Course Descriptions (Tokyo)

To register for any of the courses below, follow the procedures described in Course Registration. If you already know the process, go to the Registration Form.

Important Notice about Textbooks

To purchase textbooks, click Amazon link below next to each textbook title. In order to get your textbooks in time for the start of the semester, please order them as soon as you register for courses. Make sure to order through the provided Amazon links in this page.

Fall Semester 2017

FLED 5470:

Introduction to the Study of TESOL

Professor:
Dr. Ron Martin
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
September 6 - December 16
Day & Time:
Wednesday, 18:00 - 21:00

In lieu of Session 2 (September13), students are required to attend one of the fall weekend seminars instead. The professor will have students write a homework assignment about it.

Beginning students of TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) usually have two purposes: (1) to learn the academic skills they need to succeed at graduate work and (2) to discover the best ways to teach English to non-native speakers. In this course, students will achieve the first purpose, mastering necessary academic skills, while getting a head start on the second, understanding methods and issues of TESOL study. Academic skills include getting the most out of lectures and research articles, taking notes, accessing library and internet resources, answering essay test questions, giving presentations, and writing papers using proper forms of citation, paraphrasing and bibliographic references.

This course is designed for students who are new to the Master of Science in Education program, who have little or no experience studying in an English-language university, or who are not familiar with formal academic writing style (APA style). For such students, this course is recommended as the first course in the M.S.Ed. curriculum. Registrants who are not native speakers of English should have a TOEFL score of at least 550 on the paper-based test or 80 on the internet-based test.

There will be 13 regular class sessions for this course and in addition to the regular class sessions, all the students will be required to attend any one of the three Distinguished Lecturer Weekend Seminars (only the first three hours of the Saturday session) scheduled in fall. The professor will provide you with further details about the seminar requirement later in the classroom.

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Lightbown, P. M., & Spada, N. (2013). How languages are learned (Oxford handbooks for language teachers) (4th ed.). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2009). Publication manual of the American psychological association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)
  • Richards, J. C., & Schmidt, R. (2010). Longman dictionary of language teaching and applied linguistics (4th ed.). Oxon, UK: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

TESL 5612:

Applied Language Study II

Professor:
Dr. David Beglar
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
September 8 - December 8
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00 - 21:00

The course reached its capacity. You will be put on the waiting list.

The last 70 years have seen a double revolution in linguistic theory: first the triumph of structural linguistics over traditional grammar, then the ascendancy of generative-transformational (G-T) analysis over structural linguistics. Today, textbooks and teaching materials based on structural linguistic theories and G-T theories are regularly published, even as traditional grammar continues to exert a strong influence on EFL methods and materials.

In this course participants will first examine parts of speech and the verb system of English. This will lay the foundation for an exploration of the theories and practices of generative-transformational grammar. Participants will study the principles of generative-transformational grammar and apply them by practicing the grammatical analyses related that theory. Participants will also complete a hands-on grammar-teaching project and write a synthesis paper regarding empirical research focused on grammar teaching. Other assignments include regular reading assignments, weekly homework assignments, and a final examination. Participants should read Chapters 1-7 in The Grammar Book before the first class meeting.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Larsen-Freeman, D., & Celce-Murcia, M. (2015). The grammar book: Form, meaning, and use for English language teachers (3rd ed.). Boston, MA: Heinle & Heinle. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2009). Concise rules of APA style (Concise rules of the American psychological association (APA) style) (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

TESL 5614:

TESOL Approaches to Teaching English

Professor:
Dr. Robert Nelson
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
September 5 - December 5
Day & Time:
Tuesday, 18:00 - 21:00

This course will explore, with breadth and depth, the state of the art in second language teaching pedagogy. The issues covered will be: the history of the field; theories of language learning and the principles connecting these theories to effective classroom practice (e.g., input, output, form-focused instruction, content- and task-based instruction); teaching the 4 skills, motivation, strategies-based instruction, assessment, form vs. function focused teaching, the role of the first language, and the evaluation of methods and materials. Other critical issues include the roles that culture and personality play in learning/teaching, assessment, and syllabus/curriculum writing. These issues will be covered by reading current articles from the ESL/EFL literature, as well as the textbooks. Students will produce lesson plans, a course syllabus, and a teaching philosophy. Active participation in discussion and frequent short papers are required. By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Express and defend the strategies, methods, and activities s/he wants to use as a teacher.
  2. Describe the role(s) of the teacher in language learning.
  3. Understand and appropriately employ the technical terminology of the field.
  4. Discuss and write about the methods and the major issues that presently define second/foreign language teaching.
  5. Design effective lesson plans and syllabi suited to multiple pedagogical contexts.
  6. Apply theoretical principles to classroom practice.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Brown, H. D., & Lee, H. (2015). Teaching by principles: An interactive approach to language pedagogy (4th ed.). White Plains, NY: Pearson Education. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com )
  • Dörnyei, Z. (2001). Motivational strategies in the language classroom. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2009). Concise rules of APA style (Concise rules of the American psychological association (APA) style) (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

