Course Descriptions for Spring 2017

Last update: September 28, 2016

Comparative Corporate Governance

Professor:
Sharon Houle Randall, Principal Houle Randall LLC
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Mondays, 18:30 - 21:30
Room:
Mita 502

This course will examine issues relating to corporate governance and ownership, including the legal structure of business entities in the U.S. and other countries; the duties of directors; and the roles of shareholders and employees. The course may also cover issues relating to the role of investors in and regulators of publicly traded corporations.

Comparative Immigration Law

Professor:
Macus Kosins, Managing Partner, Kosins International Law Office
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Tuesdays, 18:30 - 21:30
Room:
Mita 503

This course surveys the key areas of U.S. and Japanese immigration law, and provides students with a sound understanding of not only the law, but its application in practice. Cases and articles are used to illustrate the topics and issues that are relevant to both practicing lawyers and students of immigration law. The course will cover traditional areas such as political asylum and refugees, nonimmigrant and immigrant visas, as well as other issues to provide an insight into the practice of immigration law.

Constitutional Law I

Professor:
Robert J. Reinstein, Clifford Scott Green Chair Professor of Law, Temple University Beasley School of Law
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Mondays, 18:30 - 21:30
Room:
Mita 402

Judicial review of legislative and executive actions in a constitutional setting, the relationship of the states to the federal government (Federalism), the relationship of the people to government (Bill of Rights) and the powers of the Congress are considered.

Note: This subject is tested on many U.S. Bar Examinations.

East-West Negotiations

Professor:
Douglas Hymas, Country Executive for Japan and general manager, BNY Mellon
Bryan Koslow, Managing Director, Professionals Japan, Ltd.
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Thursdays, 18:30 - 21:30
Room:
Mita 503

This pass/fail course introduces students to the practical, legal, and cultural issues encountered when drafting and negotiating international agreements in the Asian context. The course particularly emphasizes negotiations involving American and Japanese parties through the examination of actual international commercial transactions. Students have an opportunity to participate in the preparation of mock agreements and negotiations.

Note: This course has limited enrollment.

Evidence

Professor:
M. Taylor Aspinwall, U.S. Attorney’s office for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Mondays, 18:30 - 21:30
Room:
Mita 403

An examination of the rules governing the use of evidence, including problems of relevancy, hearsay, impeachment, burden of proof, presumptions and the function of judge and jury.

Note: This subject is tested on many U.S. Bar Examinations.

International Contract Drafting

Professor:
Stan Yukevich, Partner, Morrison & Forester
Julie Miller, Corporate Attorney
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Wednesdays, 18:45 - 21:45
Room:
Mita 403

This course bridges the gap between contract theory and contract practice and offers practical insights into international contracts such as licenses, distributorships and joint ventures. It will principally focus on developing skills in drafting these types of contracts, although students may also have to undertake ancillary preparation exercises.

Note: This course has limited enrollment.

International Development and Policy Law: Writing Seminar

Professor:
Vipasha Bansal, Solicitor (non-practicing)
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Wednesdays, 19:00 - 21:00
Room:
Mita 502

This course will examine how law and legal institutions shape economic, political and social development in both theory and practice. We will look at some key texts and debates to understand the theoretical foundations of the field. We will also look at development practice from a lawyer's perspective, drawing on examples from both developed and developing countries. These case studies will help us critically examine questions such as: Do urban slum residents have the same access to justice as their wealthier neighbors? Which corporate structures should a developing economy adopt? Do intellectual property rights form a barrier to improving public health? What is the rule of law and why are economists promoting it? The aim of the course is not to find definitive answers to development questions. Rather, students will be encouraged to think broadly and deeply about development and how law relates to it.

International Taxation

Professor:
Dean Page, Accounting Asia
Paul Previtera, Attorney admitted in State of Washington and in Australia
Credit Hours:
2 credits
Day & Time:
1/10-13 and 1/17-20, 9:00 - 12:00 (Tuesday - Friday)
Room:
Mita 504

This course covers fundamental concepts in U.S. taxation of international transactions, both inbound (U.S. taxation of income received by foreign individuals or entities) and outbound (U.S. taxation of the foreign operations of United States taxpayers). The course will address questions of residence, jurisdiction to tax, source of income, the foreign tax credit, tax treaties, transfer pricing, and the operations of the controlled subsidiaries of United States corporations.

Introduction to the American Legal System

Professor:
Mason Hester, Attorney
Credit Hours:
2 credits
Day & Time:
Saturdays 10:00 - 12:00
Room:
Mita 502

This Course is intended to provide the student from a non-common law background with an introduction to the basic concepts, structures and institutions of the American Legal System. Topics to be covered include: historical origins of the common law system; common law method; the structure of the United States government, Federal and State; the Constitution; judicial review, structure, organization and operations of courts in the United States, civil litigation, case analysis and precedent: the legislative branch: statutes and legislative history; and the executive branch: administrative law.

