Course Descriptions (Osaka)

To register for any of the courses below, follow the procedures described in Course Registration. If you already know the process, go to the Registration Form.

Important Notice about Textbooks

To purchase textbooks, click Amazon link below next to each textbook title. In order to get your textbooks in time for the start of the semester, please order them as soon as you register for courses. Make sure to order through the provided Amazon links in this page.

Fall Semester 2017

FLED 5470:

Introduction to the Study of TESOL

Professor:
Dr. Donna Fujimoto
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
September 13 - December 13
Day & Time:
Wednesday, 18:00 - 21:00

*As the first class meeting for this course is on Wednesday, September 13, after the add/drop period ends, the Office will accept drops only for this course until 21:30 on Wednesday, September 13 (after the first class meeting ends).

The primary purposes of this course are: (a) to help new students develop the special skills that they will need to succeed in the M.S.Ed. program, and (b) to provide an overview of the field of TESOL before the new students will further explore the M.S. Ed. program. The course will focus on:

  1. Academic skills development (TU Portal and library use, reading, organizing notes, discussion, writing definitions, summaries, and essays, presentation, and test taking);
  2. Overview of theories in TESOL;
  3. Overview of foreign language teaching approaches;
  4. The technical terms in TESOL; and
  5. APA writing style.

The course is designed for students who are new to the M.S.Ed. program, who have little or no experience studying in an English-language university, or who are not familiar with formal academic reading, writing, discussion, presentation, and test taking. The course is not designed for students who have already taken some other courses in the program though this course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Lightbown, P. M., & Spada, N. (2013). How languages are learned (Oxford handbooks for language teachers) (4th ed.). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2009). Publication manual of the american psychological association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)
  • Richards, J. C., & Schmidt, R. (2010). Longman dictionary of language teaching and applied linguistics (4th ed.). Oxon, UK: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

TESL 5612:

Applied Language Study II

Professor:
Dr. David Beglar
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
September 5 - December 5
Day & Time:
Tuesday, 18:00-21:00

The last 70 years have seen a double revolution in linguistic theory: first the triumph of structural linguistics over traditional grammar, then the ascendancy of generative-transformational (G-T) analysis over structural linguistics. Today, textbooks and teaching materials based on structural linguistic theories and G-T theories are regularly published, even as traditional grammar continues to exert a strong influence on EFL methods and materials.

In this course participants will first examine parts of speech and the verb system of English. This will lay the foundation for an exploration of the theories and practices of generative-transformational grammar. Participants will study the principles of generative-transformational grammar and apply them by practicing the grammatical analyses related that theory. Participants will also complete a hands-on grammar-teaching project and write a synthesis paper regarding empirical research focused on grammar teaching. Other assignments include regular reading assignments, weekly homework assignments, and a final examination. Participants should read Chapters 1-7 in The Grammar Book before the first class meeting.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Larsen-Freeman, D., & Celce-Murcia, M. (2015). The grammar book: Form, meaning, and use for English language teachers (3rd ed.). Boston, MA: Heinle & Heinle. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com )
  • American Psychological Association. (2009). Concise rules of APA style (Concise rules of the American psychological association (APA) style) (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

TESL 5614:

TESOL Approaches to Teaching English

Professor:
Prof. Tim Doe
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
September 4 - December 4
Day & Time:
Monday, 18:00 - 21:00

The purpose of this course is to enable participants to develop an awareness of second language theory and classroom practice. Issues to be investigated include: an account of the central processes of learning and the conditions believed to promote language acquisition; the elements of a language learning curriculum and their relation to the processes by which learners acquire language; past methods and current approaches to language teaching; and various types of materials and activities believed to foster acquisition. Participants will be encouraged to consider how these issues relate to their own classroom contexts and develop a personal set of teaching principles. Sessions will cover topics such as the roles of input, output, form-focused instruction, fluency development, motivation, content-based and task-based language teaching.

In addition to required reading, participants will take two quizzes, a mid-term and final exam, make written responses to important issues discussed in the course, lead a number of small group discussions, write a course paper focused on a topic related to the course, and make a short, oral presentation.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Dörnyei, Z. (2001). Motivational strategies in the language classroom. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)
  • Brown, H. D., & Lee, H. (2015). Teaching by principles: An interactive approach to language pedagogy (4th ed.). White Plains, NY: Pearson Education. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2009). Concise rules of APA style (Concise rules of the American psychological association (APA) style) (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

Additional readings will be provided by the instructor.

ENES 8645:

Corpus Linguistics for the Classroom

Professor:
Dr. Judy Noguchi
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
September 7 - December 14
Day & Time:
Thursday, 18:00 - 21:00

The class of session 14, Thursday, December 7 is cancelled. The Make-up class will be held on Thursday, December 14.

