Course Descriptions (Tokyo)

To register for any of the courses below, follow the procedures described in Course Registration. If you already know the process, go to the Registration Form.

Important Notice about Textbooks

To purchase textbooks, click Amazon link below next to each textbook title. In order to get your textbooks in time for the start of the semester, please order them as soon as you register for courses. Make sure to order through the provided Amazon links in this page.

Summer Semester 2018 Session I

FLED 5470:

Introduction to the Study of TESOL

Professor:
Dr. Tomoko Nemoto
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 10 - August 9
Day & Time:
Thursday, 18:00 - 21:00

Beginning students of TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) usually have two purposes: (1) to learn the academic skills they need to succeed at graduate work and (2) to discover the best ways to teach English to non-native speakers. In this course, students will achieve the first purpose, mastering necessary academic skills, while getting a head start on the second, understanding methods and issues of TESOL study. Academic skills include getting the most out of lectures and research articles, taking notes, accessing library and Internet resources, answering essay test questions, giving presentations, and writing papers using proper forms of citation, paraphrasing, and bibliographic references.

This course is designed for students who are new to the Master of Science in Education program, who have little or no experience studying in an English-language university, or who are not familiar with formal academic writing style (APA style). For such students, this course is recommended as the first course in the M.S.Ed. Curriculum. Registrants who are not native speakers of English should have a TOEFL score of at least 550 on the paper-based test or 80 on the Internet-based test.

All the students will be required to attend one of the three Distinguished Lecturer Weekend Seminars (only the first three hours of the Saturday session) scheduled in summer. The professor will provide you with further details about the seminar requirement later in the classroom.

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Lightbown, P. M., & Spada, N. (2013). How languages are learned (Oxford handbooks for language teachers) (4th ed.). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. ( Buy on Amazon.co.jp )
  • American Psychological Association. (2009). Publication manual of the American psychological association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. ( Buy on Amazon.co.jp )

Recommended Textbook:

  • Richards, J. C., & Schmidt, R. W. (2010). Longman dictionary of language teaching and applied linguistics (4th ed.). Oxon, UK: Routledge. ( Buy on Amazon.co.jp )

TESL 5612:

Applied Language Study II

Professor:
Dr. Tomoko Nemoto
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 7 - June 20
Day & Time:
Monday and Wednesday, 18:00 - 21:00

The last seventy years have seen a double revolution in linguistic theory: first the triumph of structural linguistics over traditional grammar, then the ascendancy of generative-transformational analysis over structural linguistics. Today, textbooks and teaching materials based on structural linguistic theories and G-T theories are regularly published, even as traditional grammar continues to exert a strong influence on EFL methods and materials.

This course will explore in some detail the theories and practices of traditional grammar, structural linguistics, and generative-transformational analysis. From that technical base, we will study the ways in which each theory influences textbook authors and teaching materials and how EFL and ESL teachers can decide which grammatical theory best explains the way the English language works and which approach offers the best techniques for classroom instruction. We will also consider current notions of case grammar, functional grammar, cognitive linguistics, connectionism, Universal Grammar, and Chomsky’s government and binding and minimalist theories.

Course participants should expect to do regular reading assignments, weekly homework in grammatical analysis, take a final examination, and complete a course project, which involves conducting a small-scale study in which a particular grammar point is taught to one or more students over a period of several weeks.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Larsen-Freeman, D., & Celce-Murcia, M. (2015). Grammar book: Form, meaning, and use for English language teachers (3rd ed.). Boston, MA: Heinle Cengage Learning. ( Buy on Amazon.co.jp )

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2009). Publication manual of the American psychological association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. ( Buy on Amazon.co.jp )

A set of readings will be available on Canvas.

