Course Descriptions (Osaka)

To register for any of the courses below, follow the procedures described in Course Registration. If you already know the process, go to the Registration Form.

Important Notice about Textbooks

To purchase textbooks, click Amazon link below next to each textbook title. In order to get your textbooks in time for the start of the semester, please order them as soon as you register for courses. Make sure to order through the provided Amazon links in this page.

Spring Semester 2018

TESL 5611:

Applied Language Study I

Professor:
Dr. Tomoko Nemoto
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
January 10 - April 11
Day & Time:
Wednesday, 18:00 - 21:00

The primary purpose of this course is to introduce students to the basics of English phonetics and phonology, with an emphasis on areas of interest to language teachers. The course objectives are to: (1) introduce the basic concepts of phonetics and phonology; (2) provide practice in transcribing and analyzing the sound systems of native speakers and learners of English; (3) consider the place of pronunciation teaching in a foreign language curriculum and instructional approaches; (4) examine methods of assessing pronunciation; and (5) look at the relationship between pronunciation and other language skills. Students will complete a number of weekly assignments, take a mid-term examination and final examination, and conduct a project in which the speech of an English language learner is analyzed, a particular aspect of the English sound system is taught, and the results reported.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Celce-Murcia, M., Brinton, D.M., Goodwin, J.M., & Griner, B. (2010). Teaching pronunciation: A course book and reference guide (2nd ed.). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2009). Publication manual of the American psychological association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

A set of readings will be available on Blackboard.

TESL 5616:

Teaching Second and Foreign Language Skills

Professor:
Dr. Paul Leeming
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
January 8 - April 9
Day & Time:
Monday, 18:00-21:00

Students will be required to attend the Dr. Natsuko Shintani seminar, Learning grammar through writing: practice and theory, from January 20th from 14:00-17:00 in lieu of class on April 2nd.

The primary purpose of this course is to allow the participants to consider principles and practices used in the teaching of English to speakers of other languages. The focus of the course will be on pedagogical approaches used to help foreign language learners develop the four language macro skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing, as well as, two linguistic competencies (vocabulary and grammar). Discussion of theoretical issues (how language users process the various macro-skills and how they acquire proficiency in them) and practical issues (e.g., selecting learning materials and activities) will also be covered in class. Course requirements include completing weekly reading assignments, a mid-term examination, a final examination, a course project related to topics and issues introduced in the course, and a short presentation. In addition, students will be required to attend the Dr. Natsuko Shintani seminar, Learning grammar through writing: practice and theory, from January 20th from 14:00-17:00 in lieu of class on April 2nd.

This is a required course for the Master of Science in Education degree in TESOL. It is recommended that students take this course after having completed TESOL 5614 Approaches to Teaching English. Basic computer skills as well as basic knowledge and skills in using Microsoft Word and the Internet are prerequisites for this course.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Brown, H. D., & Lee, H. (2015). Teaching by principles: An interactive approach to language pedagogy. (4th ed.). White Plains, NY: Pearson Education. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)
  • Nation, I. S. P. (2009). Teaching vocabulary: Strategies and techniques. Boston, MA: Heinle Cengage Learning. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)
  • Nation, I. S. P. (2008). Teaching ESL/EFL reading and writing. Oxon, UK: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)
  • Nation, I.S.P., & Newton, J. (2008). Teaching ESL/EFL listening and speaking. Oxon, UK: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2009). Concise rules of APA style (Concise rules of the American psychological association (APA) style) (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

Additional readings will be provided at the beginning of the term and throughout the course.

TESL 5618:

Second Language Acquisition

Professor:
Dr. David Beglar
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
January 11 - April 12
Day & Time:
Thursday, 18:00 - 21:00

The overarching purpose of this course is to canvass eight topics that are central to modern discussions of second language acquisition (SLA) and to thereby provide the participants with an opportunity to further develop and consolidate their understanding of SLA theory, models of language representation and use, and issues that directly affect classroom teaching. In the first part of the course, we look at (a) developmental patterns in SLA, (b) variability in learner language, and (c) input, interaction, and SLA. In the second part of the course, the focus is on (a) language transfer and (b) cognitive accounts of SLA. Finally, in the third part of the course, we read about (a) linguistic universals and SLA, (b) classroom interaction and SLA, and (c) form-focused instruction and SLA. Students will participate in and lead numerous group discussions, keep a running journal of the course readings, and take three in-class examinations.

