Course Descriptions for Spring 2016

Last update: September 17, 2015

Business Planning for International Transactions

Professor:
Sharon Houle Randall, Principal Houle Randall LLC
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Tuesdays, 6:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.
Room:
Mita

This course covers issues that arise when business organizations conduct international transactions. It will address topics such as the international legal and economic environments, international sale of goods, agency and distributorship agreements, licensing agreements, establishment of operations abroad, mergers and acquisitions, development agreements and financing.

Comparative Criminal Law Writing Seminar

Professor:
Marina Angel, Temple University Beasley School of Law
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Tuesdays, 7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.
Room:
Mita

This writing seminar will be comparative in method and perspective. Students will write approximately one 1-page paper a week and a final 10-page paper. The course will compare American criminal law and procedure, with Japanese criminal law. Japan is primarily a civil law system. Some topics which will be covered are definitions of crimes, arrests, searches, right to counsel, jury trials, confessions, and guilty pleas.

Note: This course has limited enrollment.

Comparative Employment and Labor Law Writing Seminar

Professor:
Marina Angel, Temple University Beasley School of Law
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Mondays, 7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.
Room:
Mita

This writing seminar will be comparative in method and perspective. Students will write approximately one 1-page paper a week and a final 10-page paper. The course will focus on the employment and labor laws of the United States and make some comparisons with those of Japan. Topics that will be covered will include unionization and collective bargaining, employment at will, and employment discrimination.

Note: This course has limited enrollment.

Criminal Procedure I

Professor:
Randall Spencer, Managing Partner Fillmore Spencer LLC, Provo,Utah
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Mondays, 6:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.
Room:
Mita

This basic criminal procedure course deals mainly with the constitutional rules governing police conduct prior to the institution of formal court proceedings. It will focus primarily on the federal constitutional rights and restrictions imposed by the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth and Fourteenth Amendments. Searches and seizures, police interrogation, identification procedures, and the exclusion of evidence obtained in violation of these provisions account for a substantial portion of the course. It will also cover some additional matters, including some aspects of the formal court-connected proceedings and the basic principles of habeas corpus.

Current Issues in Japanese Law

Professor:
Katsuya Natori, Natori Law Office
Credit Hours:
2 credits
Day & Time:
10 Sessions (Jan. 12 - Mar. 22), Tuesdays, 6:30 p.m. - 8:50 p.m.
Room:
Mita

This seminar is available only to students whose Japanese language ability will enable them to participate in classes conducted in Japanese and to read primary source material in Japanese. Students are not required to write kanji, but will have to read complex Japanese texts. Students who can read Japanese newspaper articles, with or without using a dictionary, are sufficiently proficient. The course covers a variety of subjects including recent legal reforms in Japan.

Note: This course is taught in Japanese. Students with a law degree from a Japanese university cannot enroll in this class.

East-West Negotiation

Professor:
Douglas Hymas, President/CEO, ING Mutual Funds Management Company (Japan), Ltd.
Bryan Koslow, Managing Director, Professionals Japan, Ltd.
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Thursdays, 6:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.
Room:
Mita

This pass/fail course introduces students to the practical, legal, and cultural issues encountered when drafting and negotiating international agreements in the Asian context. The course particularly emphasizes negotiations involving American and Japanese parties through the examination of actual international commercial transactions. Students have an opportunity to participate in the preparation of mock agreements and negotiations.

Note: This course has limited enrollment.

International Contract Drafting

Professor:
Stan Yukevich, Partner, Morrison & Forester
Daniel Joseph Jones, Associate, Squire Patton Boggs
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Wednesdays, 6:45 p.m. - 9:45 p.m.
Room:
Mita

This course bridges the gap between contract theory and contract practice and offers practical insights into international contracts such as licenses, distributorships and joint ventures. It will principally focus on developing skills in drafting these types of contracts, although students may also have to undertake ancillary preparation exercises.

Note: This course has limited enrollment.

International Law

Professor:
Grant Stillman, Legal Advisor, Asian Development Bank Institute
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Wednesdays, 6:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.
Room:
Mita

This course surveys the fundamental concepts of public international law and practice. Areas of principal focus include the nature and sources of international law; international personality and recognition; treaties and customary international law; international dispute resolution; international organizations, NGOs and regimes, such as the Law of the Sea; state responsibility for injuries and remedies; the use of force; and transnational reach of domestic law and conflict of law.

Note: TLLM candidates who have not taken International Law during their prior studies must take this course in addition to the 24 credits required to earn the degree.

International Taxation

Professor:
Dean Page, Accounting Asia
Paul Previtera, Attorney admitted in State of Washington and in Australia
Credit Hours:
2 credits
Day & Time:
9:00-12:00 on Jan. 12-15 (Tue.-Fri.) and Jan. 19-22 (Tue.-Fri.)
Room:
Mita

This course covers fundamental concepts in U.S. taxation of international transactions, both inbound (U.S. taxation of income received by foreign individuals or entities) and outbound (U.S. taxation of the foreign operations of United States taxpayers). The course will address questions of residence, jurisdiction to tax, source of income, the foreign tax credit, tax treaties, transfer pricing, and the operations of the controlled subsidiaries of United States corporations.

Introduction to Japanese Law

Professor:
Nathan Frost, US Secretary, US-Japan Joint Committee, US Forces, Japan Government; Major, USAF
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Thursdays, 3:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Room:
Mita

This comparative law course introduces students to Japanese law and the major principles of civil law systems. Students will examine the history, structure, and content of the Japanese legal system, the role of domestic and international law in Japan, the Japanese Constitution, and the major areas of Japanese law. To better equip students for transnational work involving Japanese entities, the course will focus on how Japanese laws, regulations, and culture affect corporations, business transactions, and individual rights in Japan. It will also consider the role of Japanese law in promoting transnational investment, current issues in the practice of law in Japan, and several current social issues on which law has an impact.

Notes:

  • J.D. study-abroad students are strongly encouraged to enroll in this course.
  • Students with a law degree from a Japanese university cannot enroll in this class.

Professional Respoinsibility

Professor:
Ric Fouad, Attorney & Child Welfare Advocate.
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Thursdays, 6:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.
Room:
Mita

If legal institutions provide the framework of a just society, attorneys are the architects and engineers who construct and maintain it. This core course addresses the complex ethical issues that arise as counsel play their parts within this larger legal framework, whether evaluating conflicts of interest or handling inadvertent disclosures of confidential information. The societal role of attorneys as agents of change will also be addressed including pro bono efforts. The course will also help with preparation for the M.P.R.E. as Professional Responsibility is tested on Bar Exams throughout the U.S. Material covered will include Model Code of Professional Responsibility, American Bar Association Committee on Ethics opinions, California Rules of Professional Conduct, relevant sections of the California Business and Professions Code, select state and local bar opinions, and topical news articles touching on attorney ethics.

Note: This subject is commonly tested on Bar Exams across the United States.