TESL 5614:

TESOL Approaches to Teaching English

Professor:
Dr. Robert Nelson
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 8 - June 21
Day & Time:
Tuesday and Thursday, 18:00 - 21:00

This course will explore, with breadth and depth, the state of the art in second language teaching pedagogy. The issues covered will be: the history of the field; theories of language learning and the principles connecting these theories to effective classroom practice (e.g., input, output, form-focused instruction, content- and task-based instruction); teaching the 4 skills, motivation, strategies-based instruction, assessment, form vs. function focused teaching, the role of the first language, and the evaluation of methods and materials. Other critical issues include the roles that culture and personality play in learning/teaching, assessment, and syllabus/curriculum writing. These issues will be covered by reading current articles from the ESL/EFL literature, as well as the textbooks. Students will produce lesson plans, a course syllabus, and a teaching philosophy. Active participation in discussion and frequent short papers are required. By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Express and defend the strategies, methods, and activities s/he wants to use as a teacher.
  2. Describe the role(s) of the teacher in language learning.
  3. Understand and appropriately employ the technical terminology of the field.
  4. Discuss and write about the methods and the major issues that presently define second/foreign language teaching.
  5. Design effective lesson plans and syllabi suited to multiple pedagogical contexts.
  6. Apply theoretical principles to classroom practice.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Brown, H. D., & Lee, H. (2015). Teaching by principles: An interactive approach to language pedagogy (4th ed.). White Plains, NY: Pearson Education. ( Buy on Amazon.co.jp )
  • Dörnyei, Z. (2001). Motivational strategies in the language classroom. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. ( Buy on Amazon.co.jp )

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association (2009). Concise rules of APA style (Concise rules of the American psychological association (APA) style) (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. ( Buy on Amazon.co.jp )

ENES 8645:

Adapting and Developing Language Teaching Materials

Professor:
Dr. David Beglar
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 11 - June 23
Day & Time:
Friday 18:00 - 21:00 and Saturday 14:00 - 17:00

High quality language teaching materials are a critical component of any language teaching program. Although textbooks published by major publishers have undergone noticeable improvements in the past four decades, the fact remains that commercially produced materials are designed to be used with a wide variety of learners who often reside in different countries and speak different native languages. For this reason, many instructors find it difficult to find texts that are appropriate for their specific teaching situations. The purpose of this course is to allow students to (a) explore the options available in terms of commercially produced texts, (b) learn to analyze the strengths and weaknesses of those texts in the light of research on successful second language acquisition, and (c) plan and produce original materials in an area of their choice (e.g., listening, speaking, reading, or writing). Topics covered in the course include (a) selecting principles for evaluating and producing pedagogical materials, (b) specifying goals and objectives at the levels of curriculum and task, and (c) enhancing affective factors such as motivation and confidence.

Course participants will be required to actively participate in weekly class discussions, lead some of those discussions, and produce a final course project of an adapted or completely original teaching unit and a description of the theoretical and/or researched-based underpinnings of those materials. Course participants should read Chapters 1-5 in the textbook before the first class session.

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees.

Required Textbook:

  • Wiggins, G., & McTighe, J. (2006). Understanding by design (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, N. J.: Pearson Education, Inc. ( Buy on Amazon.co.jp )
  • Wiggins, G., & McTighe, J. (2011). The understanding by design guide to creating high-quality unit. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. ( Buy on Amazon.co.jp )

EPSY 8625:

Introduction to Research Methodology

Professor:
Dr. James Sick
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 7- June 20
Day & Time:
Monday and Wednesday, 18:00 - 21:00

This course will present a broad overview of research methods and protocols currently used in applied linguistics and educational psychology. The primary goals of the course are to assist teachers in becoming better informed consumers of research and to establish a foundation for actively conducting research in the future.

By the end of the course, students will attain a general understanding of the roles of quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods research protocols currently employed in applied linguistics research. In addition to the textbook, students will critically read example research articles in order to gain familiarity with the presentation of research results and to evaluate the validity and appropriateness of the methods employed. Topics to be covered include the purposes, strengths, and limitations of different research designs, ethical standards when conducting research with human subjects, data collection methods, coding and interpretation of qualitative data, reliability and validity of quantitative data, assumptions underlying statistical analyses, and basic principles of sampling and probability. Assessment will be based on weekly online quizzes and two short written projects.

Quantitative analysis techniques such as descriptive statistics, correlation, t-tests, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and factor analysis will be introduced and practiced using the free JASP software package and supplied data sets. Students should have a laptop computer, either Mac or Windows, to bring to class on days when we do data analysis.

