Course Descriptions (Osaka)

To register for any of the courses below, follow the procedures described in Course Registration. If you already know the process, go to the Registration Form.

Important Notice about Textbooks

To purchase textbooks, click Amazon link below next to each textbook title. Amazon has secured some copies of each required book especially for TUJ students to order. In order to get your textbooks in time for the start of the semester, please order them as soon as you register for courses. Make sure to order through the provided Amazon links in this page.

Spring Semester 2017

FLED 5470:

Introduction to the Study of TESOL

This course has been canceled.

Professor:
Dr. Tamara Swenson
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
January 12 - April 13
Day & Time:
Thursday, 18:00 - 21:00

Class on March 9 & April 6 (Thursdays) will be cancelled. There will be make-up classes on February 18 & February 25 (Saturdays) from 10:00 to 13:00.

The primary purposes of this course are: (a) to help new students develop the skills that they will need to succeed in the M.S.Ed. program, and (b) to provide an overview of the field of TESOL before they further explore the field within the M.S. Ed. program. The course will focus on:

  1. Providing an overview of core theories in TESOL, understanding foreign language teaching approaches, and learning key technical terms in TESOL;
  2. Developing academic skills (e.g., using TU Portal and the TU library; reading and organizing notes, participating in academic discussions; writing definitions, summaries, and essays, making presentations; and test taking, particularly essays under timed testing conditions); and
  3. Improving knowledge of the APA (American Psychological Association) writing style and applying this style appropriately.

The course is designed for students who are new to the M.S.Ed. program, who have had little or no experience studying in an English-language university, or who are not familiar with formal academic reading, writing, discussion, presentation, and test taking. The course is not designed for students who have already taken other courses in the program though the course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Lightbown, P. M., & Spada, N. (2013). How Languages Are Learned (Oxford Handbooks for Language Teachers) (4th ed.). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2009). Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)
  • Richards, J. C., & Schmidt, R. (2010). Longman Dictionary of Language Teaching and Applied Linguistics (4th ed.). Oxon, UK: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

TESL 5611:

Applied Language Study I

Professor:
Dr. Donna Tatsuki
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
January 5 - April 13
Day & Time:
Thursday, 18:00-21:00

There is no class on Thursday, March 30. Students will be required to attend Dr. Pavel Trofimovich seminar, Second language Pronunciation for Successful Communication: Research Evidence and Practical Implications from 14:00-17:00 on Saturday, February 25th in lieu of class on Thursday, March 30.

This is an introduction to English phonetics and phonology, with an emphasis on areas of interest to language teachers. The course objectives are: 1) to introduce the basic concepts of phonetics and phonology; 2) to provide practice in transcribing and analyzing the sound system of native speakers and learners of English; 3) to examine theoretical and practical aspects of the teaching pronunciation, with a focus on Japanese learners of English.

Emphasis will be on consonant and vowel articulation, intonation, stress, contextual alterations and rhythm. Students will also become familiar with theories of acquisition of sounds and their practical realization in the speech of non-native speakers.

Requirements: Students will complete an number of weekly assignments (details will be provided at the first class meeting), a mid-term examination, a final examination, a project in which students will design a series of pronunciation teaching activities to aid non-native speakers in acquiring a language and a 10-minute course project presentation.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

Recommended Textbook:

  • Celce-Murcia, M., Brinton, D.M., Goodwin, J.M., & Griner, B. (2010) Teaching Pronunciation: A Course Book and Reference Guide (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Cambridge University Press. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)
  • American Psychological Association. (2009). Concise Rules of APA Style (Concise Rules of the American Psychological Association (APA) Style) (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

Professor will also provide other optional/suggested readings later.

TESL 5616:

Teaching Second and Foreign Language Skills

Professor:
Dr. Paul Leeming
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
January 6 - April 7
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00-21:00

The primary purpose of this course is to allow the participants to consider principles and practices used in the teaching of English to speakers of other languages. The focus of the course will be on pedagogical approaches used to help foreign language learners develop the four language macro skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing, as well as, two linguistic competencies (vocabulary and grammar). Discussion of theoretical issues (how language users process the various macro-skills and how they acquire proficiency in them) and practical issues (e.g., selecting learning materials and activities) will also be covered in class. Course requirements include completing weekly reading assignments, a mid-term examination, a final examination, a course project related to topics and issues introduced in the course, and a 20-minute presentation. In addition, students will be required to attend Dr. Pavel Trofimovich seminar, Second Language Pronunciation for Successful Communication: Research Evidence and Practical Implications from 14:00-17:00 on Saturday, February 25th in lieu of class on Friday, March 31st.