TESL 5618:

Second Language Acquisition

Professor:
Dr. Tomoko Nemoto
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
September 7 - December 7
Day & Time:
Thursday, 18:00 - 21:00

The overarching purpose of this course is to canvass eight topics that are central to modern discussions of second language acquisition (SLA) and to thereby provide the participants with an opportunity to further develop and consolidate their understanding of SLA theory, models of language representation and use, and issues that directly affect classroom teaching. In the first part of the course, we look at (a) developmental patterns in SLA, (b) variability in learner language, and (c) input, interaction, and SLA. In the second part of the course, the focus is on (a) language transfer and (b) cognitive accounts of SLA. Finally, in the third part of the course, we read about (a) linguistic universals and SLA, (b) classroom interaction and SLA, and (c) form-focused instruction and SLA. Students will participate in and lead numerous group discussions, keep a running journal of the course readings, and take three in-class examinations.

The course is best taken by students who have already completed TESOL Approaches to Teaching English (TESL 5614), Teaching Second and Foreign Language Skills (TESL 5616), and Applied Language Study II (TESL 5612).

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Ellis, R. (2008). The study of second language acquisition (Oxford applied linguistics) (2nd ed.). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2009). Publication manual of the American psychological association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

A set of readings will be available on Blackboard.

ENES 8641:

Teaching Reading and Writing

Professor:
Dr. Robert Nelson
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
September 6 - December 6
Day & Time:
Wednesday, 18:00 - 21:00

This course offers an overview of the underlying concepts and skills that are needed for teaching that is focused on ESL and EFL literacy development. Students will acquire a fluency in the current best practices for the teaching of reading and writing in English as a Foreign/Second/Other Language. They will also become familiar with the theory behind the various current methods for planning, implementing, and assessing reading and writing instruction for all levels of ESL/EFL students, from pre-literacy to academic skills. This class will primarily use the academic and teaching literature to ensure the timeliness of the methods discussed. Students will also acquire a familiarity with research methods in these fields sufficient to enable them to make novel contributions. Specific topics will include reading comprehension, vocabulary development, the psycholinguistics of reading, the nature of academic literacy, the writing process, the effectiveness of written feedback, the social and institutional contexts of ESL/EFL reading and writing, and reading and writing assessment.

This course can be used as an elective credit for M.S.Ed. and Ed.D./Ph.D.degrees.

Required Textbook:

  • Chen, X., Dronjic, V., & Helms-Park, R. (2015). Reading in a second language: Cognitive and psycholinguistic issues. Oxon, UK: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)
  • Han, Z., & Anderson, N. J. (2009). Second language reading research and instruction: Crossing the boundaries. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)
  • Matsuda, P.K., & Silva, T. (Eds.). (2005). Second language writing research: Perspectives on the process of knowledge construction. Oxon, UK: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

FLED 8645:

Theory and Practice of Content & Language Integrated Learning (CLIL)

Professor:
Dr. Michael Bostwick
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
September 8 - December 8
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00 - 21:00

The role of content – how much does it belong in the foreign language class and how it should be integrated with language learning outcomes to promote language learning has been a debate since the 1980's (Pally, 1999). Since this time an extensive body of research has demonstrated that, "content-based instruction (CBI) is typically more effective than 'text-based' instruction across a wide range of L2 instructional contexts." (Brinton, et al., 2006, p 2).

Content and language integrated learning (CLIL) is the integration of particular content with language teaching aims. It is an innovative, instructional approach in which an "additional language" is interwoven with content to promote second language acquisition. It is based on the principle that successful language learning occurs when students are presented with target language material in meaningful, contextualized forms with the primary focus on acquiring information and knowledge. Content is the organizing principle, and other aspects of language (linguistic structures, vocabulary, functions) are presented as needed (Snow et al., 1989).

CLIL is multifaceted and complex, the goal of the course is to clarify some of these complexities and serve as a basis for identifying key features of this approach. Participants in the course will not only explore the theoretical underpinnings of CLIL they will also learn how to develop CLIL units of instruction and develop the knowledge and skills necessary to be an effective CLIL teacher - skills and knowledge that can be applied in a wide range of foreign language teaching contexts.