Corpus linguistics is becoming more and more important today as electronic devices and software become able to cope with large amounts of data. In fact, corpora, i.e., large amounts of natural language, are being used in various ways to observe the patterns of human behavior and make predictions based on them. In this class, we will review the development of corpus linguistics by examining its development at various universities in Europe and the United States, consider legal and ethical issues arising from using authentic texts, examine different types of corpora and their uses, and learn about the theories and concepts that underlie the field. An important part of the course will be actually working with corpora and analysis tools (concordance software) to find ways to help you with your language teaching and research. The course will not require computational skills. The concordance software to be used is free of charge and can be used with either Windows or Mac computers.

This course can be used as an elective credit for M.S.Ed. and Ed.D./Ph.D.degrees.

Required Textbook:

ENES 8654:

Conversational Analysis: Applications and Implications for the Language Classroom

Professor:
Dr. Donna Fujimoto
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
September 12 - December 12
Day & Time:
Tuesday, 18:00 - 21:00

This course has been canceled.

This is an introductory course to the methodology of Conversation Analysis (CA). Students will learn the basic concepts, the CA-specific terminology, and the CA transcription conventions. In addition to the reading, students will learn to make detailed transcriptions of excerpts of interaction, and they will practice making observations after repeated and in-depth listening.

CA methodology takes an emic approach, and therefore students will be asked to take the insider's view—the participant's perspective. CA analysis attempts to uncover the organization of people's interactions and to articulate the tacit rules and procedures underlying these actions. By closely examining interactional practices, students will be able to discover applications and implications to the language classroom.

This course can be used as an elective credit for M.S.Ed. and Ed.D./Ph.D.degrees.

Required Textbook:

  • Wong, J., & Waring, H. Z. (2010). Conversation analysis and second language pedagogy: A guide for ESL/EFL teachers. New York, NY: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)
  • Hutchby, I., & Wooffitt, R. (2008). Conversation analysis (2nd ed.). Cambridge, UK: Polity Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

TESOL Special Projects - Distinguished Lecturer Series

This Lecturer Series will consist of three weekend seminars. Each seminar course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed., Ed.D. and Ph.D. degrees. The first three hours of each seminar (Saturday,14:00 to 17:00) are free and open to the public. Weekend seminars are free for Master's and doctoral graduates of Temple University Japan Campus; the fee for other weekend auditors is ¥13,000.

ENES 8655: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 1):

Advances in Quantitative Research Methods in Language Teaching and Learning

Professor:
Dr. Luke Plonsky (Georgetown University, U.S.A.)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, September 23, 14:00 - 21:00
 
Sunday, September 24, 10:00 - 17:00

Empirical work in the field of second language teaching and learning has traditionally focused almost exclusively on theoretical and practical issues. In recent years, however, researchers have begun to reflect on—and even examine empirically—the field's research methods, leading to the current period of methodological development and reform. The interest in and potential impact of this rapidly expanding area is, however, not solely methodological. Rather, much if not most of the field's methodological efforts are predicated on and motivated by the notion that our knowledge of second language learning and teaching can only be advanced via empirical research that is rigorously designed, executed, and reported. This seminar will examine a number of concepts and techniques related to recent efforts to improve quantitative research practices in the field. Among other topics, we will address the notion of statistical significance (p values) vs. practical significance (effect sizes). The lecture will also provide a workshop on how to conduct a meta-analysis of L2 research. The discussions will aim to be interactive and not highly technical, and there will be plenty of time for hands-on practice with sample data sets that will be provided.

Suggested Reading:

  • Plonsky, L. (Ed.). (2015). Advancing quantitative methods in second language research. Oxon, UK: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

ENES 8656: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 2):

Researching L2 Pronunciation

Professor:
Dr. Murray Munro (Simon Fraser University, Canada)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, September 30, 14:00 - 21:00
 
Sunday, October 1, 10:00 - 17:00

Over the past 20 years, second-language (L2) pronunciation has gained an increasingly prominent role in applied linguistics research. It is now the focus of several annual international conferences, has its own journal, and is the subject of a number of recent textbooks and other influential resources. A remarkable aspect of L2 pronunciation is the wide range of issues that it encompasses, including learners' perceptions of segmental distinctions; the nature of global L2 speech properties such as accentedness, intelligibility and comprehensibility; local aspects of segmental and prosodic production; effects of interventions on learning; acoustic properties of non-native vs native speech; and social evaluation of L2 speakers. Given such diversity, pronunciation researchers require a good understanding of the varied quantitative methodologies, data collection procedures and data analysis techniques used in contemporary work. Through lectures, discussions and interactive tasks, we will survey up-to-date approaches to designing and carrying out pronunciation studies, and to interpreting data. The seminar will cover the use of current software applications and will incorporate recorded speech examples.