This is a required course for the Master of Science in Education degree in TESOL. It is recommended that students take this course after having completed TESL 5614 Approaches to Teaching English. Basic computer skills as well as basic knowledge and skills in using Microsoft Word and the Internet are prerequisites for this course.

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

  • Brown, H. D., & Lee, H. (2015). Teaching by Principles: An Interactive Approach to Language Pedagogy (4th ed.). White Plains, NY: Pearson Education. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)
  • Nation, I. S. P. (2008). Teaching Vocabulary: Strategies and Techniques. Boston, MA: Heinle Cengage Learning. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)
  • Nation, I. S. P. (2009). Teaching ESL/EFL Reading and Writing. New York, NY: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)
  • Nation, I. S. P., & Newton, J. (2009). Teaching ESL/EFL Listening and Speaking. New York, NY: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2009). Concise Rules of APA Style (Concise Rules of the American Psychological Association (APA) Style) (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

Additional readings will be provided at the beginning of the term and throughout the course.

TESL 5618:

Second Language Acquisition

Professor:
Dr. David Beglar
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
January 4 - April 6
Day & Time:
Wednesday, 18:00 - 21:00 

The overarching purpose of this course is to canvass eight topics that are central to modern discussions of second language acquisition (SLA) and to thereby provide the participants with an opportunity to further develop and consolidate their understanding of SLA theory, models of language representation and use, and issues that directly affect classroom teaching. In the first part of the course, we look at (a) developmental patterns in SLA, (b) variability in learner language, and (c) input, interaction, and SLA. In the second part of the course, the focus is on (a) language transfer and (b) cognitive accounts of SLA. Finally, in the third part of the course, we read about (a) linguistic universals and SLA, (b) classroom interaction and SLA, and (c) form-focused instruction and SLA. Students will participate in and lead numerous group discussions, keep a running journal of the course readings, and take three in-class examinations.

This course is required for the Master of Science in Education degree.

The course is best taken by students who have already completed TESOL Approaches to Teaching English (TESL 5614), Teaching Second and Foreign Language Skills (TESL 5616), and Applied Language Study II (TESL 5612).

This course is required for the M.S.Ed. degree.

Required Textbook:

Recommended Textbook:

  • American Psychological Association. (2009). Concise Rules of APA Style (Concise Rules of the American Psychological Association (APA) Style) (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

A set of readings will be available on Blackboard.

ENES 8654:

Teaching Listening and Speaking

Professor:
Prof. Tim Doe
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
January 9 - April 17
Day & Time:
Monday, 18:00 - 21:00

The main focus of this course will be to link current theories of second language comprehension and production to the design, creation, and implementation of listening and speaking courses. We will examine theories of language comprehension and production, with a focus on identifying how higher and lower level proficiency learners may differ in their abilities to process and use language. The course will also investigate how L2 listening and speaking research can inform teaching and assessment practices. Specifically, we will examine a variety of practical approaches to teaching including: meaning-focused input and output; language-focused learning; fluency development; extensive listening; creative automatization; task-based language teaching and focus on form; formative assessment; and affective variables such as motivation and willingness to communicate. Finally, we will analyze and evaluate specific activities designed to develop or assess speaking and listening skills.

The course will take a hands-on approach to exploring how instruction can aid the development of oral production and/or interaction skills. Students will complete a short research paper in which they will plan and implement a theoretically based approach to the teaching of second language speaking, analyze the language their learner(s) produce during instruction, and evaluate their selected approach.

This course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed. and Ed.D./Ph.D. degrees.

Required Textbook:

  • Rost, M. (2016). Teaching and Researching: Listening (Applied Linguistics in Action) (3rd ed.). Oxon, UK: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

Additional readings will be provided.