This course can be used as elective credits for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees.

Required Textbook:

  • Paltridge, B., & Phakiti, A. (2015). Research methods in applied linguistics: A practical resource (Research methods in linguistics) (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Bloomsbury USA Academic. ( Buy on Amazon.co.jp )

Recommended Textbook:

  • Brown, J. D. (2016). Statistics corner: Questions and answers about language testing statistics. North Charleston, SC: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform. ( Buy on Amazon.co.jp )

Summer Semester 2018 Session II

FLED 5470:

Introduction to the Study of TESOL

Professor:
Dr. Tomoko Nemoto
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 10 - August 9
Day & Time:
Thursday, 18:00 - 21:00

Continued from Summer Session I.

TESL 5611:

Applied Language Study I

Professor:
Dr. Noёl Houck
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
June 25 - August 8
Day & Time:
Monday and Wednesday, 18:00 - 21:00

This is an introduction to English phonetics and phonology, with an emphasis on American English pronunciation and related areas of interest to language teachers. The course objectives are: 1) to introduce the basic concepts of phonetics and phonology; 2) to provide practice in transcribing and analyzing the sound systems of native speakers and learners of English; 3) to examine theoretical and practical aspects of the teaching of pronunciation, with a focus on Japanese learners of English. Emphasis will be on consonant and vowel articulation, stress, rhythm, contextual alterations and intonation. Students will also become familiar with theories of acquisition of sounds and their practical realization in the speech of non-native speakers.

Requirements: Students will complete a number of weekly assignments, a final examination, a project in which students will design a series of pronunciation teaching activities to aid non-native speakers in acquiring the pronunciation of English, and a 10-minute course project presentation.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Avery. P., & Ehrlich. S. (1992). Teaching American English pronunciation. Oxford: Oxford University Press ( Buy on Amazon.co.jp )

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association (2009). Concise rules of APA style (Concise rules of the American psychological association (APA) style) (6 th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. ( Buy on Amazon.co.jp )

TESL 5616:

Teaching Second and Foreign Language Skills

Professor:
Dr. Noёl Houck
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
June 26 - August 9
Day & Time:
Tuesday and Thursday, 18:00 - 21:00

This course surveys the theories and practices currently employed in teaching the four language skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) and two linguistic competencies (vocabulary and grammar), with a focus on teaching listening and speaking. The course aims to familiarize students with the implication of theories of language acquisition and the effects on organization of a syllabus and selection of materials and classroom practices. The course will involve discussion of theoretical issues (how language users acquire proficiency in a particular skill), as well as practical concerns (e.g., the development of materials and activities, and assessment of learner progress).

Course requirements include course readings, weekly assignments, regular quizzes, a mid-term and a final examination, and a short project.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

There is no single textbook for this course. An additional set of readings will be available at the beginning of the semester.

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2009). Concise rules of APA style (Concise rules of the American psychological association (APA) style) (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. ( Buy on Amazon.co.jp )

The professor will be using several readings (3-6) from the following book:

  • Celce-Murcia, M., Brinton, D.M., Marguerite, A. S., & Bohlke, D. (2014). Teaching English as a second or foreign language (4th ed.). Boston, MA: Cengage Learning. ( Buy on Amazon.co.jp )

EDUC 5254:

Technology in Education in the 21st Century

Professor:
Dr. James Elwood
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
June 26 - August 9
Day & Time:
Tuesday and Thursday, 18:00 - 21:00

This course will provide a wide-reaching background in the use of technology in language education. Students will be exposed to a potpourri of topics, including (but not limited to) theoretical underpinnings of technology usage, applications both known and obscure, linguistic aspects of technology usage, and research and pedagogical trends in the tech-ed world. Time will also be devoted to roles that technology can play as an aid to and object of research. This course will also feature a substantial dose of practical instruction in such areas as manipulating common software, utilizing keyboard shortcuts, expanding into the cloud, and facilitating classroom instruction. During class, students will lead group discussions, introduce an element from the cybersphere in an oral presentation, and take occasional in-class quizzes. Outside of class, students will compile a virtual reaction journal and write a course paper in which they delve into a self-selected aspect of technology relevant to education.