Recommended Textbook:

  • Derwing, T. M., & Munro, M.J. (2015). Pronunciation fundamentals: Evidence-based perspectives for L2 teaching and research. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

ENES 8657: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 3):

Understanding Language Course Design as a Problem-Solving Process

Professor:
Dr. David Crabbe (Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, October 28, 14:00 - 21:00
 
Sunday, October 29, 10:00 - 17:00

Course design at its most basic is specifying learning goals, together with effective learning opportunities to achieve those goals. But it is more exciting than that. Course design in practice and in context is not static. It requires systematic and on-going problem-solving that starts with understanding the people concerned and the resources available. The understanding entails elements such as the potential roles of learners and teachers, their motivation and beliefs, the opportunities available in and out of the classroom for communicative performance, ways of enhancing that performance, ways of describing it for better metacognitive understanding, and any obstacles in taking up the opportunities.

This course will provide a framework for course design as informed problem-solving, drawing on what are seen as universals of human language learning and focussing on how those universals might be activated in context. The framework will raise questions about, for example: the role of the learners in the problem-solving; how their autonomy and motivation as members of a learning community might be fostered; how the impact of examinations could be managed productively; and how a bridge might be built between the classroom and the private domain of learning. Attention will be paid throughout to continually evaluating the impact of actions taken.

Doctoral Courses

EDUC 9998:

Dissertation Proposal Writing

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1-3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

This course is for those Ph.D. students who have passed the Qualifying Examination and working on their dissertation proposal.

The Ph.D. students are required to take Culminating Courses (6 semester hours overall, minimum 2 semester hours of ED 9999). Culminating Courses: Qualifying Exam Preparation Course (ED9994), Proposal Writing Course (ED9998) and Dissertation Writing Course (ED9999).

ENES 9882/ EPSY 9982:

Graduate Independent Study

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1-3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

This is a one-to-three credit course offered to Ed.D. candidates who are planning or writing dissertations. Consultations will be individual, and appointments will be arranged via e-mail in advance. The main aim of the course is to troubleshoot design, data collection, management, and analysis problems, as well as to encourage substantive progress on dissertation projects.

Students wishing to register for this course should obtain permission from the professor and complete the registration process during the priority or late registration period.

EDUC 9999:

Dissertation Writing

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1-3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

Six credit hours of Education 9999 are required for Ed.D. candidates. The Ph.D. students are required to take Culminating Courses (6 semester hours overall, minimum 2 semester hours of ED 9999). Culminating Courses: Qualifying Exam Preparation Course (ED9994), Proposal Writing Course (ED9998) and Dissertation Writing Course (ED9999).

Students wishing to register for this course should obtain permission from the professor and complete the registration process during the registration period.

EDUC 9282:

Research Apprenticeship

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

Ph.D. students and Ed.D. students who are thinking about graduating with a Ph.D. degree must take two 3-credits Research Apprenticeship courses.

If you wish to take an Apprenticeship course, you first need to write a 300-400-word abstract of your proposed project (unless you are assisting a professor with one of his or her studies). This abstract should include basic information such as (a) the gaps in the literature you are addressing, (b) the purpose(s) of the study, (c) specific research questions, and (d) your methodology, including information about the participants, instruments, procedures, and the analyses you will perform. You will then need to send the abstract to the advisor you wish to work with (Consult the list of Apprenticeship advisors on the registration form to see who is available), and if the advisor approves your plan, you can then register for the course with that advisor.

For Ph.D. candidates only

Students in the Ph.D. program are required to take the doctoral seminars listed below.

EDUC 8104:

Epistemology and Method in Educational Research

Professor:
Dr. Jim Sick
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
September 15 - December 9
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00 - 21:00
Saturday, 14:00 - 17:00
Check the schedule chart below for more details.

This course will provide a general introduction to research in the social sciences and a broad overview of various research methods currently employed in applied linguistics and educational psychology. In addition to the textbook topics, students will critically read example research articles in order to gain familiarity with the presentation of research results, to evaluate the validity and appropriateness of the methods employed, and to become informed about current topics of interest in the field of second language education. Emphasis will be placed on identifying gaps in current knowledge with a view toward generating questions for guiding future research. By the end of this course, participants will develop a clear understanding of the roles of quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-methods research protocols currently employed in second language acquisition research Specific topics to be covered include 1) current ethical standards for research involving human subjects, 2) methods of data collection and organization, 3) coding and interpretation of qualitative data, 4) reliability and validity of quantitative variables, 5) assessing the internal and external validity of various research designs, 6) construction and validation of quantitative variables, and 7) effective integration and cross-validation of qualitative and quantitative approaches. Assessment will based on critical responses to readings, a final project, plus regular short quizzes and data analyses provided through the online course website.