TESOL Special Projects - Distinguished Lecturer Series

This Lecturer Series will consist of three weekend seminars. Each seminar course can be used as elective credit for the M.S.Ed., Ed.D. and Ph.D. degrees. The first three hours of each seminar (Saturday,14:00 to 17:00) are free and open to the public. Weekend seminars are free for Master’s and doctoral graduates of Temple University Japan Campus; the fee for other weekend auditors is ¥13,000.

ENES 8655: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 1):

Emotion in SLA and in Multilingual Talk

Professor:
Dr. Gabriele Kasper (University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, U.S.A.)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, January 28, 14:00 - 21:00
 
Sunday, January 29, 10:00 - 17:00

Emotion or affect have been research concerns in SLA since its inception. Current studies on the topic fall into two broad strands: emotion as a complex of individual difference variables that help or hinder second language learning, and emotion as forms of meaning that multilingual speakers understand and produce in talk, text, and multisemiotic spaces. Under the second perspective, being able to understand and convey emotion is an integral part of communicative and interactional competence. The seminar will introduce students to the major theoretical and methodological approaches to emotion in these traditions. Focus will be given to the discursive practices through which L2 speakers and their interlocutors manage emotion in different activities and settings.

The seminar will include lectures, discussions, and data analyses in groups and plenary, and offer students initial training in conducting research on emotion in multilingual language use and development.

Required Textbook:

A reading package (PDFs) will be made available to students who take the course for credit. These students are asked to read Ch. 1 in Emotion in Multilingual Interaction before class.

Recommended Textbook:

  • Prior, M. T., & Kasper, G. (Eds.). (2016). Emotion in Multilingual Interaction. Amsterdam, NLD: John Benjamins Publishing Company. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp)

ENES 8656: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 2):

English for Academic Purposes: Looking Closely at the ‘E’ and the ‘A’ in EAP

Professor:
Dr. Averil Coxhead (Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, February 18, 14:00 - 21:00
 
Sunday, February 19, 10:00 - 17:00

English for Academic Purposes (EAP) is a major area of research, teaching, and materials design internationally, under the umbrella of English for Specific Purposes. This course is entitled English for Academic Purposes: Looking Closely at the ‘E’ and the ‘A’ in EAP because its key concern is the nature of academic English. This course draws on theory and research on a variety of aspects of language and English for Academic Purposes and links them to classroom practice. The first session focuses on five key issues in the ‘E’ and the ‘A’ in EAP across EAP in several contexts, from secondary school through to university studies and beyond. Sessions Two and Three concentrate on academic vocabulary, from single words to multi-word units. Session Four moves to academic discourse, and Sessions Five and Six focus on written and spoken academic language. Session Seven is concerned with materials in EAP, particularly in light of the findings of research presented in the earlier sessions. The final session looks at assessment and ends with overall considerations for the future of theory and practice in the ‘E’ and the ‘A’ of EAP.

ENES 8657: Distinguished Lecturer Series (Seminar 3):

Second Language Pronunciation for Successful Communication: Research Evidence and Practical Implications

Professor:
Dr. Pavel Trofimovich (Concordia University, Canada)
Credit hours:
1 credit hour
Schedule:
Saturday, February 25, 14:00 - 21:00
 
Sunday, February 26, 10:00 - 17:00

A common belief in the field of second language speech learning is that successful communication (generally measured through mutual understanding achieved by interlocutors) should be prioritized over matters of linguistic accuracy or nativelikeness, especially if learners’ goal is to communicate successfully in academic and workplace settings. In this seminar, we will critically examine second language intelligibility, comprehensibility, and accentedness as constructs central to this argument, with reference to current research and pedagogical practices.

Although intelligible and comprehensible second language speech appears to be a straightforward target attainable by most learners, these are complex phenomena linked to cognitive, social, and experiential factors, both for the speaker and the listener. Through discussions of published empirical research and hands-on analyses of learner language, we will explore the challenges of achieving intelligible and comprehensible second language speech from meta-cognitive, linguistic, social, affective, and assessment perspectives and will discuss implications of research on intelligibility and comprehensibility for the teaching and learning of second language pronunciation.

Required Textbook:

If you would like to get a paper copy, print copies should be available from Dec. 15th. The 50% discount voucher off the advertised price for those who still want a hard copy (code: PREORDER50) will be available at the publisher's website until the end of March.