This course can be used as elective credits for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees.

Required Textbook:

There is no textbook requirement for this course.

ENES 8654:

Teaching and Learning Vocabulary

Professor:
Dr. David Beglar
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
June 29 - August 11
Day & Time:
Friday 18:00 - 21:00 and Saturday 14:00 - 17:00

This course has been cancelled.

The course is focused on teaching, learning, and researching vocabulary – single words and multi-word units – in a second language. In this course, we will look at a wide range of vocabulary research topics, such as what is involved in knowing a word; how much vocabulary is needed when using the four major skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing; acquiring and using specialized vocabulary; learning words from context; using dictionaries effectively, and; learning multi-word units. The course has two primary aims. The first aim is for participants to become more familiar with the wide variety of research that makes up the field of second language vocabulary acquisition. The second aim, which rests on the foundation provided by the first aim, is to develop the knowledge and skills necessary to create an effective plan for teaching vocabulary in a course or in a foreign-language curriculum.

Course participants will be read extensively, complete in-class tasks regarding vocabulary teaching and learning, participate in small group discussions, lead some of those discussions, write two course papers, and make an in-class presentation about the course project. By the end of the course, course participants should be aware of the major issues pertinent to teaching, learning, and researching second-language vocabulary, be able to design a vocabulary component for a language course, advise teachers and learners on vocabulary learning strategies, and design a research project focusing on some aspect of second-language vocabulary learning or teaching. Course participants should read the first four chapters in both textbooks before the first class meeting.

This course can be used as elective credits for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees.

Required Textbook:

  • Nation, I.S.P. (2013). Learning vocabulary in another language (2nd ed.). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. ( Buy on Amazon.co.jp )
  • Nation, I.S.P. (2008). Teaching vocabulary – strategies and techniques. Boston, MA: Heinle ELT. ( Buy on Amazon.co.jp )

TESOL Special Projects - Distinguished Lecturer Series

This Lecturer Series will consist of three weekend seminars. Each seminar course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ed.D/Ph.D. degrees. The first three hours of each seminar (Saturday, 14:00 to 17:00) are free and open to the public. Weekend seminars are free for Master's and doctoral graduates of Temple University Japan Campus for auditing; the fee for other weekend auditors is ¥13,000.

ENES 8655: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 1):

Task-based Language Teaching and Learning

Professor:
Dr. Andrea Révész (University College London, U.K.)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, June 16, 14:00 - 21:00
 
Sunday, June 17, 10:00 - 17:00

Task-based language teaching (TBLT) is an increasingly popular approach to second and foreign language education across the globe. Based on insights from the fields of general education, second language (L2) acquisition research and L2 pedagogy, TBLT uses communicative tasks as the defining unit for L2 curriculum and syllabus design. In this seminar, we will first discuss theoretical, empirical and practical rationales for task-based language learning and teaching. Then, we will review some key steps involved in the development of task-based curricula, from carrying out a task-based needs analysis to deriving and sequencing pedagogic tasks, implementing task-based syllabuses and assessing student performance. Throughout the course, we will draw on recent research on TBLT, and consider how TBLT principles can be applied in various educational contexts.

ENES 8656: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 2):

Teaching and Learning Vocabulary

Professor:
Prof. Paul Nation (Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, June 30, 14:00 - 21:00
 
Sunday, July 1, 10:00 - 17:00

This course looks at the role played by direct learning and meaning focused activities in the teaching and learning of vocabulary. It examines the statistical nature of vocabulary and research-based principles of vocabulary learning in order to help teachers plan the vocabulary learning component of language courses.

By the end of the course, course members should be able to discuss some of the important current issues in teaching and learning vocabulary, describe important areas for research in vocabulary, comment critically on research and practice, design the vocabulary component of a language course, and advise teachers and learners on vocabulary learning.

Required Textbook:

  • Webb, S. & Nation, I.S.P. (2017). How vocabulary is learned. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ( Buy on Amazon.co.jp )

Recommended Textbook:

For additional reading, the following text provides a clear and easily accessible overview of foreign language teaching methodology.

