of speech acts (e.g., greeting-parting, apologizing, requesting, refusing, accepting, complaining, negotiating, and complimenting), business discourse, paralinguistic features (e.g., gesture, facial expressions, distance, eye-contact), features of conversation (e.g., back channel cues, topic-change, turn-taking), Japanese culture including social distance and dominance, honorific expressions, pragmalinguistic failure and sociopragmatic failure.

Japanese 3000 (812) Introduction to Consecutive Interpreting for Non-Native Speakers of Japanese I

This introductory interpreting course is designed for advanced learners of Japanese whose language proficiency level falls somewhere between JLPT N2 and N1 or equivalent. Students will be provided with in-class interpreting exercises to learn how to interpret to English from Japanese, and vice versa.

Japanese 4182 (811) Oral Skills for Native Speakers of Japanese

This course provides native speakers of Japanese with an opportunity to improve their reading, communication strategies and skills in a variety of topics and situations consisting of different degrees of formality. The use of honorific expressions will be reviewed in meaningful and appropriate contexts as well. Moreover, the course will deal with a variety of speech acts (e.g., apologizing, requesting, refusing, accepting, complaining, negotiating, and complimenting) in different situations, discussion and debate based on the reading materials (current issues in international business), oral presentations, public speeches at different types of ceremonies, meetings, parties, and interviews.

Pol Sci 4896 (811) The Democracy Dilemma: Transition to Democracy (and Back Again) in Comparative Perspective

Between 1974 and 1990, at least 30 countries began transitioning to democracy, doubling the number of democratic governments in the world. As the Cold War ended and Communism collapsed in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, many politicians, and even some scholars, proclaimed that Western-style democracy had 'won'. It was, in the words of Fukuyama, the 'end of history'. But 20 years later, while some countries have moved along the path to democracy, many others have got stuck along the way. Why do some countries make the transition to democracy while others backslide into authoritarian forms of rule? What internal and external factors promote or inhibit democratic consolidation? Can democracy be imposed from outside? In seeking to answer these questions, this course examines the key elements of three historic 'waves' of democratisation. Students will analyse the interaction of variables such as political culture, civil society, political institutions, civil-military relations, ethnicity and nationalism, and the international environment as determinants of democratisation. Case studies will draw on examples from Latin America, the Middle East, East Asia, the former Soviet Union and Southern and Eastern Europe. The course will conclude with analysis of the future prospects and challenges for democracy and democratization in countries around the world.

Psych 3620 (812) Topics in Psychology: TBA

To be announced.

Tyler 3349 (811) TUJ Summer Workshop

Advanced level interdisciplinary art course that integrates theory and application through a series of guest lectures, research trips, critiques and studio work. Students will explore new technical methods while refining areas of their expertise. This course offers an opportunity to engage in discussion and critiques with students from different art disciplines.

As St 2000 (813) / Jour 3701 (811) International Journalism and World Perceptions

A survey of how the international press covers contemporary political and social issues in today's media.

As St 3000 (812) / Anthro 3310 (811) Japanese Popular Culture (Summer Institute)

This seminar examines contemporary popular culture, highlighting the representations and performative aspects of everyday lives in contemporary Japan. The course looks at the global attraction of Japanese popular culture as well as how Western popular culture is 'localized' focusing in particular on manga, anime, fashion, music, TV, and sports. We will also critically consider the impact of mass media (music, film, TV, cybercultures, and innovative modes of communication (cell phones etc) on youth globally as well as on Japanese society. Visual representations of Japanese society and its emerging cultural diversity will also be examined in relation to written representations and everyday reality. All these topics will be examined from the perspectives of gender, historical context, as well as symbolic meanings given to respective representations and practices, and students will be encouraged to reflect on their everyday experiences in Tokyo and to gain anaytical perspectives into their experiences throughout the course. Through qualitative research projects (on the topic chosen by the student) the course will allow students experiential opportunities to understand Japanese youth culture on its own terms. Taking advantage of TUJ's central-Tokyo location and association with popular culture networks in art, media and design, the course will include ethnographic site visits and lectures by noted authorities on Japanese popular culture.

Hist 4696 (811) / As St 4096 (811) The Japanese Occupation of Southeast Asia

A focus on Japan's occupation of Southeast Asia between 1942 and 1945 and related topics. Designed primarily for history majors, this course emphasizes research and writing skills. Seminar presentations and a research paper are required.

NMIC 4040 (811) / FMA 4240 (811) Tokyo Stories

The program utilizes New Media technology and Locative Media approaches. The class originated at Temple University Japan, and is part of the New Media Interdisciplinary Concentration major. The goal of the course is to introduce students to the concept of locative media by researching and creating a set of connected annotations about a specific neighborhood of the city. Students will use methods of cultural and visual anthropology to document facets of these neighborhoods with text, pictures and recordings. These place-based annotations will be connected and archived using a variety of digital technologies (primarily the web and mobile telephones). Students will view examples of current "best practices" in locative media, and create group projects that will add to a Temple map archive of urban narratives. Students will create their own narratives from sets of "connected annotations" that define a path through the city.

Pol Sci 4320 (811) / As St 3000 (811) Democracy and Capitalism in East Asia

The purpose of this seminar is to bring together a group of students twice a week to discuss the changing politics and economics of selected Asian countries using the concepts of democracy, capitalism and the rule of law. Student should be able to apply these concepts to explaining the variations in institutions and policies of Japan, China, Taiwan, South Korea and North Korea. Students will be expected to keep up with readings for every class, give oral presentations, and participate in discussions of the materials.

Soc 2130 (811) / As St 2000 (811) Youth and Deviant Subcultures in Japan (Summer Institute)

This seminar addresses the convergence of youth and popular culture, highlighting the performative aspects of youth subcultures in contemporary Japanese society. The course will examine how youth and popular culture are situated in relation to mainstream institutions, and discuss how alternative modes of cultural interaction develop alongside and in opposition to the defining cultural values of mainstream society. The course will look at the intensive communities of on-line cybculture and digital media networks, racial and political representation in Japanese Hip Hop and Punk music, the style subcultures of Goth[Lolita], Cos-play and their subcultural networks, and examine how youth culture embodies and creates new forms of cultural innovation in these various realms. In addition to examining the frontiers of evolving youth culture, the course will contextualize these novel subcultures by examining how Japanese society polices illicit behavior, by examining issues such as the Yakuza's role in society, sexuality, drug use and juvenile delinquency in the context of contemporary social change. We will also examine how counter-cultural priorities are being articulated through emerging media and transglobal networks, leading to novel forms of mediated identities and practices that defy institutional control. Through qualitative collaborative research projects, the course will allow students experiential opportunities to understand Japanese youth culture on its own terms. Taking advantage of TUJ's central-Tokyo location and association with popular culture networks in art, media and design, the course will include ethnographic site visits, and lectures by noted authorities on Japanese popular culture.

Wom St 3542 (811) / Psych 3620 (811) / As St 3542 (811) Women and Society in Japan

In this course we will examine the reciprocal relationship between societal expectations and women's responses to social, cultural, and political changes in Japanese society. We will analyze how socio-cultural and political changes shape women's roles in society and explore the roles of women in terms of motherhood, family, and work. We will also examine the situation of women from minority groups such as Buraku, Ainu, Zainichi, and foreign women in Japan, and explore why their voices are silenced in contemporary Japanese society. The course will also explore contemporary gender-related social issues, such as reproductive health and the rights of women, prostitution, trafficking in persons, and domestic violence.