The course is best taken by students who have already completed TESOL Approaches to Teaching English (TESOL 5614), Teaching Second and Foreign Language Skills (TESOL 5616), and Applied Language Study II (TESOL 5612).

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Ellis, R. (2008). The study of second language acquisition (2nd ed.). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2009). Concise rules of APA style (Concise rules of the American psychological association (APA) style) (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

A set of readings will be available on Blackboard.

ENES 8744:

Individual Differences in Second Language Acquisition

Professor:
Dr. Matthew Apple
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
January 5 - April 6
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00 - 21:00

This course provides an overview of current theory and research into the influence of psychological constructs on foreign language learning. Readings and discussions will center around such important concepts as personality, language aptitude, motivation, and anxiety, among others. In order to further deepen their understanding of these variables and learn how they can be operationalized for future research, students will be given an opportunity to try out and assess research instruments commonly used to measure these constructs. Students will also be encouraged to explore the pedagogical implications of these constructs in order to better understand their role in language learning and how educators can capitalize on these differences in an attempt to more effectively instruct their students. In addition to the main text book, course participants will submit weekly summary assignments of journal articles, lead several in-class group discussions, and write two course papers (one short literature review and one longer research or pedagogical project).

This course can be used as an elective credit for M.S.Ed. and Ed.D./Ph.D.degrees.

Required Textbook:

  • Mercer, S., Ryan, S., & Williams, M. (Eds.) (2012). Psychology for language learning: Insights from research, theory and practice. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

Recommended Textbook:

  • Dörnyei, Z., & Ryan, S. (2015). The psychology of the language learner revisited. Oxon, UK: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)
  • Williams, M., Mercer, S., & Ryan, S. (2016). Exploring psychology in language learning and teaching. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

TESOL Special Projects - Distinguished Lecturer Series

This Lecturer Series will consist of three weekend seminars. Each seminar course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed., Ed.D. and Ph.D. degrees. The first three hours of each seminar (Saturday,14:00 to 17:00) are free and open to the public. Weekend seminars are free for Master's and doctoral graduates of Temple University Japan Campus; the fee for other weekend auditors is ¥13,000.

ENES 8655: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 1):

Learning Grammar through Writing: Practice and Theory

Professor:
Dr. Natsuko Shintani (Kobe Gakuin University, Japan)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, January 20, 14:00 - 21:00
 
Sunday, January 21, 10:00 - 17:00

Two general dimensions of second language (L2) writing are "learning-to-write", where L2 learners learn language to express themselves appropriately in writing, and writing-to-learn", in which engagement with L2 writing contributes to the development of language knowledge. The focus of this seminar is the latter–how writing activities can develop learners’ knowledge of English. The seminar particularly examines how writing activities can develop learners' grammatical knowledge of English by focusing on two major approaches: metalinguistic explanation and written corrective feedback used in a writing activity. I will introduce various strategies to provide metalinguistic explanation and corrective feedback. I will also examine the results of research that has investigated the effects of each strategy. The seminar will conclude with guidance on the use of grammar instruction in second language writing.

ENES 8656: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 2):

Qualitative and Narrative Approaches to Researching Language Teaching and Learning

Professor:
Dr. Gary Barkhuizen (The University of Auckland, New Zealand)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, February 10, 14:00 - 21:00
 
Sunday, February 11, 10:00 - 17:00

What does qualitative research in the field of language teaching and learning actually mean? And what does narrative research mean? How are they related? These are not easy questions to answer, mainly because of the plethora of both definitions and methodological practices evident in the field. This seminar will unpack some of the complications in definition and the actual practice of qualitative and narrative research by going back to basics. Samples of data from actual studies will be used to illustrate a range of methods appropriate to language teacher researchers and researchers in applied linguistics. Traditional qualitative methods of analysis will be covered as well more recent narrative analytical methods, such as narrative frames and short story analysis. Issues of ethics and the reporting of findings in qualitative/narrative research, in which the personal experiences of people are central, will be explored.