This course can be used as an elective credit for M.S.Ed. and Ed.D./Ph.D. degrees.

Required Textbook:

  • Llinares, A., & Morton, T. (Eds.). (2017). Applied linguistics perspectives on CLIL. Amsterdam, Netherlands: John Benjamins. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)
  • Ball, P., Kelly, K., & Clegg, J. (2016). Putting CLIL into practice. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

Recommended Textbook:

An additional set of readings will be available at the beginning of the course.

ENES 8744:

Psychology in Foreign Language Learning

Professor:
Dr. Kay Irie
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
September 4 - December 11
Day & Time:
Monday, 18:00 - 21:00

The class session 2 (Monday, September 11) is cancelled. The make-up session will be held on December 11.

Regardless of the type of language class, it is crucial for teachers to understand the minds and emotions of students and for students to be aware of themselves as learners. Psychology in Foreign Language Learning is an introductory course that provides an overview of current theory and research in the field with three goals: 1) to be familiar with psychological constructs that are relevant to language learning and teaching; 2) to deepen their insights into themselves as language learners, and 3) to reflect on their teaching practices using ideas and information gained in the course. The constructs to be covered in the course include identity, personality, affect, learning strategies and styles, motivation, and autonomy with a particular emphasis on the last two. Students are expected to submit a written summary of assigned readings every week and to be prepared to engage in class discussions sharing their learning and teaching experiences.

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ed.D./Ph.D.degrees.

Required Textbook:

  • Williams, M., Mercer, S., & Ryan, S. (2016). Exploring psychology in language learning and teaching. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

Recommended Textbook:

  • Dornyei, D., & Ryan, S. (2015). The Psychology of the language learner revisited (Second language acquisition research series). New York, NY: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

TESOL Special Projects - Distinguished Lecturer Series

This Lecturer Series will consist of three weekend seminars. Each seminar course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ed.D/Ph.D. degrees. The first three hours of each seminar (Saturday, 14:00 to 17:00) are free and open to the public. Weekend seminars are free for Master's and doctoral graduates of Temple University Japan Campus for auditing; the fee for other weekend auditors is ¥13,000.

ENES 8655: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 1):

Advances in Quantitative Research Methods in Language Teaching and Learning

Professor:
Dr. Luke Plonsky (Georgetown University, U.S.A.)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, September 16, 14:00 - 21:00
 
Sunday, September 17, 10:00 - 17:00

Empirical work in the field of second language teaching and learning has traditionally focused almost exclusively on theoretical and practical issues. In recent years, however, researchers have begun to reflect on—and even examine empirically—the field's research methods, leading to the current period of methodological development and reform. The interest in and potential impact of this rapidly expanding area is, however, not solely methodological. Rather, much if not most of the field's methodological efforts are predicated on and motivated by the notion that our knowledge of second language learning and teaching can only be advanced via empirical research that is rigorously designed, executed, and reported. This seminar will examine a number of concepts and techniques related to recent efforts to improve quantitative research practices in the field. Among other topics, we will address the notion of statistical significance (p values) vs. practical significance (effect sizes). The lecture will also provide a workshop on how to conduct a meta-analysis of L2 research. The discussions will aim to be interactive and not highly technical, and there will be plenty of time for hands-on practice with sample data sets that will be provided.

Suggested Reading:

  • Plonsky, L. (Ed.). (2015). Advancing quantitative methods in second language research. Oxon, UK: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

ENES 8656: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 2):

Researching L2 Pronunciation

Professor:
Dr. Murray Munro (Simon Fraser University, Canada)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, September 23, 14:00 - 21:00
 
Sunday, Sunday, September 24, 10:00 - 17:00

Over the past 20 years, second-language (L2) pronunciation has gained an increasingly prominent role in applied linguistics research. It is now the focus of several annual international conferences, has its own journal, and is the subject of a number of recent textbooks and other influential resources. A remarkable aspect of L2 pronunciation is the wide range of issues that it encompasses, including learners' perceptions of segmental distinctions; the nature of global L2 speech properties such as accentedness, intelligibility and comprehensibility; local aspects of segmental and prosodic production; effects of interventions on learning; acoustic properties of non-native vs native speech; and social evaluation of L2 speakers. Given such diversity, pronunciation researchers require a good understanding of the varied quantitative methodologies, data collection procedures and data analysis techniques used in contemporary work. Through lectures, discussions and interactive tasks, we will survey up-to-date approaches to designing and carrying out pronunciation studies, and to interpreting data. The seminar will cover the use of current software applications and will incorporate recorded speech examples.

