Course Descriptions (Osaka)

To register for any of the courses below, follow the procedures described in Course Registration. If you already know the process, go to the Registration Form.

Important Notice about Textbooks

To purchase textbooks, click Amazon link below next to each textbook title. In order to get your textbooks in time for the start of the semester, please order them as soon as you register for courses. Make sure to order through the provided Amazon links in this page.

Summer Semester 2018 Session I

FLED 5470:

Introduction to the Study of TESOL

Professor:
Dr. Donna Fujimoto
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 9 - August 8
Day & Time:
Wednesday, 18:00-21:00

The primary purposes of this course are: (a) to help new students develop the special skills that they will need to succeed in the M.S.Ed. program, and (b) to provide an overview of the field of TESOL before the new students will further explore the M.S. Ed. program.

The course will focus on: (1) Academic skills development (TU Portal and library use, reading, organizing notes, discussion, writing definitions, summaries, and essays, presentation, and test taking); (2) Overview of theories in TESOL; (3) Overview of foreign language teaching approaches; (4) The technical terms in TESOL; and (5) APA writing style.

The course is designed for students who are new to the M.S.Ed. program, who have little or no experience studying in an English-language university, or who are not familiar with formal academic reading, writing, discussion, presentation, and test taking. The course is not designed for students who have already taken some other courses in the program though the course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Lightbown, P. M., & Spada, N. (2013). How languages are learned (Oxford handbooks for language teachers). (4 th ed.). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2009). Publication manual of the American psychological association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)
  • Richards, J. C., & Schmidt, R. (2010). Longman dictionary of language teaching and applied Linguistics. (4 th ed.). Oxon, UK: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

ENES 8645:

Adapting and Developing Language Teaching Materials

Professor:
Dr. David Beglar
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 8 - June 21
Day & Time:
Tuesday & Thursday, 18:00-21:00

High quality language teaching materials are a critical component of any language teaching program. Although textbooks published by major publishers have undergone noticeable improvements in the past four decades, the fact remains that commercially produced materials are designed to be used with a wide variety of learners who often reside in different countries and speak different native languages. For this reason, many instructors find it difficult to find texts that are appropriate for their specific teaching situations. The purpose of this course is to allow students to (a) explore the options available in terms of commercially-produced texts, (b) learn to analyze the strengths and weaknesses of those texts in the light of research on successful second language acquisition, (c) consider how commercially-produced texts can be usefully adapted to specific situations, and (d) plan and produce original materials in an area of their choice (e.g., listening, speaking, reading, or writing). Topics that will be covered in the course include (a) selecting principles for evaluating and producing pedagogical materials, (b) specifying goals and objectives at the levels of curriculum and task, (c) enhancing affective factors such as motivation and confidence, and (d) using strategies for effective page layout.

Students taking this course will be required to actively participate in weekly class activities and produce a final course project of an adapted or completely original teaching unit and a description of the theoretical and/or researched-based underpinnings of those materials. Course participants should read Chapters 1-5 in the textbook before the first class session.

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees.

Required Textbook:

  • Wiggins, G., & McTighe, J. (2006). Understanding by design (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, N. J.: Pearson Education, Inc. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)
  • Wiggins, G., & McTighe, J. (2011). The understanding by design guide to creating high-quality units. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

ENES 8734:

Conversational Analysis: Applications and Implications for the Language Classroom

Professor:
Dr. Donna Fujimoto
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 8 - June 22
Day & Time:
Tuesday & Friday, 18:00-21:00

This course has been cancelled.

This course is an introduction to the methodology and perspective of Conversation Analysis (CA). Students will learn the basic CA concepts, the CA-specific terminology, and the CA transcription conventions. CA clearly specifies that data to be analyzed must be naturally occurring interactions, and these fall into two main categories: a) institutional discourse, which can include doctor-patient discourse, courtroom interactions, talk in the classroom, etc. and b) mundane interactions, which can involve dinner conversations, interactions among friends, children's talk, and almost any kind of conversation that takes place in ordinary life.

This course has a demanding reading requirement coupled with related written assignments. Students will be required to record actual interactions and then make detailed transcriptions of this talk. They will share their transcripts and recordings in class and will be asked to make in-depth observations about these excerpts. CA methodology takes an emic approach, and therefore students will be asked to take the insider's view-the participant's perspective. CA analysis attempts to uncover the organization of people's interactions and to articulate the tacit rules and procedures underlying these actions. By closely examining a variety of interactional practices, students will be able to discover applications and implications related to language classroom practices.