ENES 8657: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 3):

Teaching English to Young Learners

Professor:
Dr. Mitsue Allen-Tamai (Aoyama Gakuin University, Japan)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, March 3, 14:00 - 21:00
 
Sunday, March 4, 10:00 - 17:00

The introduction of English education into elementary schools has been much discussed in the last few decades. In order to keep up with the pace of globalization, people in non-English-speaking countries are eager to acquire high levels of communicative English proficiency, while people in English-speaking counties have striven to develop appropriate educational curricula to help young immigrant children learn English. Thus there is a strong social demand for teaching English to young learners throughout the world. However, this strong focus on young learners has not yet occurred in Japan. English will only become a regular subject in Japanese elementary schools in 2020. The Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology (MEXT) has specified the course’s aims and contents a new Course of Study, and MEXT-approved textbooks for upper elementary school children, which will only be used in 2018 and 2019, are now accessible.

This seminar will provide an introduction to the theory and practice in the teaching of English as a second language to young learners, from the ages of three to twelve, focusing especially on English education for Japanese children. The objectives of the course are to develop: (a) an understanding of the psychology of young learners and their language acquisition and (b) a working knowledge of methodologies and classroom practices for teaching English as a second language to young learners.

Doctoral Courses

EDUC 9998:

Dissertation Proposal Writing

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1-3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

This course is for those Ph.D. students who have passed the Qualifying Examination and working on their dissertation proposal.

The Ph.D. students are required to take Culminating Courses (6 semester hours overall, minimum 2 semester hours of EDUC 9999). Culminating Courses: Qualifying Exam Preparation Course (EDUC 9994), Proposal Writing Course (EDUC 9998) and Dissertation Writing Course (EDUC 9999).

ENES 9882 / EPSY 9982:

Graduate Independent Study

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1-3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

This is a one-to-three credit course offered to Ed.D. candidates who are planning or writing dissertations. Consultations will be individual, and appointments will be arranged via e-mail in advance. The main aim of the course is to troubleshoot design, data collection, management, and analysis problems, as well as to encourage substantive progress on dissertation projects.

Students wishing to register for this course should obtain permission from the professor and complete the registration process during the priority or late registration period.

EDUC 9999:

Dissertation Writing

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1-3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

Six credit hours of Education 9999 are required for Ed.D. candidates. The Ph.D. students are required to take Culminating Courses (6 semester hours overall, minimum 2 semester hours of EDUC 9999). Culminating Courses: Qualifying Exam Preparation Course (EDUC 9994), Proposal Writing Course (EDUC 9998) and Dissertation Writing Course (EDUC 9999).

Students wishing to register for this course should obtain permission from the professor and complete the registration process during the registration period.

EDUC 9282:

Research Apprenticeship

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

The Ph.D. students and Ed.D. students who are thinking about graduating with a Ph.D. degree must take two 3-credits Research Apprenticeship courses.

If you wish to take an Apprenticeship course, you first need to write a 300-400-word abstract of your proposed project (unless you are assisting a professor with one of his or her studies). This abstract should include basic information such as (a) the gaps in the literature you are addressing, (b) the purpose(s) of the study, (c) specific research questions, and (d) your methodology, including information about the participants, instruments, procedures, and the analyses you will perform. You will then need to send the abstract to the advisor you wish to work with (Consult the list of Apprenticeship advisors on the registration form to see who is available), and if the advisor approves your plan, you can then register for the course with that advisor.

For Ph.D. 2017 students only

Students in the Ph.D. program are required to take the doctoral seminars listed below.

EDUC 8275:

Introduction to Qualitative Research

Professor:
Dr. Tamara Swenson
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
January 12 - April 7
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00 - 21:00
Saturday, 14:00 - 17:00
Check the schedule chart below for more details.