  • Nation, I.S.P. (2013). What should every EFL teacher know? Seoul: Compass Publishing. ( Buy on Amazon.co.jp )

Both books above are available on an e-book or in hard copy through Amazon.

ENES 8657: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 3):

Lexical Input Processing, the TOPRA Model, and Effective Vocabulary Instruction

Professor:
Dr. Joe Barcroft (Washington University in St. Louis, U.S.A.)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, July 14, 14:00 - 21:00
 
Sunday, July 15, 10:00 - 17:00

This seminar focuses on (a) lexical input processing (lex-IP), referring to how learners allocate their limited processing resources when they are exposed to novel vocabulary; (b) the type of processing – resource allocation (TOPRA) model and its predictions for how different types of tasks and input manipulations affect vocabulary learning; and (c) implications of research on lex IP and TOPRA when it comes to vocabulary instruction. The seminar reviews studies on a range of tasks, including writing target words in sentences, copying target words, and attempting to retrieve target words, as well as studies on different ways of structuring input, such as by increasing repetition of target words or increasing the amount of acoustic variability used when presenting target words in spoken input. The findings of these studies have practical implications that have been incorporated in the effective input-based incremental (IBI) approach to vocabulary instruction, which is the focus of the final portion of the seminar. Students in the seminar complete projects that include original IBI lessons along with commentary on how theory and research inform instructional practice in this area.

Doctoral Courses

EDUC 9998:

Dissertation Proposal Writing

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1 - 3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

This course is for those Ph.D. students who have passed the Qualifying Examination and working on their dissertation proposal.

The Ph.D. students are required to take Culminating Courses (6 semester hours overall, minimum 2 semester hours of ED 9999). Culminating Courses: Qualifying Exam Preparation Course (ED9994), Proposal Writing Course (ED9998) and Dissertation Writing Course (ED9999).

EDUC 9999:

Dissertation Writing

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1 - 3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

Six credit hours of Education 9999 are required for Ed.D./Ph.D. degrees.

Students wishing to register for this course should obtain permission from the professor and complete the registration process during the registration period.

EDUC 9282:

Research Apprenticeship

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

Ph.D Students are required to take two 3-credit Research Apprenticeship courses.

If you wish to take an apprenticeship course, you first need to write a 300-400-word abstract of your proposed project (unless you are assisting a professor with one of his or her studies). This abstract should include basic information such as (a) the gaps in the literature you are addressing, (b) the purpose(s) of the study, (c) specific research questions, and (d) your methodology, including information about the participants, instruments, procedures, and the analyses you will perform. You will then need to send the abstract to the advisor you wish to work with (Consult the list of Apprenticeship advisors on the registration form to see who is available), and if the advisor approves your plan, you can then register for the course with that advisor.

For Ph.D. 2017 students only

Students in the Ph.D. program are required to take the doctoral seminars listed below.

EPSY 8826:

Intermediate Educational Statistics

Professor:
Dr. Steven Ross
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 18 - August 11
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00 - 21:00
Saturday, 14:00 - 17:00

For more details about the schedule, please check the schedule chart below.

The intermediate statistics course will build from the foundations laid in the introductory statistics course. The course will review the fundamentals of research design with an emphasis on designs that optimize internal and external validity. Students will review common designs used in applied linguistics research, with a particular focus on sampling, randomization, and intervening variables, as well as how statistical controls are built into designs. The intermediate course will in particular aim to build and expand students' expertise in using SPSS and JASP by extending their repertoire of quantitative analysis techniques including multiple linear regression, analysis of residuals, binary and multinomial logistic regression, discriminant function analysis, univariate and multivariate analysis of variance models, analysis of covariance, factorial repeated measures, multivariate analysis of variance models, and time series regression models. We will also explore Bayesian inference using the freeware JASP. This course will establish a springboard from which participants can extend into more advanced research methods such as event history analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, multilevel and mixed effects models, structural equation modeling, and growth curve modeling. Selected exemplars from the research literature as well as a core text will be utilized.

* SPSS Grad Pack and JASP (free) are required for this course.

