Ron Martin

Ph.D.

日本語版はこちら

Today, I will take you on a short retrospective trip. I encourage you to follow along and think about your own experiences and the people associated with them. I will begin in 1999. I realize that for some of the 2013 class this means that you were in elementary school, which is just as good a place as any to start.

In March of 1999 I got married, and that is really where my story here in Japan begins. It was then that I made a commitment to my wife, Japan, and to establishing my career in language education. At the time, I was teaching at a public junior high school as an assistant language teacher.

In January of 2000 I entered the Masters program here at Temple.

During the fall of 2000 I met two teachers from a private school at a weekend seminar. They told me that they had been looking for someone to join their new junior high school. They were about to open a new building and accept new students, and so in April of 2001 I started teaching at the junior high eager to put my Temple education to work to help build a new curriculum.

In the fall of 2001 I finished my Masters coursework.

A few months later in the summer of 2002 I was misdiagnosed with pancreatic cancer and lived about 10 weeks believing that my life was going to change forever.

That fall I realized that my junior high position would not become tenured.

So, in January of 2003 I entered the doctorate program at Temple… Yes, 10 years ago.

In November of 2004 toward the end of my core doctoral coursework, my mother died and one month later my wife and I welcomed home our adopted son.

In 2005 I finished the core courses of the doctoral program, and my dissertation began patiently waiting for me.

In February of 2006 my dad passed away.

In March of 2007 my wife and I welcomed home our adopted daughter.

My dissertation was still waiting.

At the turn between the 2008 and 2009 Japanese academic years I left the work world of language education for young learners for a full time contract position in the College of Intercultural Communication at Rikkyo University.

For the decade between 1999 and 2008 I gave around 50 workshops for public elementary and junior high school Japanese teachers and though I have never counted, well over double that number to native English speaking teachers. During that time I often worked over 60 hours a week and for one year in particular nearly 80. I was also told that more than likely I was the first native English speaker to have been invited by a board of education to an open lesson as a guest lecturer…that happened twice.

In 2012 I joined the College of Intercultural Communication at Rikkyo as a tenured faculty member…with the clear expectation that my dissertation would get done in short order. Well, it has or I would not be standing here today.

This retrospective trip is not about loss of loved ones or the welcoming of children, success or even hardship or challenges. It is simply about life events. I asked you to think about your own experiences and the people associated with them. I am sure that your experiences are similar to mine on number and influence and there is a great chance that some among you have withstood greater adversity than I could ever imagine.

I will close with something my mother told me once…just a few years out of college. She said, "You know what you can and can't do." I think deep down we all know this. In the early 2000s I told my colleagues and my wife that it was my goal — not dream — but goal to one day be a tenured professor at a Japanese university teaching future teachers and if I had the chance to, to one day also teach in the Graduate College of Education here at TUJ. There wasn't a chorus telling me that it was possible and my wife also wondered why I thought I could…worried that perhaps I had some kind of false hope. Well, I knew I could…that I would work toward that goal until I achieved it or realized that I had to change direction.

Just like you. You knew you could finish your degree here at Temple. You knew you could do it. You did it. We did it. Congratulations and thank you.


ロン・マーティン

教育学応用言語学博士(Ph.D.)

本日は、みなさんをつかの間の回想の旅へお連れしたいと思います。みなさんも是非一緒にご自身のこれまでの経験を思いうかべてください。では、1999年から始めましょう。みなさんの中には、当時小学生だったという人もいるでしょうね。申し分のないスタート地点です。

私は1999年3月に結婚し、妻、日本、そして語学教育のキャリアを確立するという物語はここから始まりました。当時、私は公立中学校のALT(外国語指導助手)として英語を教えていました。

2000年1月、テンプル大学の修士課程に入学しました。

2000年の秋、テンプル大学で行われた週末セミナーで、私は私立学校に勤める二人の教師と出会いました。彼らは、これから開校する中学校の教師を探しているんだと言いました。新しい校舎が完成し、まさに新入生を迎えようとしていたところだったのです。2001年4月、私はテンプルで培った知識や技能を、新たなカリキュラムづくりに活かそうと、その中学校で教え始めました。

2001年秋、修士課程を修了しました。

数ヵ月後の2002年夏、私は膵臓がんと誤って診断され、これで人生はすっかり変わってしまうと信じ込んで、およそ10週間を過ごしました。

その秋、いまの中学校の職では、テニュア(終身在職権)を取得できないことがわかりました。

そこで2003年の1月、テンプル大学の博士課程に入学しました。そうです、10年前のことです。

博士課程のコースワークが終わりに近づいた2004年11月、母が亡くなりました。そして1ヵ月後に妻と私は養子を迎えました。

2005年、博士課程のコースワークを終え、ようやく博士論文の執筆が始まりました。

2006年2月、父がこの世を去りました。

2007年3月、妻と私は養女を迎えました。

まだ論文は完成していません。

2008年から2009年へと年度がうつる時、立教大学の異文化コミュニケーション学部でフルタイムの仕事を得て、私は前職を去りました。

1999年から2008年の10年間、私は公立の小中学校の日本人教師向けのワークショップを50回ほど行いました。数えたことはありませんが、ネイティブ教師向けのものはその倍以上は行ったはずです。その間、私はたびたび週60時間以上、ある年には80時間近く働きました。どうやら私は、教育委員会から客員講師として公開授業に招聘された最初のネイティブスピーカーだったようです。招聘は2回でした。

2012年、じきに論文が完成するという見込みで、立教大学・異文化コミュニケーション学部の専任教授となりました。そしてめでたく見込みを達成したわけです。そうでなければ、私は今ここに立っていないでしょう。

この回想の旅は、愛する人を失ったり子供を迎え入れたりすること、あるいは成功や困難、挑戦についての物語ではありません。ただ単に人生の出来事を並べただけです。私は、みなさん自身の経験とそれに関わった人々について考えてほしいとお願いしました。きっと、みなさんの経験も私のそれと近いものでしょう。なかには、私には想像もつかないような逆境に耐えた方もいるはずです。

最後は、かつて母が私に残してくれた言葉で締めくくりたいと思います。大学を出て数年経った頃でした。「あなたは、何ができて、何ができないかわかっている」。私たちは心の奥底でこれを知っていると思います。2000年代の初め、いつの日か日本の大学で未来の教師を指導する、専任教授になることが私のゴールだ(決して夢ではなく)と、私は同僚と妻に話しました。そしてチャンスがあるならば、いつかTUJの大学院教育学研究科でも教えたいと。いけいけ!という応援の声が多かったわけではありません。妻も、ありもしない望みをかけているのではと心配しながら、なぜ私がそれをできると思えたのか不思議がっていました。そう、私はできると知っていたのです。達成するまで、もしくは方向転換する必要があるとわかるまで、私はその目標に向かって励むことを。

私もみなさんと同じです。みなさんは、テンプル大学で学位を修めることができるとわかっていた。やれるとわかっていた。そして成し遂げた。我々は、成し遂げたのです。おめでとうございます。そしてありがとうございました。