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees.

Required Textbook:

  • Wong, J., & Waring, H. Z. (2010). Conversation analysis and second language pedagogy: A guide for ESL/EFL teachers. New York, NY: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)
  • Hutchby, I., & Wooffitt, R. (2008). Conversation analysis (2nd ed.). Cambridge, UK: Polity. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

Summer Semester 2018 Session II

FLED 5470:

Introduction to the Study of TESOL

Professor:
Dr. Donna Fujimoto
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 9 - August 8
Day & Time:
Wednesday, 18:00-21:00

Continued from Summer Session I.

ENES 8654:

Teaching and Learning Vocabulary

Professor:
Dr. David Beglar
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
June 25 - August 8
Day & Time:
Monday & Wednesday, 18:00-21:00

The course is focused on teaching, learning, and researching vocabulary - single words and multi-word units - in a second language. In this course, we will look at a wide range of vocabulary research topics, such as what is involved in knowing a word; how much vocabulary is needed when using the four major skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing; acquiring and using specialized vocabulary; learning words from context; using dictionaries effectively, and; learning multi-word units. The course has two primary aims. The first aim is for participants to become more familiar with the wide variety of research that makes up the field of second language vocabulary acquisition. The second aim, which rests on the foundation provided by the first aim, is to develop the knowledge and skills necessary to create an effective plan for teaching vocabulary in a course or in a foreign-language curriculum.

Course participants will be read extensively, complete in-class tasks regarding vocabulary teaching and learning, participate in small group discussions, lead some of those discussions, write two course papers, and make an in-class presentation about the course project. By the end of the course, course participants should be aware of the major issues pertinent to teaching, learning, and researching second-language vocabulary, be able to design a vocabulary component for a language course, advise teachers and learners on vocabulary learning strategies, and design a research project focusing on some aspect of second-language vocabulary learning or teaching. Course participants should read the first four chapters in both textbooks before the first class meeting.

This course can be used as elective credits for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees.

Required Textbook:

  • Nation, I.S.P. (2013). Learning vocabulary in another language (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Routledge. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)
  • Nation, I.S.P. (2008). Teaching vocabulary — strategies and techniques. Boston, MA: Heinle ELT. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

EPSY 8625:

Introduction to Ressearch Methodology

Professor:
Dr. Steven Ross
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
June 26 - August 9
Day & Time:
Tuesday & Thursday, 18:00-21:00

The course will introduce the fundamentals of research design and analysis for hypothetical-deductive research in applied linguistics and SLA. The course presupposes no prior experience conducting research, data analysis, or any knowledge of statistics. The initial focus will be on sampling, randomization, and intervening variables, as well as how statistical controls can be built into research designs. We will review research designs common in used in studies of language learning, including factors that affect internal and external validity. Focus will be put on experimental and quasi-experimental designs, and the fundamentals of data analysis such as the basics of measurement, cross-tabulation of frequencies, correlations among variables, simple and multiple regression designs, regression discontinuity, regression point displacement, exploratory factor analysis, common approaches to group comparisons using various kinds of t-tests, and analysis of variance and covariance. Students will also have the opportunity to compare frequentist statistical inference with the Bayesian alternative. The course will be primarily hands on, with weekly data analysis practice.

Students are required to have JASP (downloadable free).

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees.

Required Textbook:

  • Trochim, W. M. K., & Donnelly, J. P. (2006). The research methods knowledge base (3rd Ed.). Boston, MA: Cengage Learning. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp, e-book (2006) is also available)

TESOL Special Projects - Distinguished Lecturer Series

This Lecturer Series will consist of three weekend seminars. Each seminar course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed., Ed.D. and Ph.D. degrees. The first three hours of each seminar (Saturday,14:00 to 17:00) are free and open to the public. Weekend seminars are free for Master's and doctoral graduates of Temple University Japan Campus; the fee for other weekend auditors is ¥13,000.

ENES 8655: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 1):

Task-based Language Teaching and Learning

Professor:
Dr. Andrea Révész (University College London, U.K.)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, June 23, 14:00-21:00
 
Sunday, June 24, 10:00-17:00

Task-based language teaching (TBLT) is an increasingly popular approach to second and foreign language education across the globe. Based on insights from the fields of general education, second language (L2) acquisition research and L2 pedagogy, TBLT uses communicative tasks as the defining unit for L2 curriculum and syllabus design. In this seminar, we will first discuss theoretical, empirical and practical rationales for task-based language learning and teaching. Then, we will review some key steps involved in the development of task-based curricula, from carrying out a task-based needs analysis to deriving and sequencing pedagogic tasks, implementing task-based syllabuses and assessing student performance. Throughout the course, we will draw on recent research on TBLT, and consider how TBLT principles can be applied in various educational contexts.