This course is required for the Ph.D. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Field, A. (2009). Discovering statistics using SPSS (3rd ed.). London, UK: SAGE Publications. Ltd. ( Buy on Amazon.co.jp )

Dr. Ross's Class Schedule

Session Day Date Class Time Note
1 Friday May 18, 2018 18:00 - 21:00  
2 Saturday May 19, 2018 14:00 - 17:00  
3 Friday June 1, 2018 18:00 - 21:00  
4 Saturday June 2, 2018 14:00 - 17:00  
5 Friday June 15, 2018 18:00 - 21:00  
6 Saturday June 16, 2018 14:00 - 17:00  
7 Friday June 29, 2018 18:00 - 21:00  
8 Saturday June 30, 2018 14:00 - 17:00  
9 Friday July 13, 2018 18:00 - 21:00  
10 Saturday July 14, 2018 14:00 - 17:00  
11 Friday July 27, 2018 18:00 - 21:00  
12 Saturday July 28, 2018 14:00 - 17:00  
13 Friday August 10, 2018 18:00 - 21:00  
14 Saturday August 11, 2018 14:00 - 17:00  

TESL 8626:

Researching Reading and Writing

Professor:
Dr. Robert Nelson
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 11 - August 4
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00 - 21:00
Saturday, 14:00 - 18:00

For more details about the schedule, please check the schedule chart below.

This course offers an overview of the underlying concepts and skills needed for research in ESL and EFL literacy development. Students will acquire fluency in the current best practices for the research in reading and writing in English as a Foreign/Second/Other Language as well as learner text/corpus linguistics in general. In addition to surveying current research methods, students will also become familiar with the theory behind the various current methods for planning, implementing, and assessing reading and writing instruction for all levels of ESL/EFL students, from pre-literacy to academic skills. This class will rely primarily on the academic literature to ensure the timeliness of the methods discussed. The overarching goal of the class is for students to acquire a familiarity with research methods sufficient to enable them to make novel contributions; however, we will review some current issues in pedagogy, focusing on those that are in need of greater empirical support (e.g., the written corrective feedback debate). Specific topics will include reading comprehension, vocabulary development, the psycholinguistics of reading, the nature of academic literacy, the writing process, the effectiveness of written feedback, the social and institutional contexts of ESL/EFL reading and writing and reading and writing assessment. We will also focus on practical techniques in corpus and text linguistics, which will require the student to gain some facility with the R language and the R studio development environment. Assignments will include research proposals complete with thorough design, compilation and analysis of learner corpus data, and various R projects.

This course is required for the Ph.D. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Chen, X., Dronjic, V., & Helms-Park, R (2016). Reading in a second language: Cognitive and psycholinguistic issues. New York, NY: Routledge. ( Buy on Amazon.co.jp )
  • Han, Z., & Anderson, N. J (2009). Second language reading research and instruction: Crossing the boundaries. Ann Arber, MI: University of Michigan Press ( Buy on Amazon.co.jp )
  • Matsuda, P. K., & Silva, T. (2011). Second language writing research: Perspectives on the process of knowledge construction. New York, NY: Routledge. ( Buy on Amazon.co.jp )
    E-book (2014) is also available for the above title ( Buy on Amazon.co.jp ).
  • Gries, S. T. (2009). Quantitative corpus linguistics with R: A practical introduction. New York, NY: Routledge. ( Buy on Amazon.co.jp )

Dr. Nelson's Class Schedule

Session Day Date Class Time Note
1 Friday May 11, 2018 18:00 - 21:00  
2 Saturday May 12, 2018 14:00 - 17:00  
3 Friday May 25, 2018 18:00 - 21:00  
4 Saturday May 26, 2018 14:00 - 17:00  
5 Friday June 8, 2018 18:00 - 21:00  
6 Saturday June 9, 2018 14:00 - 17:00  
7 Friday June 22, 2018 18:00 - 21:00  
8 Saturday June 23, 2018 14:00 - 17:00  
9 Friday July 6, 2018 18:00 - 21:00  
10 Saturday July 7, 2018 14:00 - 17:00  
11 Friday July 20, 2018 18:00 - 21:00  
12 Saturday July 21, 2018 14:00 - 17:00  
13 Friday August 3, 2018 18:00 - 21:00  
14 Saturday August 4, 2018 14:00 - 18:00