Course Descriptions for Summer 2015

Last update: February 27, 2015

Civil Procedure

Professor:
Tina Saunders, Professor
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Mondays, May 11 to July 27
12 sessions on Mondays 6:30 p.m. – 9:30 p.m.,
and 1 session TBD
Room:
Mita 403

Civil Procedure concerns the rules and principles governing civil actions in state and federal court. This course will address the fundamental issues of court jurisdiction over the parties and the subject matter of a dispute; and the related issues of venue, conflict of laws, and the applicable body of law applied to disputes. Additional issues which will be covered include: notice and pleading requirements, joinder of additional parties/claims, obtaining evidence by discovery, and the preclusive effect of decisions. The course will focus primarily on the federal courts and the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure.

This subject is tested on many U.S. Bar Examinations.

Constitutional Law

Professor:
Simona Grossi, Professor
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Wednesdays, May 27 to July 29
10 sessions on Wednesdays 6:30 p.m. – 9:30 p.m.,
and 3 sessions TBD
Room:
Mita 403

This 3-unit course surveys U.S. Constitutional law. It will focus on Supreme Court decisions interpreting the United States Constitution, for in those decisions we discover the enforceable principles of Constitutional Law. The range of topics covered includes those relating to the structure and powers of the federal government, the relationship between the federal government and state governments, and the protection of individual liberties against both the federal and state governments. More specifically, we will cover judicial review (the power of the judiciary to declare a federal or state law unconstitutional); the enumerated powers of the federal government (e.g., the power over interstate and foreign commerce, the power to declare war); the separation of powers among the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of the federal government; federal supremacy over state laws; federalism (states' rights against federal interference); special constitutional limits on state power; and a variety of individual rights (freedom of speech, freedom of religion, privacy, right to marry, and equal protection).

This subject is tested on many U.S. Bar Examinations.

International Civil Litigation

Professor:
Aaron Ghirardelli, Professor
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Tuesdays, May 26 to July 28
10 sessions on Tuesdays 6:30 p.m. – 9:30 p.m.,
and 3 sessions on TBD
Room:
Mita 403

With the globalization of business transactions, cross-border civil litigation has become common. Given that legal systems, laws, social values and culture differ from country to country, international civil litigation poses a much more complicated reality that requires both knowledge and expertise beyond the traditional domain of domestic litigation. The course will examine the international law that governs “foreign” relations between individuals or business entities, and will discuss the theory and practice of international civil dispute settlement. The issues it will cover include determining the proper forum, finding the applicable law, judicial assistance (e.g. service of process, discovery and foreign judgment enforcement), and litigation involving a foreign state. It will also discuss such important practical matters as how to draft a dispute settlement clause, how to meaningfully choose a forum and the applicable law to more effectively protect the client’s interest, and how to address potential obstacles facing lawyers engaging in international practice.

Legal Research and Writing

Professor:
Christopher Rathbone, Professor
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Thursdays, May 14 to August 6
6:30 p.m. – 9:30 p.m.
Room:
Mita 403

This course explores legal research, writing, and advocacy. After being introduced to the U.S. legal system and basic research techniques (including on-line data bases such as LexisNexis), students work on assigned problems using various methods to help them develop their writing and analytical skills. The program aims to develop basic legal research and writing skills in an informal, hands-on seminar atmosphere.

Note: This course is required of all LL.M. candidates who were not trained in the U.S.