Tsuyuki Miura

Doctor of Education

Ms. Miura currently teaches English in the Japanese university system and recently received a Doctor in Education degree. We talked with her about her decision to pursue advanced degrees in TESOL and the difficulties involved in writing a dissertation.

How did your early education and work history lead you to studying English education?

My undergraduate studies were in Japanese literature at a Japanese university. After finishing my undergraduate studies, I worked as an office worker for about ten years. I wanted a more specialized job, so for career development I attended some intensive English programs in the United States and Japan. After working as a secretary and interpreter for a short while, about thirteen years ago I started to teach English at a language school, which was when I first became involved in English education.

You earned both a Masters and a Doctorate in Education at Temple, what motivated you to join the doctoral cohort?

Studying in the M.S.Ed. program had an impact on me: The program was practical and intellectual, and the teachers were enthusiastic and friendly. I thought that studying was interesting for the first time in my life. The M.S.Ed. degree was sufficient for me to obtain teaching positions in Japanese universities, but I felt that my knowledge of the field was relatively shallow. I wanted to study second language acquisition more deeply, and joining the Ed.D. cohort seemed like a good opportunity to do so.

What was the focus of your research?

I was interested in the motivational changes that had occurred in my English learning. I was not motivated to study English in my teenage years, but was strongly motivated when I became an adult. Because few studies of long term motivational change had been conducted in the field, I decided to focus my research in that area.

What challenges did you face earning your doctorate?

I faced miscellaneous challenges while completing the process. It took me five and a half years; two and a half years to complete the course work and three years of dissertation writing. As is the case with most EdD students, I had never written a dissertation. Most of the process was a new experience and I encountered blocks a number of times. In addition, I had other parts of my life to attend to—primarily my work and my family. I always had good excuses not to study. Ultimately, therefore, how I perceived and dealt with the difficulties I faced was the biggest challenge.

How did you overcome that challenge?

Because my dissertation topic concerned long-term motivation in foreign language learning, I kept thinking about the reasons why people endure and overcome difficulties when facing challenging tasks. This actually helped me overcome the many challenges I was facing in my dissertation writing. I tried to perceive all the challenges as an important part of my learning process. I also kept faith in myself: I believed that I would complete the task someday. Even if unexpected problems came up and took longer to solve than anticipated, I accepted them and moved forward little by little. Of course, I was supported by people around me a great deal. My chief advisor consistently wrote me, "Send me a new draft when it's ready." Because of his unyielding support and encouragement, I could keep writing a draft after draft for the three years. Also, my family kept saying, "You'll be alright." They probably knew that they could not help me academically, but I think they understood I was doing something challenging that was important to me.

How do you envision your Ed.D. and your experience at TUJ will help your future career?

Completing my doctorate will give me better choices for my future career, and I can be slightly more confident now that I have achieved something challenging. This semester I started teaching in the M.S.Ed. program, which could never have happened without completing the Ed.D. Helping new students in the program is really rewarding to me.

Tell us about your dreams and aspirations.

The more I have learned, the more I have understood how little I know. So, I hope to keep learning and help people by using my own experience, for example writing informative books for learners.

三浦つゆき

教育学博士(Ed.D.)

このたび教育学英語教授法(TESOL)で博士課程を修められた三浦さんは、現在日本の大学で英語を教えていらっしゃいます。大学院に進んだ動機や博士論文執筆におけるご苦労などを伺いました。

—英語教育に携わるようになるまでのご経歴を、簡単に教えてください。

日本の大学の国文科を卒業後、会社員として10年間勤めましたが、もっと専門的な仕事がしたくて、キャリアアップのため日本とアメリカでいくつかの英語研修プログラムに参加しました。秘書や通訳としてしばらく活動した後、13年ほど前になりますが、語学学校で教職を得ました。それが初めての英語教育の仕事です。

—テンプルで教育学の修士と博士、両方を修められましたね。博士号を目指された動機は何だったのでしょう?

大きな刺激を与えてくれたのが、修士課程での勉強でした。プログラムは実用的かつ知的、また先生方も熱心で明るい雰囲気でした。学ぶ楽しさに目覚めたのだと思います。日本の大学で教職を得るには修士号でも十分ではあったのですが、この分野における自分の専門知識はまだ比較的浅いと感じていました。第二言語の習得についてもっと深く勉強したかったので、博士課程に進もうと考えました。

—研究テーマを教えてください。

私自身が英語を習得する過程で経験したモチベーションの変化に、とても興味がありました。10代の頃はまったく英語を勉強する意欲がなかったのに、大人になってからは180度変わった。このように長期にわたる動機付けの変化について実地に行われた研究はほとんどなかったので、これをテーマにしようと決めました。

—勉強中なにが一番大きなチャレンジでしたか?

コース修了までに2年半、博士論文の完成に3年、あわせて5年半の年月の間には、それはたくさんの困難に出会いましたよ。博士課程の学生はみな同じだと思いますが、私は博士論文というものを書くのは初めてでした。そのプロセスのほとんどが新しい経験で、何度も何度も壁に突き当たりました。もちろん、仕事も家庭生活もおろそかにできませんから、勉強しないための口実はいつでも見つかりました。つまるところ、直面した困難を私自身がどう認識し、どう乗り越えるか、それが最大のチャレンジだったと言えます。

—実際どのように乗り越えられたのでしょうか?

外国語の習得における長期間のモチベーション変化が研究テーマですから、難しいことに直面したとき、人はどうやってそれに耐え克服していくのか、ということを常に考えていました。これが、実際自分が論文を書くにあたってぶつかった壁を乗り越えるのに役立ったと言えます。すべての「壁」は、自分の学びのプロセスの一部として重要なのだと考えるようにしました。それから、自分自身を信じること、ですね。いつかはやり遂げられる、といつも自分に言い聞かせていました。予期しない事態が発生しても、思ったより解決に時間がかかっても、そんな状況を受け入れて少しずつ前進したのです。もちろん、周囲の人たちの支援もありました。アドバイザーの先生は「新しい原稿ができたらいつでも送ってきなさい。」と言葉をかけ続けてくれました。先生の大いなる支援のおかげで、三年に渡り原稿を書き続けることができました。また家族はいつも「大丈夫、大丈夫。」と励ましてくれました。勉強の面では手助けできなくても、私が難しいけれど何かとても大切なことに取り組んでいるということを、よく理解してくれていました。

—博士号の取得やテンプルでの経験が、今後のキャリアにどのように生かせると思われますか?

キャリアの幅が広がったことは確かですね。また、大きなことを達成してこれまでより少し自信もつきました。今学期から修士課程でコースを教え始めましたが、これも博士号がなければできなかったことです。新しい学生の勉強を支援するのは、とてもやりがいがあります。

—三浦さんの人生の夢をお聞かせください。

学べば学ぶほど、知らないことの多さに気づかされます。だから、私は学び続けたいし、私の経験をもって他の人を支援したいと願っています。学習者の役に立つ本を執筆することも、ひとつの夢ですね。

ページのトップへ移動