Recommended Textbook:

  • Derwing, T. M., & Munro, M.J. (2015). Pronunciation fundamentals: Evidence-based perspectives for L2 teaching and research. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

ENES 8657: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 3):

Understanding Language Course Design as a Problem-Solving Process

Professor:
Dr. David Crabbe (Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, October 21, 14:00 - 21:00
 
Sunday, October 22, 10:00 - 17:00

Course design at its most basic is specifying learning goals, together with effective learning opportunities to achieve those goals. But it is more exciting than that. Course design in practice and in context is not static. It requires systematic and on-going problem-solving that starts with understanding the people concerned and the resources available. The understanding entails elements such as the potential roles of learners and teachers, their motivation and beliefs, the opportunities available in and out of the classroom for communicative performance, ways of enhancing that performance, ways of describing it for better metacognitive understanding, and any obstacles in taking up the opportunities.

This course will provide a framework for course design as informed problem-solving, drawing on what are seen as universals of human language learning and focussing on how those universals might be activated in context. The framework will raise questions about, for example: the role of the learners in the problem-solving; how their autonomy and motivation as members of a learning community might be fostered; how the impact of examinations could be managed productively; and how a bridge might be built between the classroom and the private domain of learning. Attention will be paid throughout to continually evaluating the impact of actions taken.

Doctoral Courses

EDUC 9998:

Dissertation Proposal Writing

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1 - 3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

This course is for those Ph.D. students who have passed the Qualifying Examination and working on their dissertation proposal.

The Ph.D. students are required to take Culminating Courses (6 semester hours overall, minimum 2 semester hours of ED 9999). Culminating Courses: Qualifying Exam Preparation Course (ED9994), Proposal Writing Course (ED9998) and Dissertation Writing Course (ED9999).

ENES 9882/ EPSY 9982:

Graduate Independent Study

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1 - 3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

This is a one-to-three credit course offered to Ed.D. candidates who are planning or writing dissertations. Consultations will be individual, and appointments will be arranged via e-mail in advance. The main aim of the course is to troubleshoot design, data collection, management, and analysis problems, as well as to encourage substantive progress on dissertation projects.

Students wishing to register for this course should obtain permission from the professor and complete the registration process during the priority or late registration period.

EDUC 9999:

Dissertation Writing

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1 - 3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

Six credit hours of Education 9999 are required for Ed.D. candidates. The Ph.D. students are required to take Culminating Courses (6 semester hours overall, minimum 2 semester hours of ED 9999). Culminating Courses: Qualifying Exam Preparation Course (ED9994), Proposal Writing Course (ED9998) and Dissertation Writing Course (ED9999).

Students wishing to register for this course should obtain permission from the professor and complete the registration process during the registration period.

EDUC 9282:

Research Apprenticeship

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

The Ph.D. students and Ed.D. students who are thinking about graduating with a Ph.D. degree must take two 3-credits Research Apprenticeship courses.

If you wish to take an Apprenticeship course, you first need to write a 300-400-word abstract of your proposed project (unless you are assisting a professor with one of his or her studies). This abstract should include basic information such as (a) the gaps in the literature you are addressing, (b) the purpose(s) of the study, (c) specific research questions, and (d) your methodology, including information about the participants, instruments, procedures, and the analyses you will perform. You will then need to send the abstract to the advisor you wish to work with (Consult the list of Apprenticeship advisors on the registration form to see who is available), and if the advisor approves your plan, you can then register for the course with that advisor.

For Ph.D. candidates only

Students in the Ph.D. program are required to take the doctoral seminars listed below.

EDUC 8104:

Epistemology and Method in Educational Research

Professor:
Dr. Jim Sick
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
September 8 - December 2
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00 - 21:00
Saturday, 14:00 - 17:00

For more details about the schedule, please check the schedule chart below.

This course will provide a general introduction to research in the social sciences and a broad overview of various research methods currently employed in applied linguistics and educational psychology. In addition to the textbook topics, students will critically read example research articles in order to gain familiarity with the presentation of research results, to evaluate the validity and appropriateness of the methods employed, and to become informed about current topics of interest in the field of second language education. Emphasis will be placed on identifying gaps in current knowledge with a view toward generating questions for guiding future research. By the end of this course, participants will develop a clear understanding of the roles of quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-methods research protocols currently employed in second language acquisition research Specific topics to be covered include 1) current ethical standards for research involving human subjects, 2) methods of data collection and organization, 3) coding and interpretation of qualitative data, 4) reliability and validity of quantitative variables, 5) assessing the internal and external validity of various research designs, 6) construction and validation of quantitative variables, and 7) effective integration and cross-validation of qualitative and quantitative approaches. Assessment will based on critical responses to readings, a final project, plus regular short quizzes and data analyses provided through the online course website.