Introduction to Japanese Law

Professor:
Nathan Frost, US Secretary, US-Japan Joint Committee, US Forces, Japan Government; Major, USAF
Katsuya Natori, Natori Law Office
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Tuesdays, 18:30 - 21:30
Room:
Mita 403

This course introduces students to Japanese law and the major principles of civil law systems. Students will examine the history, structure, and content of the Japanese legal system, the role of domestic and international law in Japan, the Japanese Constitution, and the major areas of Japanese law. To better equip students for transnational work involving Japanese entities, the course will focus on how Japanese laws, regulations, and culture affect corporations, business transactions, and individual rights in Japan. It will also consider the role of Japanese law in promoting transnational investment, current issues in the practice of law in Japan, and several current social issues on which law has an impact.

Notes:

  • J.D. study-abroad students are strongly encouraged to enroll in this course.
  • Students with a law degree from a Japanese university cannot enroll in this class.

National Security Law: Writing Option

Professor:
Robert J. Reinstein, Clifford Scott Green Chair Professor of Law, Temple University Beasley School of Law
Credit Hours:
2 credits
Day & Time:
Wednesdays, 15:30 - 17:30
Room:
Mita 405

This course will study national security threats – those posed to the United States by state and non-state actors who target US civilians, personnel and interests with the aim of achieving political change – and examine the legal controversies raised in responding to these threats domestically and abroad. The course will be divided into two parts. Part One will examine legal controversies in constitutional law. This includes the scope of presidential powers in times of heightened national security threats and the separation of powers more broadly. We will also explore the tension between national security and individual liberties during times of crisis. Part Two will examine the legal controversies raised by irregular combat between the US and non-state actors internationally. We will study some of the most important and controversial legal issues triggered by the so-called 'war on terror.'

Professional Responsibility

Professor:
F. Frederic (Ric) Fouad, Attorney
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Thursdays, 18:30 - 21:30
Room:
Mita 403

This core course addresses the practical and ethical questions that attorneys face every day, from evaluating complex conflicts of interest problems and handling inadvertent disclosures of confidential information to dealing with unrepresented parties and attorney advertising. Utilizing the Model Code of Professional Responsibility, American Bar Association Committee on Ethics opinions, the California Rules of Professional Conduct, relevant sections of the California Business and Professions Code, select state and local bar opinions, and topical news articles touching on attorney ethics, the class take a "real world" approach to Professional Responsibility. The societal role of attorneys in shaping the judicial system is also a focus. The course will also help with preparation for the M.P.R.E. as Professional Responsibility is tested on Bar Exams throughout the U.S.

Guided Research

Professor:
Tina Saunders, Director and Associate Professor of Instruction in Law, Temple University Beasley School of Law
Credit Hours:
2 or 3 credits
Day & Time:
 
Room:
 

This independent research offers students an opportunity to (1) satisfy the mandated writing requirement, (2) develop research, writing and analytical abilities through producing a single substantive research paper and (3) work with a faculty member in an area of the teacher's interest or expertise. Students have a Faculty member agree to supervise them and must submit a signed Approval form to the Registrar to request participation.

Survival Japanese

Professor:
Akiko Yoshida, Japanese teacher
Credit Hours:
non-credit
Day & Time:
Monday - Friday, 13:15 - 14:45 (1/10-30)
(Mon. - Fri.) (22.5 hours)
Room:
Mita 405

This course is intended to give students with little to no Japanese language ability, basic speaking and listening proficiency to be able to live comfortably in Tokyo for the semester.

Beginner Japanese

Professor:
Nozomi Takano, Japanese teacher
Credit Hours:
non-credit
Day & Time:
Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 12:15 - 15:15 (2/1-24)
(36 + 4 hours [cultural activities])
Room:
Mita 405

This course is intended for students with little to no Japanese language experience and will focus on Japanese speaking, reading, and writing.

U.S. Bar Exam Study Course

Professor:
TBA
Credit Hours:
non-credit
Day & Time:
TBA
Room:
TBA

This course is a comprehensive lecture series on techniques and strategies to take a U.S. state bar exam. This class will help prepare you for the bar exam, the multistate/multiple-choice section (“the MBE”), state essays, and the multistate performance test (“MPT”) questions. The course will use many different resources, including doctrinal lectures, classroom discussions, substantive outlines, many practice questions, and individual coaching. In this class, as with the bar exam, what matters most is results, and our goal is to make sure that each of you can use these various inputs to produce successful outcomes.