Doctoral Courses

ENES 9882/ EPSY 9982:

Graduate Independent Study

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1-3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

This is a one-to-three credit course offered to doctoral candidates who are planning or writing dissertations. Consultations will be individual, and appointments will be arranged via e-mail in advance. The main aim of the course is to troubleshoot design, data collection, management, and analysis problems, as well as to encourage substantive progress on dissertation projects.

Students wishing to register for this course should obtain permission from the professor and complete the registration process during the priority or late registration period.

EDUC 9999:

Dissertation Writing

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
1-3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

Six credit hours of Education 9999 are required for Ed.D./Ph.D.degrees.

Students wishing to register for this course should obtain permission from the professor and complete the registration process during the registration period.

EDUC 9282:

Research Apprenticeship

Professor:
By Arrangement
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Schedule:
By Arrangement

Required course for the Ph.D. students. Ed.D. students who are thinking about graduating with a Ph.D. degree must take two 3-credit Research Apprenticeship courses.

If you wish to take an Apprenticeship course, you first need to write a 300-400-word abstract of your proposed project (unless you are assisting a professor with one of his or her studies). This abstract should include basic information such as (a) the gaps in the literature you are addressing, (b) the purpose(s) of the study, (c) specific research questions, and (d) your methodology, including information about the participants, instruments, procedures, and the analyses you will perform.

You will then need to send the abstract to the advisor you wish to work with (Consult the list of Apprenticeship advisors on the registration form to see who is available), and if the advisor approves your plan, you can then register for the course with that advisor.

For Ph.D. candidates only

Students in the Ph.D. program are required to take the doctoral seminars listed below.

EPSY 8827:

Dissertation Proposal Writing

Professor:
Dr. David Beglar
Credit hours:
3 credit hours
Dates:
January 13 - April 8
Day & Time:
Friday, 18:00 - 21:00
Saturday, 14:00 - 17:00
Check the schedule chart below for more details.

The primary goal of this course is to familiarize participants with the requirements and organization of quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-methods doctoral dissertations at Temple University by closely analyzing the formal macro-organization of doctoral dissertations as well as more detailed aspects of individual dissertation chapters and sections. Accomplishing this goal involves looking closely at (a) the dissertation abstract, (b) the introductory chapter, (c) the construction of an effective academic literature review, (d) the organization and content of a methodology chapter, with a particular emphasis on research design, (e) the reporting of quantitative and qualitative results, (f) and APA formatting and writing conventions. Course participants will meet with the instructor outside of the class to discuss their proposed study and to make progress reports, discuss course readings in small groups, analyze published research papers, make multiple small-group presentations on various aspects of their proposed dissertation study, and submit multiple short papers that feed directly into the ultimate goal of the course: the production of a well-organized and complete dissertation proposal that can be successfully defended in the following academic year.

Required Textbook:

  • Murray, N., & Beglar, D. (2009). Inside Track: Writing Dissertations and Theses. White Plains, NY: Pearson Education. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp - A kindle edition is also available.)
  • American Psychological Association. (2009). Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.).Washington, DC: Author. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp - A kindle edition is also available.)
  • Galvan, J. L. (2014). Writing Literature Reviews: A Guide for Students of the Social and Behavioral Sciences. (6th ed.). Oxon, UK: Routledge. (Buy on Amazon.co.jp / Buy on Amazon.com)

Dr. Beglar's Class Schedule

Session Day Date Class Time Note
1 Friday January 13, 2017 18:00-21:00  
2 Saturday January 14, 2017 14:00-17:00  
3 Friday January 27, 2017 18:00-21:00  
4 Saturday January 28, 2017 10:00-13:00 *Time Changed due to Seminar I
5 Friday February 10, 2017 18:00-21:00  
6 Saturday February 11, 2017 14:00-17:00  
7 Friday February 24, 2017 18:00-21:00  
8 Saturday February 25, 2017 10:00-13:00 *Time Changed due to Seminar III
9 Friday March 10, 2017 18:00-21:00  
10 Saturday March 11, 2017 10:00-13:00 *Time Change due to Seminar II
11 Friday March 24, 2017 18:00-21:00  
12 Saturday March 25, 2017 14:00-17:00  
13 Friday April 07, 2017 18:00-21:00  
14 Saturday April 08, 2017 14:00-17:00