Course Descriptions for Spring 2014

Last update: December 6, 2013

Current Issues in Japanese Law

Professor:
Katsuya Natori, Natori Law Office
Credit Hours:
2 credits
Day & Time:
Tuesday 18:45 - 21:0
Room:
Mita 401

This seminar is available only to students with a sufficient level of Japanese language ability to enable them to participate in classes conducted in Japanese and to read primary source material in Japanese. Students are not required to write Kanji, but will have to read complex Japanese texts. A sufficient measure of language proficiency required is the ability to read Japanese newspaper articles, with or without using a dictionary. The course covers a variety of subjects including recent legal reforms in Japan.

This course is taught in Japanese. Students with a law degree from a Japanese university cannot enroll in this class.

East-West Negotiation

Professor:
Douglas Hymas, President/CEO, ING Mutual Funds Management Company (Japan), Ltd.
Bryan Koslow, Managing Director, Professionals Japan, Ltd.
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Thursday 18:30 - 21:30
Room:
MIta 504 (402 on Feb. 6)

This pass/fail course introduces students to the practical, legal, and cultural issues encountered when drafting and negotiating international agreements in the Asian context. A particular emphasis will be placed on negotiations involving American and Japanese parties through the examination of actual international commercial transactions. Students have an opportunity to participate in the preparation of mock agreements and negotiations.

Evidence

Professor:
Jaya Ramji-Nogales, Temple University Beasley School of Law, Philadelphia
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Monday 18:30 - 21:30
Room:
Mita 402

This survey course provides an overview of the regime created by the U.S. Constitution and Federal Rules of Evidence to govern the introduction of testimonial and real evidence in federal court, covering relevance, character evidence, impeachment, the Rape Shield law, hearsay, the Confrontation Clause, opinion testimony, authentication, the best evidence rule, and privileges.

This subject is tested on many U.S. Bar Examinations.

International Contract Drafting

Professor:
Stan Yukevich, Partner, Morrison & Foerster
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Wednesday 18:30 - 21:30
Room:
Mita 504

This course bridges the gap between contract theory and contract practice and offers practical insights into international contracts such as licenses, distributorships and joint ventures. The principal focus will be on the development of skills in drafting these types of contracts, although ancillary preparation exercises may also be undertaken.

This course has limited enrollment.

International Law

Professor:
Kara Abramson, Visiting Fellow, Tokyo University Institute for Advanced Studies on Asia
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Monday & Wednesday 16:00 - 17:24
First class on January 15.
Room:
Mita 401 (403 for 2/17, 19, 3/10, 12)

International Law is designed to introduce students to the basic tenets of public international law, the current state of the international legal order, and the ever-present tension between theory and practice that arises in applying international law to real-world situations. Students should emerge from the course with a firm understanding of (a) the sources of international law (e.g., treaties, customary international law, and general principles of law); (b) the ways in which international law relates to domestic legal orders, especially the U.S. legal system; (c) the subjects of international law (e.g., states, international organizations, and, to a more limited extent, individuals), including their respective roles in creating law and resolving disputes as to its content or application; (d) the manner in which the international legal order creates specialized normative regimes in areas such as human rights, trade, and the use of force; and, finally, (e) the efficacy of the current system and its capacity for change. This course has no prerequisites. It is designed for both the student seeking to acquire the basic building blocks necessary to pursue a career in international law as well as for the student planning to practice within the U.S. or Japanese legal system who needs to understand how international law can (and will) relate to that practice.

Introduction to Japanese Law

Professor:
Nathan Frost, US Secretary, US-Japan Joint Committee, US Forces, Japan Government; Major, USAF
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Thursday 16:00 - 18:00 (1/9, 16 & 23), 15:00 - 18:00 (1/30 - 4/17)
Room:
Mita 403

This comparative law course introduces students to Japanese law and the major principles of civil law systems. Students will examine the history, structure, and content of the Japanese legal system, the role of domestic and international law in Japan, the Japanese Constitution, and the major areas of Japanese law. To better equip students for transnational work involving Japanese entities, the course will focus on how Japanese laws, regulations, and culture affect corporations, business transactions, and individual rights in Japan. It will also consider the role of Japanese law in promoting transnational investment, current issues in the practice of law in Japan, and several current social issues on which law has an impact.

J.D. study-abroad students are strongly encouraged to enroll in this course.
Students with a law degree from a Japanese university cannot enroll in this class.

Professional Responsibility

Professor:
Kelly Knepper-Stephens, General Counsel, Stoneleigh Recovery Services
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Monday 18:30 - 21:30
Room:
Mita 403

If legal institutions provide the framework of a just society, attorneys are the architects and engineers who construct and maintain it. This core course addresses the complex ethical issues that arise as counsel play their parts within this larger legal framework, whether evaluating conflicts of interest or handling inadvertent disclosures of confidential information. The societal role of attorneys as agents of change will also be addressed including pro bono efforts. The course will also help with preparation for the M.P.R.E. as Professional Responsibility is tested on Bar Exams throughout the U.S. Material covered will include Model Code of Professional Responsibility, American Bar Association Committee on Ethics opinions, California Rules of Professional Conduct, relevant sections of the California Business and Professions Code, select state and local bar opinions, and topical news articles touching on attorney ethics.

This subject is commonly tested on Bar Exams across the United States.

Refugee Law: Writing Seminar

Professor:
Jaya Ramji-Nogales, Temple University Beasley School of Law
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Wednesday 19:00 - 21:00
Room:
Mita 402

This serial writing seminar will provide an introduction to international and domestic refugee law and policy. Beginning with an overview of the origins of modern international refugee law and policy, the course will then move into a basic background of the asylum process in the United States. We will next engage in an in-depth discussion of the doctrine of American asylum law, walking through the relevant elements laid out in asylum law and focusing particularly on areas of doctrinal growth. The course will also introduce students to the standard for claims to protection under the Convention Against Torture. We will then focus on detention of asylum seekers, reading both case law and policy papers. After this grounding in the American asylum system, the course will step back to examine international issues in refugee protection, including temporary and subsidiary protection, internally displaced persons, and durable solutions. We will wrap up with a discussion of challenges facing the American and international refugee law regimes in the future.

Trusts & Estates

Professor:
Finbarr McCarthy, Temple University Beasley School of Law
Credit Hours:
3 credits
Day & Time:
Tuesday 18:30 - 21:30
Room:
Mita 403

This course surveys the principal devices used in the transmission of accumulated family wealth, concentrating primarily on the requirements for creating, modifying and terminating wills and trusts. It also considers intestate succession, will substitutes and selected issues concerning future interests, powers of appointment and fiduciary administration. The course explores the often clashing policies of effectuating donative intent and restraining dead-hand control.

This subject is tested on many U.S. Bar Examinations.

Beginning Japanese

Professor:
Takano Nozomi
Credit Hours:
No credits
Day & Time:
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 12:15 - 15:1
Class Period:
January 31 - February 28
Room:
Mita 504

Intended for students with little or no Japanese language experience, this course focuses on Japanese speaking, reading, and writing.

Survival Japanese

Professor:
Yoshida Akiko
Credit Hours:
No credits
Day & Time:
Monday - Friday 13:45 - 15:15
Class Period:
January 9 - 29
Room:
Mita 504

Intended for students with little or no Japanese language ability, Survival Japanese aims, through daily, weekday classes during January, to have students achieve basic proficiency in speaking and listening.