Course Descriptions (Osaka)

To register for any of the courses below, follow the procedures described in Course Registration. If you already know the process, go to the Registration Form.

Important Notice about Textbooks

To purchase textbooks, click Amazon link below next to each textbook title. Amazon has secured some copies of each required book especially for TUJ students to order. In order to get your textbooks in time for the start of the semester, please order them as soon as you register for courses. Make sure to order through the provided Amazon links in this page.

Summer Session I 2017

FLED 5470:

Introduction to the Study of TESOL

Professor:
Dr. Donna Fujimoto
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 10 - August 9
Day & Time:
Wednesday, 18:00 - 21:00

The primary purposes of this course are: (a) to help new students develop the special skills that they will need to succeed in the M.S.Ed. program, and (b) to provide an overview of the field of TESOL before the new students will further explore the M.S. Ed. program. The course will focus on:

  1. Academic skills development (TU Portal and library use, reading, organizing notes, discussion, writing definitions, summaries, and essays, presentation, and test taking);
  2. Overview of theories in TESOL;
  3. Overview of foreign language teaching approaches;
  4. The technical terms in TESOL; and
  5. APA writing style.

The course is designed for students who are new to the M.S.Ed. program, who have little or no experience studying in an English-language university, or who are not familiar with formal academic reading, writing, discussion, presentation, and test taking. The course is not designed for students who have already taken some other courses in the program though the course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Lightbown, P. M., & Spada, N. (2013). How Languages Are Learned (Oxford Handbooks for Language Teachers) (4th ed.). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2009). Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)
  • Richards, J. C., & Schmidt, R. (2010). Longman Dictionary of Language Teaching and Applied Linguistics (4th ed.). Oxon, UK: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

ENES 8645:

Adapting and Developing Language Teaching Materials

Professor:
Dr. David Beglar
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 9 - June 22
Day & Time:
Tuesday and Thursday, 18:00-21:00

High quality language teaching materials are a critical component of any language teaching program. Although textbooks published by major publishers have undergone noticeable improvements in the past four decades, the fact remains that commercially produced materials are designed to be used with a wide variety of learners who often reside in different countries and speak different native languages. For this reason, many instructors find it difficult to find texts that are appropriate for their specific teaching situations. The purpose of this course is to allow students to (a) explore the options available in terms of commercially-produced texts, (b) learn to analyze the strengths and weaknesses of those texts in the light of research on successful second language acquisition, (c) consider how commercially-produced texts can be usefully adapted to specific situations, and (d) plan and produce original materials in an area of their choice (e.g., listening, speaking, reading, or writing). Topics that will be covered in the course include (a) selecting principles for evaluating and producing pedagogical materials, (b) specifying goals and objectives at the levels of curriculum and task, (c) enhancing affective factors such as motivation and confidence, and (d) using strategies for effective page layout.

Students taking this course will be required to actively participate in weekly class activities and produce a final course project of an adapted or completely original teaching unit and a description of the theoretical and/or researched-based underpinnings of those materials. Course participants should read Chapters 1-5 in the textbook before the first class session.

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ed.D./Ph.D. degrees.

Required Textbook:

  • Wiggins, G., & McTighe, J. (2005). Understanding by Design (2nd ed.). Alexandria, VA: Prentice Hall. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

EDUC 8273:

ESP and ELF: Exploring the Concepts, Pedagogy and Current Issues of Genres for Professional Discourse

Professor:
Dr. Judy Noguchi
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 8 - June 21
Day & Time:
Monday and Wednesday, 18:00-21:00

The class on Wednesday, May 31 is cancelled. The make-up class will be held on Friday, June 9.

Communication in the professions, be it for people engaged in business, academia, medicine or research, requires a common language, which in today's globally connected world is English. For a professional whose native language is not English, this can be a barrier to active participation in the target discourse community. One way to resolve this issue is by using concepts developed by those working in ESP (English for Specific Purposes). However, criticism has been lodged against ESP as being too formulaic and stifling of creativity. Such concerns will be discussed with consideration of the reasons behind the use of professional genres. Another issue which now demands more attention is the role of ELF (English as a lingua franca). As the number of nonnative English speakers using English for professional purposes increases, issues arise with respect to the level of language that can be considered acceptable. We will explore the theoretical concepts underlying ESP and ELF and try to develop an understanding of how they can aid tertiary level teaching and learning of the various genres needed for professional discourse.

The course will take a hands-on approach to exploring the concepts and issues of ESP and ELF today. Students will be expected to report on reading assignments (from the textbooks and selected journal articles), complete a course project related to the topics and issues discussed in the course, and give a 15- to 20-minute presentation to share their work with other participants.

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ed.D./Ph.D. degrees.