ENES 8656: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 2):

Teaching and Learning Vocabulary

Professor:
Professor. Paul Nation (Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, July 7, 14:00-21:00
 
Sunday, July 8, 10:00-17:00

This course looks at the role played by direct learning and meaning focused activities in the teaching and learning of vocabulary. It examines the statistical nature of vocabulary and research-based principles of vocabulary learning in order to help teachers plan the vocabulary learning component of language courses. By the end of the course, course members should be able to discuss some of the important current issues in teaching and learning vocabulary, describe important areas for research in vocabulary, comment critically on research and practice, design the vocabulary component of a language course, and advise teachers and learners on vocabulary learning.

Required Textbook:

  • Webb, S. & Nation, I.S.P. (2017). How vocabulary is learned. Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp, e-book also available)

Recommended Textbook:

For additional reading, the following text provides a clear and easily accessible overview of foreign language teaching methodology.

  • Nation, I.S.P. (2013). What should every EFL teacher know? Seoul: Compass Publishing. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp, e-book also available)

ENES 8657: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 3):

Lexical Input Processing, the TOPRA Model, and Effective Vocabulary Instruction

Professor:
Dr. Joe Barcroft (Washington University in St. Louis, U.S.A.).
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, July 21, 14:00-21:00
 
Sunday, July 22, 10:00-17:00

This seminar focuses on (a) lexical input processing (lex-IP), referring to how learners allocate their limited processing resources when they are exposed to novel vocabulary; (b) the type of processing - resource allocation (TOPRA) model and its predictions for how different types of tasks and input manipulations affect vocabulary learning; and (c) implications of research on lex IP and TOPRA when it comes to vocabulary instruction. The seminar reviews studies on a range of tasks, including writing target words in sentences, copying target words, and attempting to retrieve target words, as well as studies on different ways of structuring input, such as by increasing repetition of target words or increasing the amount of acoustic variability used when presenting target words in spoken input. The findings of these studies have practical implications that have been incorporated in the effective input-based incremental (IBI) approach to vocabulary instruction, which is the focus of the final portion of the seminar. Students in the seminar complete projects that include original IBI lessons along with commentary on how theory and research inform instructional practice in this area.

Doctoral Courses

EDUC 9998:

Dissertation Proposal Writing

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1-3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

This course is for those Ph.D. students who have passed the Qualifying Examination and working on their dissertation proposal.

The Ph.D. students are required to take Culminating Courses (6 semester hours overall, minimum 2 semester hours of ED 9999). Culminating Courses: Qualifying Exam Preparation Course (ED9994), Proposal Writing Course (ED9998) and Dissertation Writing Course (ED9999).

EDUC 9999:

Dissertation Writing

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1-3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

Six credit hours of Education 9999 are required for the Doctor of Education degree.

Students wishing to register for this course should obtain permission from the professor and complete the registration process during the registration period.

EDUC 9282:

Research Apprenticeship

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement (Summer I through Summer II)

Ph.D. students are required to take two 3-credit Research Apprenticeship courses.

If you wish to take an apprenticeship course, you first need to write a 300-400-word abstract of your proposed project (unless you are assisting a professor with one of his or her studies). This abstract should include basic information such as (a) the gaps in the literature you are addressing, (b) the purpose(s) of the study, (c) specific research questions, and (d) your methodology, including information about the participants, instruments, procedures, and the analyses you will perform. You will then need to send the abstract to the advisor you wish to work with (Consult the list of Apprenticeship advisors on the registration form to see who is available), and if the advisor approves your plan, you can then register for the course with that advisor.

For Ph.D. 2017 students only

Students in the Ph.D. program are required to take the doctoral seminars listed below.

EPSY 8826:

Intermediate Educational Statistics

Professor:
Dr. Steven Ross
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 25 - August 18
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00-21:00
Saturday, 14:00-17:00
Check the schedule chart below for more details.