This course introduces participants to qualitative research methods and related theoretical frameworks used to investigate second language learning. We will begin by reviewing the historical and philosophical roots of qualitative inquiry. We will then examine how different qualitative research approaches have been employed to investigate questions in the field of second language acquisition. Approaches that will be covered include language socialization, the ethnography of communication, interpretive qualitative research, narrative inquiry, critical ethnography, and the analysis of (multimodal) interaction. Theoretical frameworks associated with each of these approaches will be introduced. A major focus of this course will be to consider methodological and ethical issues related to negotiating access, interviewing, observation, data management and analysis, and representation. Building on the class lectures, our readings and discussions, participants will conduct a small scale study to obtain practical experience working within a specific approach to qualitative research in SLA. Course activities will be organized around lectures, group discussions, student presentations, and participants' research projects. Major assignments include a brief summary and presentation of a qualitative study in applied linguistics, and three writing assignments involving data collection, analysis, and a final report on the participants’ research project.

As this course requires participants to negotiate access to and collect data within a research site, participants are strongly encouraged to begin considering what sites are available and what related research topics are of interest to them prior to the start of this course.

This course is required for the Ph. D. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Hatch, J.A. (2002). Doing qualitative research in education settings. New York, NY: State University of New York Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

An additional set of readings will be available at the beginning of the course.

Dr. Swenson's Class Schedule

Session Day Date Class Time Note
1FridayJanuary 12, 201818:00-21:00 
2FridayJanuary 26, 201818:00-21:00 
3SaturdayJanuary 27, 201810:00-13:00*Make-up class for January 13
4SaturdayJanuary 27, 201814:00-17:00 
5FridayFebruary 9, 201818:00-21:00 
6SaturdayFebruary 10, 201810:00-13:00*Time changed due to Seminar II
7FridayFebruary 23, 201818:00-21:00 
8SaturdayFebruary 24, 201814:00-17:00 
9SaturdayMarch 10, 201810:00-13:00*Make-up class for March 9
10SaturdayMarch 10, 201814:00-17:00 
11FridayMarch 23, 201818:00-21:00 
12SaturdayMarch 24, 201814:00-17:00 
13SaturdayApril 7, 201810:00-13:00*Make-up class for April 6
14SaturdayApril 7, 201814:00-17:00 

TESL 8643:

Researching Listening and Speaking

Professor:
Dr. David Beglar
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
January 5 - March 31
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00 - 21:00
Saturday, 14:00 - 17:00
Check the schedule chart below for more details.

The acquisition of listening and speaking skills has formed the heart of the field of second language acquisition since its inception in modern times, and as a result, the majority of the research conducted in the field has been focused on the acquisition of aural-oral skills. The primary purpose of this course is to allow participants to explore theoretical and practical issues concerning the acquisition and teaching of second language listening and speaking skills and to get an overview of the methodological approaches that have been used to investigate these two areas. We will examine theories of language comprehension and production, read and analyze recent research in which listening and/or speaking were investigated, consider how the research that has been conducted to date can be enhanced, and discuss the practical applications of these studies. Course participants will complete weekly homework assignments, analyze and critique previous studies, plan and carry out a small-scale research project investigating an aspect of listening or speaking development, and lead and take part in group discussions. Course participants should read Chapters 1-6 in Teaching and Researching Listening before the first class meeting.

This course is required for the Ph. D. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Rost, M. (2016). Teaching and researching listening (3rd ed.). New York, NY: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

An additional set of readings will be available at the beginning of the course.

Dr. Beglar's Class Schedule

Session Day Date Class Time Note
1FridayJanuary 5, 201818:00-21:00 
2SaturdayJanuary 6, 201814:00-17:00 
3FridayJanuary 19, 201818:00-21:00 
4SaturdayJanuary 20, 201810:00-13:00*Time changed due to Seminar I
5FridayFebruary 2, 201818:00-21:00 
6SaturdayFebruary 3, 201814:00-17:00*Cancelled. The make-up class schedule will be determined later in the class.
7FridayFebruary 16, 201818:00-21:00 
8SaturdayFebruary 17, 201814:00-17:00 
9FridayMarch 2, 201818:00-21:00 
10SaturdayMarch 3, 201810:00-13:00*Time changed due to Seminar III
11FridayMarch 16, 201818:00-21:00 
12SaturdayMarch 17, 201814:00-17:00 
13FridayMarch 30, 201818:00-21:00 
14SaturdayMarch 31, 201814:00-17:00