Required Textbook:

  • Paltridge, B., & Starfield, S. (2014). The Handbook of English for Specific Purposes. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)
  • Seidlhofer, B. (2009). Understanding English as a Lingua Franca: Oxford Applied Linguistics. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

Summer Session II 2017

EDUC 5212:

Curriculum Development for Language Teachers

Professor:
Prof. Tim Doe
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
June 26 - August 12
Day & Time:
Monday, 18:00 - 21:00 and Saturday, 14:00 - 17:00

The class meeting time on July 1 will be changed to 10:00-13:00 from 14:00-17:00 due to seminar III. The time of class on July 29 will be changed to 10:00-13:00 from 14:00-17:00 due to JALT SIG conference.

The primary aim of this course is to provide a broad overview of contemporary issues in the design of educational curricula. It is hoped that accomplishing this aim will lead participants to develop a clearer understanding of the complexities of designing and implementing foreign language curricula and greater confidence and skill in undertaking such a task.

The main topics to be covered include: 1) the origins of curriculum development, including the philosophical, cognitive, and social foundations underlying educational curricula; 2) options for curriculum design; 3) needs, aims, goals and objectives; 4) the role of tests and instructional materials in the curriculum; 5) providing for effective teaching and teacher training; and, 6) the assessment and evaluation of both students and the curriculum itself.

Participants in the course will lead several small group discussions, write a number of short responses to issues raised in the course, develop a detailed curriculum plan for a specific educational institution or educational context, and take a final test.

This course can be used as elective credit for the Master's and Ed.D./Ph.D. degrees.

Required Textbook:

  • Nation, I.S.P., & Macalister, J. (2010). Language Curriculum Design. New York, NY: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)
  • Brown, J. D. (1995). The Elements of Language Curriculum: A Systematic Approach to Program Development. Boston, MA: Heinle Cengage Learning. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2009). Concise Rules of APA Style (Concise Rules of the American Psychological Association (APA) Style) (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

Additional readings will be provided.

EDUC 8252:

Sociolinguistics

Professor:
Dr. Steven Ross
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
June 27 - August 10
Day & Time:
Tuesday and Thursday, 18:00-21:00

Sociolinguistics is the study of language use in society. With a particular focus on variation, this course will introduce the core concepts and methods of sociolinguistics. The syllabus will focus on identifying linguistic variables, change over time, the social-economic distribution of language, dialect, gender, style, register, ethnicity, and cross-generational factors. Examples will be taken from language use in the English speaking world, and from Japan. Variation analysis will focus on phonological variables, morpho-syntactic variation, discourse feature variation, and tense and aspect variation. Students will get first- hand experience in performing quantitative analyses to explore data and test hypotheses using downloadable Rbrul software. We will also explore how variation analysis can be applied to learners' developing grammars and phonological systems. This course will be of particular relevance to students with an interest in linguistics and to students exploring potential thesis topics.

Students are required to have Rbrul (a freeware).

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ed.D./Ph.D. degrees.

Required Textbook:

  • Tagliamonte, S.A. (2012). Variationist Sociolinguistics. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

TESOL Special Projects - Distinguished Lecturer Series

This Lecturer Series will consist of three weekend seminars. Each seminar course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed., Ed.D. and Ph.D. degrees. The first three hours of each seminar (Saturday,14:00 to 17:00) are free and open to the public. Weekend seminars are free for Master’s and doctoral graduates of Temple University Japan Campus; the fee for other weekend auditors is ¥13,000.

ENES 8655: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 1):

Invariant Measurement with Rasch Models for Rater-Mediated Assessments

Professor:
Dr. George Engelhard (The University of Georgia, U.S.A.)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, May 20, 14:00 - 21:00
 
Sunday, May 21, 10:00 - 17:00

Measurement issues play a critical role in discussions of second language acquisition. This seminar examines key psychometric issues related to invariant measurement based on Rasch models for rater-mediated assessments. The basic goal of invariant measurement is to develop useful scales to measure the latent variables that have high levels of stability and consistency. In other words, we seek to develop scales that will "stay put when our backs our turned". The assessment of competency in a second language frequently includes the use of rating scales to collect human judgments. This seminar focuses on guiding principles that can be used for the creation, evaluation and maintenance of invariant assessment systems based on human judgments.

Selected chapters from my new book with Professor Stefanie Wind will be shared with participants in the seminar. Participants in the seminar are encouraged to bring rater-mediated data sets for analyses with the Facets computer program (Rasch model).

Recommended Textbook:

  • Engelhard, G., Jr. (2013). Invariant Measurement: Using Rasch Models in the Social, Behavioral, and Health Sciences. New York, NY: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)
  • Engelhard, G., Jr., & Wind, S.A. (in press). Invariant Measurement with Raters and Rating Scales: Rasch Models for Rater-mediated Assessments. New York, NY: Routledge.

