Temple University, Japan Campus 20th Anniversary Distinguished Lecturer Series (June 2002)

June 29, 2002

Temple University, Japan Campus (Minato-ku, Tokyo, campus) is hosting a weekend lecture and seminar presentation as part of its Distinguished Lecture Series. This is a special project on behalf of and by the TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) Program. The first three hours of the weekend are free and open to the public. Those wishing to attend beyond the first three hours are required to pay 10,500 yen.

Lecturer: Dr. Stephen Krashen (University of Southern California)

Topic
English as a Foreign Language: Current Controversies and Conjectures
Dates
Saturday, July 6, 2002, 2:00-9:00pm
Sunday, July 7, 10:00am-5:00pm
Place
Temple University, Japan Campus (Minami-Azabu, Minato-ku)

The lecture opens with a brief overview of the overwhelming evidence for the Input (or Comprehension) Hypothesis and the lack of evidence supporting its two major rivals: the Skill-Building Hypothesis and the Comprehensible Output Hypothesis.

Next, the lecture focuses on an idea for which there is little evidence but that promises to contribute greatly to EFL theory and practice: Sheltered Popular Literature.

To conclude, the lecture's focus shifts to a conjecture for which there is practically no evidence but that is almost certainly true: That language acquisition, when natural, is not only pleasant but at least mildly ecstatic.

Seminars during the weekend are devoted to the following topics: The Acquisition-Learning Distinction; The Case for Free Voluntary Reading (FVR); How Reading and Writing Make You Smarter (or How Smart People Read and Write); and Current Issues and Controversies (and Conjectures).

Directions: Temple University, Japan Campus, 2-8-12, Minami Azabu, Minato-ku, Tokyo.

  • 5-minute walk from Shirokane Takanawa Station on the Namboku and Toei Mita lines.
  • 7-minute walk from Azabu Juban Station on the Namboku and Oedo lines.
  • 15-minute walk from Tamachi station on the Yamanote Line or from Mita Station on the Toei Mita Line.

Maps are available at http://www.tuj.ac.jp/maps/index.html.

Inquiries on this lecture: 03-5441-9842 (TESOL Dept.)