Course Descriptions for Summer 2017

Last update: April 28, 2017

Summer 2017 courses run from May 15 to August 5.

Conflict of Laws

Professor:
Macus Kosins, Managing Partner, Kosins International Law Office
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Thursdays 18:30 - 21:30
Room:
Mita 403

This course covers problems of jurisdiction, enforcement of foreign judgments, and choice of law arising within the context of the U.S. and its federal and state courts. This course emphasizes conflicts among state laws governing daily transactions as well as principles governing enforcement. It will also pay some attention to how other countries, including Japan, resolve these conflicts.

Note: This subject is tested on many U.S. Bar Examinations.

International Commercial Arbitration

Professor:
Michael Mroczek, Foreign Law Partner, Okuno & Partners
Tony Andriotis, Counsel, Hughes Hubbard & Reed
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Mondays 18:30 - 21:30
Room:
Mita 403

As an alternative to court proceedings, international arbitration is increasingly becoming one of the most important dispute resolution methods in cross-border transactions. The first part of the course will provide a general overview of the subject. It will introduce the main legal doctrines applying in arbitration and the applicable legal framework. It will familiarize students with the importance of the arbitration agreement and include some practical advices how to draft a workable arbitration clause. Based on the first part, the second part of the course will introduce the arbitration procedure: starting with the notice of arbitration, appointment of arbitrators through the arbitral award, its enforcement abroad and other post award proceedings.

Legal Research and Writing

Professor:
Catherine L. Pugh, Civil Rights Attorney
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Tuesdays 18:30 - 21:30
Room:
Mita 403

This course explores legal research, writing, and advocacy. After being introduced to the U.S. legal system and basic research techniques (including on-line data bases such as LexisNexis), students work on assigned problems to develop their writing and analytical skills. The program aims to develop basic legal research and writing skills in an informal, hands-on seminar atmosphere.

Note: This course is required of all LL.M. in U.S. Law Candidates.

Property

Professor:
John Price, Director, Legal Counsel, LIXIL Corporation
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Wednesdays 18:30 - 21:30
Room:
Mita 502

This course explores the basic relationships in forms of real and personal property ownership and considers the devices for transferring ownership of property. The topics covered will include modes of acquisition (e.g., capture, find, creation), adverse possession, present possessory estates and future interests, co-ownership of property, and marital property.

Note: This subject is tested on many U.S. Bar Examinations.