This course is required for the Ph. D. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Trochim, W., Donnelly, J.P., & Arora, K. (2015). Research methods: The essential knowledge base (2nd ed.). Belmont CA: Wadsworth. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp - A kindle edition is also available.)
  • Mackey, A., & Gass M.S. (2015). Second language research: Methodology and design (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp - A kindle edition is also available.)

Recommended Textbook:

  • Brown, J. D (2016). Statistics corner: Questions and answers about language testing statistics. La Vergne,TN: CreateSpace (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com - A kindle edition is also available.)

In addition to the textbook topics, students will critically read example research articles.

Dr. Sick's Class Schedule

Session Day Date Class Time Note
1 Friday September 15, 2017 18:00-21:00  
2 Saturday September 16, 2017 14:00-17:00  
3 Friday September 29, 2017 18:00-21:00  
4 Saturday September 30, 2017 10:00-13:00 Time Changed due to Seminar 2
5 Friday October 13, 2017 18:00-21:00  
6 Saturday October 14, 2017 14:00-17:00  
7 Friday October 27, 2017 18:00-21:00  
8 Saturday October 28, 2017 10:00-13:00 Time Changed due to Seminar 3
9 Friday November 10, 2017 18:00-21:00  
10 Saturday November 11, 2017 14:00-17:00  
11 Friday November 24, 2017 18:00-21:00  
12 Saturday November 25, 2017 14:00-17:00  
13 Friday December 8, 2017 18:00-21:00  
14 Saturday December 9, 2017 14:00-17:00  

EPSY 8825:

Introduction to Education Statistics

Professor:
Dr. Tomoko Nemoto
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
September 8 - December 1
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00 - 21:00
Saturday, 14:00 - 17:00
Check the schedule chart below for more details.

The purpose of the course is to provide an intensive overview of the basic research design and statistical procedures used in second language quantitative research. In the first part of the course, we cover the calculation of descriptive statistics (e.g., mean and standard deviation), nominal, ordinal, and interval scales of measurement, and correlation among different scales of measurement. In the second part of the course, we look at quantitative research designs and how they have been utilized in the field of second language acquisition. This topic leads into a discussion of methods of evaluating quantitative data assumptions of various multivariate techniques and of how common multivariate procedures, the Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) family, correlation analysis, multiple regression models, and factor analysis, are used. Two non-parametric procedures, the one-sample chi-square test, two-way contingency table analysis, and Factor Analysis are introduced. Students have opportunities to become familiar with these statistical techniques through course readings, the critical analysis of published research, and by using statistical computer packages such as SPSS.

This course is required for the Ph. D. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Larson-Hall, J.(2016). A guide to doing statistics in second language research using SPSS and R. (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp - A kindle edition is also available.)

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2009). Publication manual of the American psychological association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp - A kindle edition is also available.)

A set of readings will be available on Blackboard. Students are required to bring in a personal computer with SPSS installed.

Dr. Nemoto's Class Schedule

Session Day Date Class Time Note
1 Friday September 8, 2017 18:00-21:00  
2 Saturday September 9, 2017 14:00-17:00  
3 Friday September 22, 2017 18:00-21:00  
4 Saturday September 23, 2017 10:00-13:00 Time Changed due to Seminar 1
5 Saturday September 23, 2017 14:00-17:00 Students have to attend Dr. Plonsky's seminar (Sat, 9/23 14-17) instead of session 14 (Sat, 12/2)
6 Friday October 6, 2017 18:00-21:00  
7 Saturday October 7, 2017 14:00-17:00  
8 Friday October 20, 2017 18:00-21:00  
9 Saturday October 21, 2017 10:00-13:00 Time changed due to the cancellation of session 11(Fri, 11/17)
10 Saturday October 21, 2017 14:00-17:00  
11 Friday November 3, 2017 18:00-21:00  
12 Saturday November 4, 2017 10:00-13:00 Time changed due to the cancellation of session 12 (Sat,11/18)
13 Saturday November 4, 2017 14:00-17:00  
11 Friday November 17, 2017 18:00-21:00 Class cancellation due to the JALT annual conference. Make-up session is scheduled on Sat,10/21(10-13)
12 Saturday November 18, 2017 14:00-17:00 Class cancellation due to the JALT annual conference. Make-up session is scheduled on Sat,11/4 (10-13)
14 Friday December 1, 2017 18:00-21:00  
14
Saturday
December 2, 2017
14:00-17:00
Class cancellation
Students must attend seminar 1 (Sat, 9/23) in lieu of this class