This course is required for the Ph. D. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Trochim, W., Donnelly, J.P., & Arora, K. (2015). Research methods: The essential knowledge base (2nd ed.). Belmont CA: Wadsworth. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)
  • Mackey, A., & Gass M.S. (2015). Second language research: Methodology and design (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

Recommended Textbook:

In addition to the textbook topics, students will critically read example research articles.

Dr. Sick's Class Schedule

Session Day Date Class Time Note
1 Friday September 8, 2017 18:00 - 21:00  
2 Saturday September 9, 2017 14:00 - 17:00  
3 Friday September 22, 2017 18:00 - 21:00  
4 Saturday September 23, 2017 14:00 - 17:00  
5 Friday October 6, 2017 18:00 - 21:00  
6 Saturday October 7, 2017 14:00 - 17:00  
7 Friday October 20, 2017 18:00 - 21:00  
8 Saturday October 21, 2017 14:00 - 17:00  
9 Friday November 3, 2017 18:00 - 21:00  
10 Saturday November 4, 2017 14:00 - 17:00  
11 Friday November 17, 2017 18:00 - 21:00  
12 Saturday November 18, 2017 14:00 - 17:00 Class cancellation due to the JALT annual conference. Make-up session is scheduled to be held on Sat, 12/2 (10-13)
12 Friday December 1, 2017 18:00 - 21:00  
13 Saturday December 2, 2017 10:00 - 13:00 Time changed
14 Saturday December 2, 2017 14:00 - 17:00  

EPSY 8825:

Introduction to Education Statistics

Professor:
Dr. Tomoko Nemoto
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
September 15 - December 8
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00 - 21:00
Saturday, 14:00 - 17:00

For more details about the schedule, please check the schedule chart below.

The purpose of the course is to provide an intensive overview of the basic research design and statistical procedures used in second language quantitative research. In the first part of the course, we cover the calculation of descriptive statistics (e.g., mean and standard deviation), nominal, ordinal, and interval scales of measurement, and correlation among different scales of measurement. In the second part of the course, we look at quantitative research designs and how they have been utilized in the field of second language acquisition. This topic leads into a discussion of methods of evaluating quantitative data assumptions of various multivariate techniques and of how common multivariate procedures, the Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) family, correlation analysis, multiple regression models, and factor analysis, are used. Two non-parametric procedures, the one-sample chi-square test, two-way contingency table analysis, and Factor Analysis are introduced. Students have opportunities to become familiar with these statistical techniques through course readings, the critical analysis of published research, and by using statistical computer packages such as SPSS.

This course is required for the Ph. D. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Larson-Hall, J.(2016). A guide to doing statistics in second language research using SPSS and R. (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2009). Publication manual of the American psychological association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

A set of readings will be available on Blackboard. Students are required to bring in a personal computer with SPSS installed.

Dr. Nemoto's Class Schedule

Session Day Date Class Time Note
1 Friday September 15, 2017 18:00 - 21:00  
2 Saturday September 16, 2017 10:00 - 13:00 Time changed due to seminar 1
3 Saturday September 16, 2017 14:00 - 17:00 Students must attend Dr. Plonsky's seminar (Sat, 9/16, 14-17) in lieu of session 14 (Sat, 12/9)
4 Friday September 29, 2017 18:00 - 21:00  
5 Saturday September 30, 2017 14:00 - 17:00  
6 Friday October 13, 2017 18:00 - 21:00  
7 Saturday October 14, 2017 14:00 - 17:00  
8 Friday October 27, 2017 18:00 - 21:00  
9 Saturday October 28, 2017 14:00 - 17:00  
10 Friday November 10, 2017 18:00 - 21:00  
11 Saturday November 11, 2017 14:00 - 17:00  
12 Friday November 24, 2017 18:00 - 21:00  
13 Saturday November 25, 2017 14:00 - 17:00  
14 Friday December 8, 2017 18:00 - 21:00  
14 Saturday December 9, 2017 14:00 - 17:00 Class cancellation
Student must attend seminar 1(Sat, 9/16) in lieu of this class