ENES 8656: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 2):

Cognitive and Corpus Linguistics-Inspired Approaches to Lexico-Grammar Instruction

Professor:
Dr. Dilin Liu (University of Alabama, U.S.A.)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, June 24, 14:00 - 21:00
 
Sunday, June 25, 10:00 - 17:00

Grammar and vocabulary are arguably two of the most important, albeit most difficult, aspects in second language learning. How to effectively teach these important aspects of language has long been a challenge. In the past few decades, contemporary linguistic approaches, such as systemic functional, cognitive, and corpus linguistics, have brought about new understandings about language, including the theory that language is a usage-based system motivated by our embodied conceptualization and the perspective that that grammar and vocabulary are two ends of one continuum rather than being two rigid separate entities. These understandings have inspired the development of more engaging and effective practices for lexico-grammar instruction. This seminar explores such cognitive and corpus linguistics-inspired approaches to lexico-grammar instruction.

Through lectures and discussions, we will first examine the main new theories and understandings about language and language acquisition espoused by the contemporary linguistics approaches and their implications for the teaching of lexico-grammar. Then, using concrete examples, we learn first-hand how such approaches can be used to help teach more engagingly and effectively various challenging aspects of lexico-grammar, including articles, parts of speech, prepositions, tense/aspect, synonyms, and word collocations. These examples will not only provide participants with ready-to-use activities but also help them reflect and innovate with new lexico-grammar teaching practices of their own.

Recommended Textbook:

  • Liu, D. (2014). Describing and Explaining Grammar and Vocabulary in ELT: Key Theories and Effective Practices. Oxon, UK: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)
  • Liu, D. & Lei, L. (2017). Using Corpora for Language Learning and Teaching. Alexandria, VA: TESOL Press. (Buy on Amazon.com)

ENES 8657: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 3):

Oral Corrective Feedback in Language Pedagogy and SLA

Professor:
Dr. Rod Ellis (Curtin University, Australia)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, July 1, 14:00 - 21:00
 
Sunday, July 2, 10:00 - 17:00

The purpose of this seminar is to explore the extent to which the approach to correcting learners oral errors evident in popular teacher guides is compatible with research that has investigated the effect of oral corrective feedback on second language acquisition. The approach adopted will be to first undertake a critical review of standard pedagogic positions regarding the provision of oral corrective feedback and then examine what second language acquisition researchers have discovered about the effect it has on acquisition. In this way, SLA theory and research serves as a basis for reflecting critically on established pedagogical practices.

Topics

  1. Introduction - what is 'oral corrective feedback'?
  2. Pedagogical positions relating to:
    • Whether to correct
    • What to correct
    • When to correct
    • How to correct
    • Who does the correction
  3. Theoretical perspectives on oral corrective feedback in SLA
  4. Types of oral corrective feedback
  5. Research investigating oral corrective feedback
  6. Evaluating the pedagogical positions

Methodology

The seminar will be taught by means of lectures followed up by questions and tasks which seminar participants will perform to apply the content covered in the lectures. Participants will be invited to formulate their own policy for carrying out oral corrective feedback in classrooms.

Doctoral Courses

EDUC 9998:

Dissertation Proposal Writing

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1-3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

This course is for those Ph.D. students who have passed the Qualifying Examination and working on their dissertation proposal.

The Ph.D. students are required to take Culminating Courses (6 semester hours overall, minimum 2 semester hours of ED 9999). Culminating Courses: Qualifying Exam Preparation Course (ED9994), Proposal Writing Course (ED9998) and Dissertation Writing Course (ED9999).

ENES 9882/ EPSY 9982:

Graduate Independent Study

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1-3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

This is a one-to-three credit course offered to doctoral candidates who are planning or writing dissertations. Consultations will be individual, and appointments will be arranged via e-mail in advance. The main aim of the course is to troubleshoot design, data collection, management, and analysis problems, as well as to encourage substantive progress on dissertation projects.

Students wishing to register for this course should obtain permission from the professor and complete the registration process during the priority or late registration period.

EDUC 9999:

Dissertation Writing

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1-3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

Six credit hours of Education 9999 are required for Ed.D./Ph.D.degrees.

Students wishing to register for this course should obtain permission from the professor and complete the registration process during the registration period.

EDUC 9282:

Research Apprenticeship

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

Required course for the Ph.D. students. Ed.D. students who are thinking about graduating with a Ph.D. degree must take two 3-credit Research Apprenticeship courses.

If you wish to take an apprenticeship course, you first need to write a 300-400-word abstract of your proposed project (unless you are assisting a professor with one of his or her studies). This abstract should include basic information such as (a) the gaps in the literature you are addressing, (b) the purpose(s) of the study, (c) specific research questions, and (d) your methodology, including information about the participants, instruments, procedures, and the analyses you will perform. You will then need to send the abstract to the advisor you wish to work with (Consult the list of Apprenticeship advisors on the registration form to see who is available), and if the advisor approves your plan, you can then register for the course with that advisor.

EDUC 9994:

Qualifying Examination

Professor:
Dr. David Beglar
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
By Arrangement

Ph.D. students who will be taking Qualifying Examination are required to register for 1-credit EDUC 9994, Qualifying Examination course, in Summer Session I, 2017.