The intermediate statistics course will build from the foundations laid in the introductory statistics course. The course will review the fundamentals of research design with an emphasis on designs that optimize internal and external validity. Students will review common designs used in applied linguistics research, with a particular focus on sampling, randomization, and intervening variables, as well as how statistical controls are built into designs. The intermediate course will in particular aim to build and expand students' expertise in using SPSS and JASP by extending their repertoire of quantitative analysis techniques including multiple linear regression, analysis of residuals, binary and multinomial logistic regression, discriminant function analysis, univariate and multivariate analysis of variance models, analysis of covariance, factorial repeated measures, multivariate analysis of variance models, and time series regression models. We will also explore Bayesian inference using the freeware JASP. This course will establish a springboard from which participants can extend into more advanced research methods such as event history analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, multilevel and mixed effects models, structural equation modeling, and growth curve modeling. Selected exemplars from the research literature as well as a core text will be utilized.

SPSS Grad Pack and JASP (free) are required for this course.

This course is required for the Ph. D. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Field, A. (2009). Discovering statistics using SPSS (3rd ed.). London, UK: SAGE Publications. Ltd. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

Dr. Ross's Class Schedule

Session Day Date Class Time Note
1FridayMay 25, 201818:00-21:00 
2SaturdayMay 26, 201814:00-17:00 
3FridayJune 8, 201818:00-21:00 
4SaturdayJune 9, 201814:00-17:00 
5FridayJune 22, 201818:00-21:00 
6SaturdayJune 23, 201810:00-13:00*Time changed due to seminar 1
7FridayJuly 6, 201818:00-21:00 
8SaturdayJuly 7, 201810:00-13:00*Time changed due to seminar 2
9FridayJuly 20, 201818:00-21:00 
10SaturdayJuly 21, 201810:00-13:00*Time changed due to seminar 3
11FridayAugust 3, 201818:00-21:00 
12SaturdayAugust 4, 201814:00-17:00 
13FridayAugust 17, 201818:00-21:00 
14SaturdayAugust 18, 201814:00-17:00 

TESL 8626:

Researching Reading and Writing

Professor:
Dr. Robert Nelson
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
May 18 - August 11
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00-21:00
Saturday, 14:00-17:00
Check the schedule chart below for more details.

This course offers an overview of the underlying concepts and skills needed for research in ESL and EFL literacy development. Students will acquire fluency in the current best practices for the research in reading and writing in English as a Foreign/Second/Other Language as well as learner text/corpus linguistics in general. In addition to surveying current research methods, students will also become familiar with the theory behind the various current methods for planning, implementing, and assessing reading and writing instruction for all levels of ESL/EFL students, from pre-literacy to academic skills. This class will rely primarily on the academic literature to ensure the timeliness of the methods discussed. The overarching goal of the class is for students to acquire a familiarity with research methods sufficient to enable them to make novel contributions; however, we will review some current issues in pedagogy, focusing on those that are in need of greater empirical support (e.g., the written corrective feedback debate). Specific topics will include reading comprehension, vocabulary development, the psycholinguistics of reading, the nature of academic literacy, the writing process, the effectiveness of written feedback, the social and institutional contexts of ESL/EFL reading and writing and reading and writing assessment. We will also focus on practical techniques in corpus and text linguistics, which will require the student to gain some facility with the R language and the R studio development environment. Assignments will include research proposals complete with thorough design, compilation and analysis of learner corpus data, and various R projects.

This course is required for the Ph. D. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Chen, X., Dronjic, V., & Helms-Park, R (2016). Reading in a second language: Cognitive and psycholinguistic issues. New York, NY: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)
  • Han, Z., & Anderson, N. J (2009). Second language reading research and instruction: Crossing the boundaries. Ann Arber, MI: University of Michigan Press (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)
  • Matsuda, P. K., & Silva, T. (2011). Second language writing research: Perspectives on the process of knowledge construction. New York, NY: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp, e-book (2014) is also available)
  • Gries, S. T. (2009). Quantitative corpus linguistics with R: A practical introduction. New York, NY: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

Dr. Nelson's Class Schedule

Session Day Date Class Time Note
1FridayMay 18, 201818:00-21:00 
2SaturdayMay 19, 201814:00-17:00 
3FridayJune 1, 201818:00-21:00 
4SaturdayJune 2, 201814:00-17:00 
5FridayJune 15, 201818:00-21:00 
6SaturdayJune 16, 201814:00-17:00 
7FridayJune 29, 201818:00-21:00 
8SaturdayJune 30, 201814:00-17:00 
9FridayJuly 13, 201818:00-21:00 
10SaturdayJuly 14, 201814:00-17:00 
11FridayJuly 27, 201818:00-21:00 
12SaturdayJuly 28, 201814:00-17:00 
13FridayAugust 10, 201818:00-21:00 
14SaturdayAugust 11, 201814:00-18:00